3:07pm

Mon October 15, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney's Business Skills Evident In His Strong Debating Style

Mitt Romney at the first presidential debate at the University of Denver on Oct. 3.
Charlie Neibergall AP

If there was any surprise in the first 90-minute presidential debate, it was President Obama's apathetic performance, not Mitt Romney's energetic and assertive pounding of the commander in chief.

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2:55pm

Mon October 15, 2012
'Another Thing': Test Your Clever Skills

'Another Thing' Wraps With Songs Of Housework Woe

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 4:46 pm

iStockphoto.com

Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free-Range Kids, have brought you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. The contest wraps up this week with one final installment of listener responses.

Last week's challenge: A Norwegian study found that couples who split chores equally are more likely to divorce. Come up with the name of a country song about a chore-splitting couple.

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2:51pm

Mon October 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Bosnia Begins Work On First Census Since Its Bloody Civil War

July 11, 2012: A woman cried next to the coffin of her relative at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica. More than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were executed there in July 1995. It was the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Population censuses aren't normally something to get excited over. But for Bosnia, a nation that hasn't counted its own people in over two decades and has its eye on becoming part of the European Union, even a pilot census is of great importance. No formal national count has taken place since before the breakup of Yugoslavia, and the subsequent ethnic conflict that shocked the world.

Today, Bosnia began a two-week test census, targeting around 15,000 people, in order to gauge how prepared it is for an official, nation-wide census in the spring of 2013.

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2:26pm

Mon October 15, 2012
Shots - Health News

Wiping Out Polio: How The U.S. Snuffed Out A Killer

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 12:55 pm

On April 12, 1955, Dr. Jonas Salk and his research team at the University of Pittsburgh released the first successful vaccine for polio. In 1979, the U.S. reported its last case of the paralyzing virus.
Courtesy of Images from the History of Medicine (NLM).

Sixty years ago, polio was one of the most feared diseases in the U.S.

As the weather warmed up each year, panic over polio intensified. Late summer was dubbed "polio season." Public swimming pools were shut down. Movie theaters urged patrons not to sit too close together to avoid spreading the disease. Insurance companies started selling polio insurance for newborns.

The fear was well grounded. By the 1950s, polio had become one of the most serious communicable diseases among children in the United States.

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2:17pm

Mon October 15, 2012
Solve This

Candidates' Views On Poverty Get Little Attention

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 4:46 pm

People eat a free community meal at The Center in Lima, Ohio, earlier this year. Although more than 46 million Americans are poor, the issue has gotten little attention in the presidential race.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The nation's poverty rate is as high as it's been in almost two decades. Last year, 1 in 6 Americans was poor — more than 46 million people, including 16 million children.

But on the campaign trail, the issue of poverty has received surprisingly little attention.

When he first ran for president, Barack Obama went to a low-income neighborhood in Washington, D.C., and spoke passionately about hunger and poverty. He repeated Bobby Kennedy's question in 1967: "How can a country like this allow it?"

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2:08pm

Mon October 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Debate Preview: Romney Aide On How GOP Nominee Would Confront Iran

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 8:45 am

Dan Senor, a senior adviser to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Jason Reed Reuters /Landov
  • Romney adviser Dan Senor talking with NPR's Steve Inskeep

A President Mitt Romney would make the "military option" a credible threat in the effort to keep Iran from developing nuclear weapons by repeatedly saying that it "remains on the table, that it is real" and by making sure that senior officials don't imply otherwise, a top foreign policy adviser to the 2012 Republican presidential nominee tells Morning Edition.

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1:49pm

Mon October 15, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Girls Vaccinated For HPV Not More Likely To Be Sexually Active

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 12:49 pm

An 18-year-old girl winces as she has her third and final shot of the HPV vaccine.
John Amis AP

Giving the human papillomavirus vaccine to teenage girls doesn't increase the likelihood that they will be sexually active, according to a new study.

That may help put parents at ease; the notion of vaccinating 11- and 12-year-old girls for a sexually transmitted virus has made some uncomfortable, and is one reason why only a little more than half of teenage girls have had the vaccine.

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1:33pm

Mon October 15, 2012
The Salt

Jerusalem: A Love Letter To Food And Memories Of Home

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 4:46 pm

A boy chooses fruit from a stall as Jerusalem market vendors swirl around him.
Jonathan Lovekin Ten Speed Press

Jerusalem is known for its bitter politics, a divided city where decades of religious and political strife have torn away shared spaces. But as British-Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi tells NPR's Melissa Block, if there's one place in which Jerusalemites of all stripes still stand united, it's in their love of food.

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1:19pm

Mon October 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Citizen Scientists Discover A Strange Planet In Four-Star System

An artist's illustration of PH1, a planet discovered by volunteers from the Planet Hunters citizen science project. PH1, shown in the foreground, is a circumbinary planet and orbits two suns.
Haven Giguere Yale

The universe continues to surprise us. Two citizen scientists have discovered a very rare world: A planet that orbits two stars and has a second pair of stars revolving around it.

Wired explains just how odd this is:

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12:31pm

Mon October 15, 2012
The Two-Way

For About $20, Cardboard Bicycle Could 'Change The World,' Inventor Says

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 1:53 pm

Israeli inventor and his cardboard bicycle.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

Reuters today catches up on a story that's been getting some traction in recent weeks:

An Israeli inventor has come up with a way to make a bicycle almost entirely out of cardboard — and so inexpensively that he thinks retailers would only need to charge about $20 for one.

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