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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Authorities have identified a man who was killed in a shooting involving Albuquerque police as a wanted ex-felon. A police spokesman said Friday the man has been confirmed to be Daniel Saavedra-Arreola. Gilbert Gallegos says Saavedra-Arreola had several aliases and served time in various correctional facilities. According to police, officers responding to a residential burglary call last Sunday were confronted by a suspect with a weapon. At least one officer opened fire, fatally wounding him. A task force is investigating the officer-involved shooting.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The former head of New Mexico's Martin Luther King Jr. Commission and two others have been indicted on numerous charges stemming from a lengthy investigation into allegations of financial impropriety. The indictments handed up Friday accuse former executive director Kimberly Greene of more than a dozen charges that include fraud, embezzlement, larceny, conspiracy and other counts. It wasn't immediately clear if Greene, who was removed by commissioners in 2016, had an attorney.

GALLUP, N.M. (AP) — The Navajo Nation will train its own police officers at its new Navajo Nation Police Academy. Navajo Nation Public Safety Director Jesse Delmar says no other tribe has its own police academy. Delmar says the Navajo Nation Police hired 20 recruits Wednesday who will be trained in Chinle, Arizona. They could begin training as soon as February. The Gallup Independent reports the Navajo academy will use curriculum based off of the Arizona Peace Officers Standards and Training curriculum.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez's proposal to grant broader immunity to police in use-of-force lawsuits is being met with criticism from attorneys and others on both sides of the debate. The Albuquerque Journal reports that Martinez plans to push for a measure during the upcoming legislative session that would provide somewhat of a legal shield for law enforcement officers sued for actions in the line of duty, so long as they were following their training. Albuquerque has reached settlements in a string of lawsuits in recent years over police shootings.

The New Mexico Supreme Court says prosecutors are not obligated to present live witness testimony at pretrial detention hearings. The ruling Thursday settles a question that had emerged among some prosecutors after voters approved a 2016 constitutional amendment to ensure dangerous or high-risk defendants awaiting trial remain incarcerated, and nonviolent suspects unable to afford bail are let go. Some prosecutors further complained that, in addition to being unclear, bail and pre-trial detention rules that justice crafted after the voters' decision haven't worked as intended.

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Jack Segal made his living booking novelty acts from the 1940s to the 1960s in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. There were more than 500 hotels and resorts in the region.

"He employed performers that the other agents would never use or couldn't even find, like the lilliputian stripper, blind xylophone player," Jack's son, Mort, tells his sister Joan Feldman while visiting StoryCorps in New York City.

Jack also had dog acts and the hotels would complain sometimes.

Part 2 of a 6-part series

During the worst of the recession, new development ground to a halt and small businesses closed their doors on many Main Streets throughout the country.

That wasn't the case in Greenville, S.C. And while it seems improbable that a city would thrive during the recession, Greenville's mayor credits a mix of good luck and good fundamentals.

'Our Own Little Rockefeller Center'

The "nickel tour" of Greenville, population 58,000, starts at a window on the 10th floor of City Hall.

The brutal twin attacks in Norway last week by self-proclaimed Christian crusader Anders Behring Breivik have reignited an immigration debate in what had appeared to be the most serene multicultural society in Europe.‪ Norway's long-standing reputation as a welcoming haven for immigrants is being tested as its Muslim population grows.

Many immigrants live in the Oslo neighborhood of Greenland. There are a few indigenous Norwegians, but they rush by.‪ Many women shopping at grocery stores wear the hijab.‪

The government of Bahrain has invited a renowned international legal scholar to investigate what went on during mass protests in February and March, and the brutal crackdown on the largely Shiite opposition that ensued. More than 30 people died, hundreds were detained and beaten, and thousands were fired from their jobs.

The commission is headed by Cherif Bassiouni, an Egyptian-born legal expert who has investigated war crimes and human rights violations in the Balkans, Rwanda, Afghanistan and, most recently, Libya.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Very little has happened, as expected, and we begin our coverage with NPR's Ari Shapiro.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on what may be a new trend in the Arctic.

CHRISTOPHER JOYCE: It's peak field season right now for scientists who study the Arctic, like Michelle Mack.

In Libya, one of the most senior rebel commanders has been killed. Abdel-Fattah Younis did not die in battle against the forces of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi; apparently he was killed by someone on his own side.

The circumstances surrounding Younis' death are still unclear. But there are fears that his murder will deepen internal divisions in the rebel military leadership.

Steve Inskeep speaks with Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi, Libya.

Inskeep: What happened?

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

We all know congressional negotiators are trying to balance party and ideology, principle and pragmatism. But negotiators are people, too, and psychology has some useful things to say about the ongoing debt-ceiling standoff. Here are some key ideas to keep in mind.

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