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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Officials have banned the sale of aerial and ground fireworks in areas outside Albuquerque.Bernalillo County commissioners approved the fireworks restrictions Tuesday in unincorporated areas as drought conditions are expected to continue.The ban went into effect immediately and will remain until mid-July.The measure bans the sale and use of fireworks, including missile-type rockets, aerial spinners, roman candles and ground audible devices.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is suing a temporary staffing agency over allegations that it failed to address sexual harassment complaints made by four women who were assigned to the Albuquerque Police Department's records unit.The commission filed the lawsuit against Select Staffing in federal court Wednesday.

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Part 2 of a 6-part series

During the worst of the recession, new development ground to a halt and small businesses closed their doors on many Main Streets throughout the country.

That wasn't the case in Greenville, S.C. And while it seems improbable that a city would thrive during the recession, Greenville's mayor credits a mix of good luck and good fundamentals.

'Our Own Little Rockefeller Center'

The "nickel tour" of Greenville, population 58,000, starts at a window on the 10th floor of City Hall.

The brutal twin attacks in Norway last week by self-proclaimed Christian crusader Anders Behring Breivik have reignited an immigration debate in what had appeared to be the most serene multicultural society in Europe.‪ Norway's long-standing reputation as a welcoming haven for immigrants is being tested as its Muslim population grows.

Many immigrants live in the Oslo neighborhood of Greenland. There are a few indigenous Norwegians, but they rush by.‪ Many women shopping at grocery stores wear the hijab.‪

The government of Bahrain has invited a renowned international legal scholar to investigate what went on during mass protests in February and March, and the brutal crackdown on the largely Shiite opposition that ensued. More than 30 people died, hundreds were detained and beaten, and thousands were fired from their jobs.

The commission is headed by Cherif Bassiouni, an Egyptian-born legal expert who has investigated war crimes and human rights violations in the Balkans, Rwanda, Afghanistan and, most recently, Libya.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Very little has happened, as expected, and we begin our coverage with NPR's Ari Shapiro.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on what may be a new trend in the Arctic.

CHRISTOPHER JOYCE: It's peak field season right now for scientists who study the Arctic, like Michelle Mack.

In Libya, one of the most senior rebel commanders has been killed. Abdel-Fattah Younis did not die in battle against the forces of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi; apparently he was killed by someone on his own side.

The circumstances surrounding Younis' death are still unclear. But there are fears that his murder will deepen internal divisions in the rebel military leadership.

Steve Inskeep speaks with Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi, Libya.

Inskeep: What happened?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

We all know congressional negotiators are trying to balance party and ideology, principle and pragmatism. But negotiators are people, too, and psychology has some useful things to say about the ongoing debt-ceiling standoff. Here are some key ideas to keep in mind.

It may be cold up there in the Arctic, but that doesn't mean it doesn't burn. And as the planet gets warmer, tundra fires are not only becoming more common, they may also shift a huge amount of carbon from the soil into the atmosphere, a new study reports.

Back in 2007, lightning struck the remote North Slope of Alaska, igniting the largest fire to hit the region since modern recording began in the 1950s. The fire burned for nearly three months until snowfall finally put it out in October. It left behind a charred scar of 400 square miles — big enough to see from space.

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