2:49am

Tue September 25, 2012
Around the Nation

Preservation Jazz Hall Band Releases 2 Albums

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now from the up and coming we turn to a band celebrating its 50th birthday.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: That's the sound of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, named for the Jazz House in the French Quarter where they play. To mark 50 years, the New Orleans group is releasing two albums today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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2:49am

Tue September 25, 2012
Business

Apple Runs Out Of Initial iPhone 5 Stock

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with: somebody restock the shelves.

Apple says it sold more than 5 million of its new iPhone 5s over the weekend. The company says it has now run out of its initial stock. On its debut weekend, the iPhone 5 sold better than the last version of the iPhone. But sales were not quite as strong as many analyst expectations, and there are concerns about Apple's ability to keep up with demand.

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2:41am

Tue September 25, 2012
NPR Story

Obama, Romney To Address Clinton Global Initiative

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

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2:41am

Tue September 25, 2012
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business comes from Tony the Tiger.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMERCIAL)

LEE MARSHALL: They're greeeaaat.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: A simple statement. But Tony may have to learn how to say it in Chinese because his parent company, Kellogg, just inked a deal with a firm in Singapore.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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1:29am

Tue September 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney's Medicaid Remarks On '60 Minutes' Raise Eyebrows

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:21 pm

Mitt Romney talks with 60 Minutes correspondent Scott Pelley.
AP

It's not so much what Mitt Romney said about whether the government should guarantee people health care in his interview on CBS's 60 Minutes Sunday that has health care policy types buzzing. It's how that compares to what he has said before.

To back up a bit, Scott Pelley asked the former Massachusetts governor if he thinks "the government has a responsibility to provide health care to the 50 million Americans who don't have it today?"

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1:28am

Tue September 25, 2012
Fine Art

Print-Inspired Art: All The News That's Fit To Paint

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

Alfredo Ramos Martinez painted Head of a Nun, tempera on newspaper, in 1934.
Gerard Vuilleumier The Alfredo Ramos Martinez Research Project, Reproduced by Permission

The print newspaper industry may be struggling, but newsprint is alive and well on the walls of a new exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The show is called "Shock of the News" — and it examines a century's worth of interaction between artists and the journals of their day.

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1:27am

Tue September 25, 2012
Business

Chicago Pits Quieter, But Traders' Outcries Linger

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 6:18 pm

Traders work in the bond pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in 1995. In recent decades, much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.
Michael S. Green AP

The trading pits at the Chicago Board of Trade and the Mercantile Exchange have long been potent symbols of American capitalism. And they used to be as rough and tumble as the city itself, where burly men bought and sold commodities like hogs, cattle, corn and soybeans.

Trading volume has gone up considerably in recent years, but Chicago's trading pits are tamer places today — the result of a revolution futures trading has undergone over the past quarter century. Much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.

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1:25am

Tue September 25, 2012
Around the Nation

Phone Home: Tech Draws Parents, College Kids Closer

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

University of North Carolina sophomore Julia-Scott Dawson (left) and her mother, Robin, use text-messaging, email and social media to stay in touch.
Courtesy of Robin Dawson

From breakfast to bedtime, college sophomore Julia-Scott Dawson and her mother, Robin Dawson, exchange a flurry of texts that include I love you's, inside jokes and casual chitchat.

"We talk every day," Dawson says.

"Every day," echoes her mother.

Julia-Scott Dawson is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina, which is just a 15-minute drive from where her parents live. Every week, she shares a Sunday meal with her family and grabs morning coffee with her parents when they can.

"I just love the time I spend with them," Dawson says.

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1:21am

Tue September 25, 2012
Asia

Americans In China Feel Pinch Of Shifting Economies

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

China has welcomed U.S. business expertise for many years as its economy has advanced rapidly. Jim Rogers, a prominent U.S. investor, is shown here in China at the 2nd Hunan Finance Expo in 2011. However, the Chinese are becoming more confident in their own business skills and more critical of American practices in recent years, according to U.S. business executives working in China.
ChinaFotoPress Getty Images

In recent years, China's status — like its economy — has continued to rise as the economies in America and Europe have struggled.

That shift isn't just reflected in economic numbers, and some American business people in China say they don't feel as respected or as valued as before.

Not long after Michael Fagle arrived in Shanghai in 2005 with DuPont, he went to visit a Chinese customer. Back then, Fagle says, he was treated as a sage from the West.

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1:19am

Tue September 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Doctors Sift Through Patients' Genomes To Solve Medical Mysteries

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 10:00 am

Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome.
Eric Kayne for NPR

Sara Terry's first clue that something was wrong with her son, Christian, came just three weeks after he was born.

"We went to check on him, just like any parents go and check on their kids just to make sure they're breathing," says Terry, 34, of Spring, Texas. "And we found him in his crib, and he wasn't breathing. He was blue."

She and her husband were horrified. They rushed Christian to the hospital and learned he had several medical problems.

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