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New Mexico News

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Authorities have identified a man who was killed in a shooting involving Albuquerque police as a wanted ex-felon. A police spokesman said Friday the man has been confirmed to be Daniel Saavedra-Arreola. Gilbert Gallegos says Saavedra-Arreola had several aliases and served time in various correctional facilities. According to police, officers responding to a residential burglary call last Sunday were confronted by a suspect with a weapon. At least one officer opened fire, fatally wounding him. A task force is investigating the officer-involved shooting.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The former head of New Mexico's Martin Luther King Jr. Commission and two others have been indicted on numerous charges stemming from a lengthy investigation into allegations of financial impropriety. The indictments handed up Friday accuse former executive director Kimberly Greene of more than a dozen charges that include fraud, embezzlement, larceny, conspiracy and other counts. It wasn't immediately clear if Greene, who was removed by commissioners in 2016, had an attorney.

GALLUP, N.M. (AP) — The Navajo Nation will train its own police officers at its new Navajo Nation Police Academy. Navajo Nation Public Safety Director Jesse Delmar says no other tribe has its own police academy. Delmar says the Navajo Nation Police hired 20 recruits Wednesday who will be trained in Chinle, Arizona. They could begin training as soon as February. The Gallup Independent reports the Navajo academy will use curriculum based off of the Arizona Peace Officers Standards and Training curriculum.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez's proposal to grant broader immunity to police in use-of-force lawsuits is being met with criticism from attorneys and others on both sides of the debate. The Albuquerque Journal reports that Martinez plans to push for a measure during the upcoming legislative session that would provide somewhat of a legal shield for law enforcement officers sued for actions in the line of duty, so long as they were following their training. Albuquerque has reached settlements in a string of lawsuits in recent years over police shootings.

The New Mexico Supreme Court says prosecutors are not obligated to present live witness testimony at pretrial detention hearings. The ruling Thursday settles a question that had emerged among some prosecutors after voters approved a 2016 constitutional amendment to ensure dangerous or high-risk defendants awaiting trial remain incarcerated, and nonviolent suspects unable to afford bail are let go. Some prosecutors further complained that, in addition to being unclear, bail and pre-trial detention rules that justice crafted after the voters' decision haven't worked as intended.

More News

After 50 Years, Cuban Houses To Go Up For Sale

Jul 28, 2011

In the years after Fidel Castro's Cuban revolution, Havana's neighborhoods went through an extraordinary upheaval. As wealthy and middle-class families fled, poorer Cubans moved into their homes.

Now, communist authorities are preparing to legalize property sales for the first time in 50 years, and the city's old racial and class divisions are already creeping back.

House Hunting

Bombs In Norway Breaking Down Multiculturalism?

Jul 28, 2011

The confessed Norway attacker Anders Behring Breivik says he intended to send a "wake up call" to Europe, which he sees as being taken over by Muslims. The attacks are raising tensions about immigration and multiculturalism in Europe. Host Michel Martin explores this issue with an NPR correspondent based in Paris and the author of several books about Islam in Paris.

The Challenge Of Integrating Muslims Into Europe

Jul 28, 2011

Host Michel Martin continues her conversation about Europe's multiculturalism amid the deadly attacks in Norway, which Anders Behring Breivik has acknowledged committing. Martin hears from Paris-born journalist Nabila Ramdani and Eleanor Beardsley, an NPR Correspondent based in Paris.

Update at 11:57 a.m. ET:

The AP is now reporting confirmation from the FBI that Abdo had "items that could be identified as bomb-making components, including gunpowder" when he was arrested.

Our original post:

An AWOL soldier from Fort Campbell, Ky., has been arrested in Killeen, Texas, near Fort Hood. Army Pfc. Naser Abdo was being held Thursday, a day after his arrest by local police at a motel in the central Texas town.

Intelligence Chief: Norway Terror Suspect Is Lone Wolf

Jul 28, 2011

Norway's domestic intelligence chief told the AP that the man suspected of killing 76 people in a bombing and shooting rampage likely acted alone.

"It's a unique case. It's unique person. He is total evil," Janne Kristiansen, the director of the Norwegian Police Security Service told The Associated Press.

For several months, opposition troops have squared off against Moammar Gadhafi's forces on the ground in Libya. But for the most part, there's been only incremental movement along the front lines.

Is al-Qaida planning an attack to coincide with the tenth anniversary of September 11?

"Of course they'd like to," says national security analyst Peter Bergen. "And some of the materials recovered in the [Osama] bin Laden compound indicate a desire to do something. But a desire to do something is quite different than actual implementation. I think that this is a group that that has not only suffered the loss of its leader, but was already in very bad shape before that happened."

As the U.S. teeters closer to the brink of debt default, the political stalemate is being watched closely by its biggest foreign creditor, China. At last count, Beijing owned almost $1.2 trillion of U.S. Treasury debt.

Chinese officials have been quietly expressing their concern, but Beijing's options are limited.

As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met senior Chinese official Dai Bingguo in Shenzhen on Monday, the mood was friendly. But behind the scenes, anxiety in China is rising as the minutes tick closer toward that Aug. 2 deadline.

Writer's Mystery Endures, Long After He Vanished

Jul 25, 2011

Everett Ruess could have been one of this country's greatest wilderness writers, a poet and author on a par with John Muir or Edward Abbey.

But we'll never know for sure, because Ruess disappeared without a trace in November 1934. With two burros trailing behind him, he left the remote southern Utah town of Escalante, heading down the desolate Hole-in-the-Rock Trail towards the Colorado River in search of his favorite things: beauty and solitude.

About a week down the trail, Ruess ran into two sheepherders and camped with them for a couple of nights.

Reliving D-Day, With Paintballs And Referees

Jul 25, 2011

Thousands of people traveled to a field near Jim Thorpe, Pa., earlier this month to re-create one of the most famous battles in history: D-Day, the invasion of Normandy. But with live ammunition — paintballs — and no predetermined winner, it wasn't a typical re-enactment.

In the paintball world, the invasion of Normandy isn't just an event, it's the event.

"This is our Super Bowl," says Nicky Angel Valor.

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