KANW-FM

New Mexico News

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Authorities say a man accused of killing five people in a shooting rampage in northern New Mexico last month has twice attempted to escape from the Rio Arriba County jail and also assaulted a guard. County Sheriff James Lujan told the Santa Fe New Mexican (http://bit.ly/2vNuTMx) authorities are hoping to get 21-year-old Damian Herrera transferred to a New Mexico Department of Corrections facility. Lujan calls Herrera a danger and a menace to the county jail. Herrera remains held without bond as he faces five open counts of murder.

FARMINGTON, N.M. (AP) — The acting chief justice for the Navajo Nation is stepping down. The Daily Times of Farmington, New Mexico, reports the Navajo Nation Judicial Branch recently announced Allen Sloan is resigning at the end of July. Sloan told the Daily Times that health concerns prompted his retirement. Sloan, who is originally from Coalmine Canyon, Arizona, has worked with the branch for 28 years. He has been acting chief justice since July 2015.

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A shady deal in Santa Fe is drawing scrutiny because it's not a complete cover up. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports a $320,000-state-funded project that installed 94 prefabricated shade structures around New Mexico's capital is being criticized for not covering playground equipment or picnic tables. And depending on the time of day, the shade cast is minimal. Resident Elisa Boyles says the tent-like, 12-foot by 12-foot tarps mounted on metal poles were useless. That's because she says the structures don't seem to provide much shade where the kids play as intended.

FARMINGTON, N.M. (AP) — A fish that federal officials say was once widely known as the "salmon of the southwest" is showing signs of recovering its diminished population in the San Juan River basin. The Farmington Daily Times (http://bit.ly/2tzGbHu ) reported Monday scientists say they have found evidence the Colorado pikeminnow is reproducing in the San Juan River, and the offspring are surviving. This conclusion is based on data gathered last year following the spring peak release from Navajo Dam. A release by the U.S.

GALLUP, N.M. (AP) — The school district serving the Gallup area spent $90,000 successfully fending off a legal challenge to its decision to withhold documents associated with an investigation of a former superintendent. The Gallup Independent (https://goo.gl/RZlBna ) reports that Gallup-McKinley County Schools spent the money through May 31 on legal fees leading up to a judge's ruling that the documents sought by the newspaper were not public under the state Inspection of Public Records Act.

More News

Walk up the white steps of the front porch where Mary Jo and Mike Picklo live, and you'll see three rocking chairs and a pair of binoculars.

The couple bought their home on five acres in 2003 and planned to spend their golden years overlooking a vista of green farmland and thick trees in western Pennsylvania.

In this week's edition of our education news roundup, we take you from school vouchers to AP exams to community college.

Betsy DeVos speaks to American Legislative Exchange Council

Protests greeted the education secretary in Denver this week at her speech to the American Legislative Exchange Council. Her family has close ties to the organization, which brings together state legislators, free-market conservatives and corporate sponsors to write model bills that get adopted all over the country.

NPR reporters are returning to their hometowns this summer to find out how they've changed – from job prospects to schools and how people see their community and the country.

Once home to thriving timber and fishing industries, Gold Beach, Oregon now subsists on tourists and retirees looking for a quiet beach, a nice river trip and, in a few cases, marijuana.

I left Gold Beach after graduating from high school in 1985. Back then, it was a blue-collar town dominated by the timber industry.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Teddy bears, blankets, crayons, games and a safe place to sleep. New Mexico's top officials wanted to pack as much as possible into a new center designed to ease the trauma often experienced by children when authorities are forced to remove them from their homes and place them in state custody. Gov. Susana Martinez and Children, Youth and Families Secretary Monique Jacobson on Friday toured the center in Albuquerque. They showed off a brightly-colored play area and separate rooms for sleeping, relaxing and playing.

An al-Qaida-linked suspect who prosecutors say conspired to murder a Swedish cartoonist has been charged in federal court in Philadelphia, despite the Trump administration's vow that alleged terrorists would be tried in military courts.

Prosecutors say Ali Charaf Damache, 52, an Algerian-born Irish citizen also known as "Black Flag," was allegedly part of an Ireland-based cell that included Colleen R. LaRose, a Pennsylvania woman known as "Jihad Jane." LaRose pled guilty in a U.S. court in 2011 to conspiracy and terrorism-related crimes. She is serving a 10-year sentence.

As general sessions judge for White County, Tenn., Sam Benningfield says the vast majority of cases he hears are drug-related offenses. The opioid epidemic has hit the state especially hard — resulting in more than 1,400 drug overdose deaths there in 2015 alone, according to the CDC — and he felt that an unusual solution would be necessary to drive home the dangers of illegal drugs for would-be parents.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

On this program in 2014, Moziah Bridges told us about his dream.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

MOZIAH BRIDGES: I want to bring the bow tie back, and I want to make it look better than what it used to be.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Pages

Higher Education Town Hall

Is New Mexico's Higher Education System Sustainable?

KANW Provides Supplemental HD News & Entertainment Channel

KANW offers New Mexico’s first HD radio channel devoted to news, entertainment and information programming from NPR, Public Radio International, American Public Media, and the BBC.

KANW Vehicle Donation Program

Support Your Favorite Programs

KANW MemberCard Benefits

Your KANW MemberCard Entitles You to Hundreds of Discounts and Special Offers

“Who Guards the Guardians?”

Podcast of the Town Hall Meeting