6:35pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Sandy Makes Landfall Near Atlantic City

Robert Siegel talks with Associated Press correspondent Katie Zezima, who was in Atlantic City, N.J., close to where Sandy made landfall.

5:55pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Millions Without Power As Sandy Makes Landfall

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Already more than a million people from Maine to Virginia have lost electricity because of the storm. And in one case, as we heard a few minutes ago, the utility Consolidated Edison took the unusual step of cutting off power to parts of lower Manhattan. By the time the storm is over, more than 10 million homes and businesses in the eastern U.S. could lose electricity. That's according to the utility industry.

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4:36pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

Hurricane Sandy: The Scene From Kitty Hawk, N.C.

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 5:27 pm

The water in Kitty Hawk, N.C. rose quickly.
Doug Smith

Doug Smith and his girlfriend Trenor Bender thought the worst of Hurricane Sandy had passed them by when they looked out the windows in the wee hours today. At their rental home, three rows back from the beach in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, there was no water in the yard at all at 3:30 this morning. But that didn't last.

"When I woke up, I couldn't believe it," says Smith of the view just a few hours later, "I saw this sheet of water on the ground."

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4:14pm

Mon October 29, 2012
All Tech Considered

Why Is This Supercomputer So Superfast?

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 2:46 pm

Cray employees put the finishing touches on Titan at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The supercomputer may be the world's fastest. It's designed to do 20 petaflops — or 20,000 trillion calculations — each second. It consumes enough electricity to power a small city of 9,000 people.
Courtesy of Nvidia

The world's fastest supercomputers have come back to the U.S. In June, the title was claimed by a machine named Sequoia at Lawrence Livermore Labs. Monday, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, what could be an even faster computer comes online. It's called Titan and it would not have been possible were it not for the massive market for video games.

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3:48pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

Penguin, Random House Announce Merger

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 9:32 am

Bertelsmann and Pearson announced Monday that they were merging their book publishing arms, Random House and Penguin. The new firm will be called Penguin Random House.
Timur Emek dapd

There's big news in the world of publishing: The two conglomerates that own Random House and Penguin announced Monday that they were merging their book businesses to form a new company.

German media company Bertelsmann, the owner of Random House, will own 53 percent of the new firm, Penguin Random House; Pearson, which owns Penguin, will control the rest. The merger, subject to regulatory approval, is scheduled to be completed in the second half of 2013.

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2:53pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Risks Rise With Hurricane Sandy's Surge

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 6:17 am

Waves crashed over a road in Winthrop, Mass., as Hurricane Sandy moved toward coastal areas Monday.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Hurricane Sandy may be grinding closer to the East Coast with 90 mph winds and torrential rains, but the most devastating aspect is likely to be storm surge.

Simply put, storm surge is wind-driven water that is forced against the shore, piling up in low-lying areas where it can cause dangerous flooding. A number of factors can make storm surge worse: a massive storm with high winds headed straight for a region full of shallow coastal bays and inlets.

Sandy seems to have them all, says Chris Landsea, science and operations officer at the National Hurricane Center.

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2:42pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

Hurricane Sandy's Economic Impact Likely To Be Immense

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 3:12 pm

Waves crash over a road as Hurricane Sandy comes up the coast Monday in Winthrop, Mass. Economists are predicting the storm will cost tens of billions of dollars.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Economists will need many days — maybe weeks or months — to assess the financial harm being done by Hurricane Sandy. But whatever the final figure, it will be huge, well into the tens of billions of dollars.

More than 60 million Americans are feeling the impact of the weather monster slamming New York, New Jersey, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Virginia, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and many other states. The howling mix of wind, rain and snow is causing massive direct losses, i.e., the destruction of private homes, stores, boats and cars.

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2:38pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Want To Be Rich? Be Lucky, Know The Right People

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 9:42 am

Michael and Amy Tiemann estimate their personal wealth at about $25 million — and say luck played no small part in their financial success.
Art Silverman NPR

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, dependency and the role of government.

And while it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? And what do we think explains our prosperity — or lack thereof?

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2:38pm

Mon October 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Pew Poll: Race Evens Up, But Romney Holds Turnout Advantage

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 4:02 pm

Mitt Romney speaks Monday at a campaign event at Avon Lake High School in Avon Lake, Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

A poll released Monday by the Pew Research Center shows that President Obama has failed to regain much of the support he lost in the days after the first presidential debate.

The poll shows that among likely voters, the race is now a statistical dead heat with both Obama and Mitt Romney receiving 47 percent support. Among registered voters there is what Pew calls a "statistically insignificant two-point edge" of 47 percent to 45 percent for Obama.

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2:33pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Shots - Health News

After Smoking Is Banned, Heart Attacks Drop

When smoking is banned in bars and workplaces, the number of people who suffer heart attacks and die drops within months, according to two new studies.

They found benefits not only in saving lives, but in lowering the cost of medical care for heart attacks, stroke and other smoking-related illnesses. It's the best evidence yet demonstrating big, swift health improvements when secondhand smoke is banished.

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