4:03am

Sat September 15, 2012
World

Former Diplomat: Doing A Good Job Invites Risk

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 8:55 am

A portrait of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens is placed along with a condolence book at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Stevens and three other Americans were killed in an attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Tuesday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

When former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker heard about his colleague's death in Libya, his first reaction was disbelief. He had known Christopher Stevens for two decades.

"I ... just felt that punch in the stomach. He was a good friend. We're a pretty small tribe," he tells Weekend Edition host Scott Simon.

Read more

4:03am

Sat September 15, 2012
Europe

For Young Greeks, A Communal Escape From Woes

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 8:55 am

Apostolos Sianos, 31, quit his Web designer job in Athens to help establish the Telaithrion eco-commune. Here he mixes food for the commune's dogs.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Facing their country's worst recession in a half-century, many young Greeks are leaving for jobs abroad. But Apostolos Sianos, a 31-year-old Athenian, decided to buck the trend.

Two years ago, Sianos quit his lucrative job designing websites in Athens to help establish an eco-commune, called the Telaithrion Project, in Aghios, his family's ancestral village on the island of Evia. The idea was to teach people to be self-sufficient at a time when both money and opportunities are drying up.

Read more

4:01am

Sat September 15, 2012
Middle East

Reporter Hotline: What Awaits Abroad After Election

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:14 pm

Afghan soldiers (right) patrol with U.S. troops in the Panjwai district of southern Afghanistan in May. The two armies have been working together for years, but Afghan attacks against U.S. and NATO forces have been rising recently.
David Gilkey NPR

As we approach the presidential election in November, Weekend Edition is seeking your questions about issues and candidates in a new segment called Reporter Hotline. This week, we answer inquiries about foreign policy and U.S. involvement in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

Read more

4:01am

Sat September 15, 2012
Politics

Paul Ryan A Star Attraction For Values Voters

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 8:55 am

Paul Ryan addresses the Family Research Council Action Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., on Friday.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

In this election, Christian conservatives seem to be more against President Obama than they are for Mitt Romney. But they do like GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan, who used a speech Friday to vouch for Romney.

At the annual gathering of religious conservatives in Washington, D.C., there was also talk of this week's violence in the Middle East.

The Values Voter Summit got under way first thing Friday morning, with a speech from Tony Perkins, whose Family Research Council organizes this event.

Read more

3:41am

Sat September 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Anti-Japan Protests Erupt In China Over Disputed Islands

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 5:56 am

Protesters march outside the Japanese Embassy in Beijing on Saturday. Tension escalated, sometimes to violence, in cities across China after Japan bought the disputed islands from a private Japanese owner.
Louisa Lim NPR

It has been a day of rage on China's streets. The road outside the Japanese Embassy in Beijing was transformed into a sea of protesters, waving national flags, screaming invective.

Read more

4:11pm

Fri September 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Court Strikes Down Wis. Collective Bargaining Law Championed By Gov. Walker

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 5:22 pm

The controversial law that curbed the collective bargaining rights of public employees in Wisconsin has been struck down by Dane County Circuit Judge Juan Colas.

The law, if you remember, was championed by Gov. Scott Walker and it unleashed massive protests and even led to Democratic law makers to flee the state to forestall its passage. After it became law, union activists mobilized and triggered a recall vote, which Walker ultimately defeated.

Read more

4:09pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Around the Nation

Revisiting 'Life' Magazine's 'Take-Over Generation'

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 4:19 pm

Sept. 14, 1962, issue profiling promising young Americans of the time." href="/post/revisiting-life-magazines-take-over-generation" class="noexit lightbox">
Life magazine cover from the Sept. 14, 1962, issue profiling promising young Americans of the time.
LIFE©1962 Time Inc

Note: A shorter version of this story aired on your local member station.

Fifty years ago this month, Life magazine published its take on the 100 most promising young professionals of the midcentury. The special issue, titled "The Take-Over Generation," highlighted some of the "young movers and shakers of the country," Roy Rowan, the magazine's assistant managing editor at the time, tells reporter Richard L. Harris.

Read more

3:40pm

Fri September 14, 2012
It's All Politics

White House Details 2013 Cuts If Congress Doesn't Avert Fiscal Cliff

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 3:50 pm

The White House Friday released a report detailing, in part, what life would look like on the other side of the fiscal cliff, which could occur at the end of the year.

Under orders from Congress, the administration detailed exactly how it would administer painful cuts to both defense and domestic programs that were ordered under last year's budget deal.

Read more

3:36pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Education

New School Year Brings Tough Lessons In Spain

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 8:55 pm

Parents take their children to School No. 103 on the first day of the new school year in Valencia, Spain, on Sept. 7. Spanish students, parents and teachers are feeling the pinch of the ongoing European debt crisis.
Heino Kalis Reuters/Landov

Spain is slashing spending to try to avoid a European bailout, and one of the biggest victims of budget cuts has been public education. Schools across Spain reopened this week with bigger classes, fewer teachers and increased fees for things like school lunch and books — placing a heavy burden on many families.

Conchi Redondo blows kisses at her three daughters after dropping them off on the first day of school in Madrid, the Spanish capital. She smiles and waves at the girls, but privately, she's worried.

Read more

2:53pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

How Your Job Could Hurt Your Heart

Lack of control and high demands make work stressful.
iStockphoto.com

Stress on the job may raise your risk of a heart attack.

European researchers came to that conclusion after looking at the experience of nearly 200,000 people who took part in 13 different studies. The scientists found that people with stressful jobs had a 23 percent higher risk of heart attack than those whose jobs weren't pressure cookers.

Read more

Pages