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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Santa Fe school district is backing away from a plan to place police officers on campuses among its efforts to improve school safety. The Albuquerque Journal reports the city told Santa Fe Public Schools that its police department does not have enough officers to assign three to school campuses. The city and district were talks about splitting the estimated $200,000 cost of the action. School board members at a budget session Tuesday supported adding $500,000 next year to fund school safety and prevention.

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico state lawmakers are getting a preview of a business plan for expanding early childhood education across the state that was developed by a group of major charitable foundations. The plan seeks to expand state spending by $16 million each year to gradually expand and improve the workforce for prekindergarten, childcare and home visits with families in infants. An outline was presented Wednesday to members of the Legislative Finance Committee who draft the state budget.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque Mayor Tim Keller says the city has partnered with a local organization to set up an information line that sexual assault victims can call to seek information about their cases. He says the information line is the result of an initiative that has prioritized eliminating the backlog of more than 4,000 untested rape kits in the city's crime lab.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A former New Mexico labor and film union leader is denying sexual misconduct allegations that cost him his job and forced a Democratic Party of New Mexico chair to resign. The Albuquerque Journal reports Jon Hendry in court documents denied all claims made against him by two women in a lawsuit. Two women said in a lawsuit filed in March that Hendry harassed and discriminated against them when they were union employees. Hendry served as a business agent for the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 480 and resigned after the lawsuit.

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico Supreme Court has ordered that 10 bills vetoed by Gov. Susana Martinez in 2017 go into effect anyway because the governor failed to provide an immediate explanation or her reasoning to lawmakers as required by the state constitution. The court decision Wednesday resolves a year-long dispute over the extent of the governor's veto authority. In oral arguments, attorneys for the Democrat-led Legislatures said Martinez made it difficult or impossible to respond to her concerns about proposed legislation or to move forward with an override vote.

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Santa Fe school district is backing away from a plan to place police officers on campuses among its efforts to improve school safety. The Albuquerque Journal reports the city told Santa Fe Public Schools that its police department does not have enough officers to assign three to school campuses. The city and district were talks about splitting the estimated $200,000 cost of the action. School board members at a budget session Tuesday supported adding $500,000 next year to fund school safety and prevention.

University of Michigan students Griffin St. Onge and Lauren Schandevel have published an online guide that anybody can edit called "Being Not Rich at UM." It's a Google Doc about navigating the costs of college that has grown to more than 80 pages.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

John Brennan's tenure as CIA director ended the same day that President Trump entered office last year, and since then, the former spy chief has been a relentless critic of the president.

"I think he is dishonest, he lacks integrity, he has very questionable ethics and morality, and he views the world through a prism of 'how it's going to help Donald Trump?,' " Brennan said in a wide-ranging interview with All Things Considered.

"I just think that he has not fulfilled the responsibilities of the president of the United States," Brennan added.

Four mass graves that concealed thousands of victims of the Rwandan genocide for 24 years have been discovered.

The first bodies were found on Sunday at a depth of 80 feet and the excavation continues, according to The New Times in Rwanda.

New Jersey Democratic Sen. Robert Menendez escaped federal criminal prosecution. But he couldn't escape the judgment of his Senate colleagues.

The bipartisan Senate Ethics Committee unanimously issued a rare rebuke on Thursday, formally admonishing the senator for his conduct over a six-year period with his longtime friend and political ally Dr. Salomon Melgen.

As it reopened its doors for business Wednesday, four wooden crosses painted white and decorated with hearts and balloons stood in front of a Nashville-area Waffle House, a stark reminder that just three days earlier it was the scene of seemingly random and lethal bloodshed.

Each victim killed in Sunday's shooting rampage had their photographs and and names on one of the crosses: Taurean C. Sanderlin, 29; Joe R. Perez, 20; DeEbony Groves, 21; and Akilah DaSilva, 23.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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