2:41pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Record

Remembering Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher To Rock Stars (And Many More)

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:39 pm

British guitarist Bert Weedon died Friday at age 91.
Keystone Hulton Archive/Getty Images

2:41pm

Mon April 23, 2012
History

Discovery Sparks Interest In Forgotten Black Scholar

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:39 pm

Three years ago, Rufus McDonald found historic documents in an abandoned house and took them to a rare-books dealer. The papers and books belonged to Richard T. Greener, a 19th century intellectual who was the first African-American to graduate from Harvard University.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Three years ago, just moments before sledgehammers ripped through an abandoned home in Chicago, the head of a demolition crew decided to save the contents of an old steamer trunk stored in the attic.

"They were about to demolish it because they couldn't get it down the stairs," says Rufus McDonald, who gathered what was inside the steamer trunk — documents and old books — and took them to a rare-book dealer in Chicago.

"He said, 'Do you know who this is?' I said, 'Nah, who is it?' He said, 'It's Richard Theodore Greener," McDonald recalls. "I said, 'Who is he?' "

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2:18pm

Mon April 23, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Cancer Doc Brawley Says The U.S. Health Care System Is Sick

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 7:48 am

Otis Brawley, M.D., chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society.
Chris Hamilton American Cancer Society

Journalists make for a pretty tough crowd.

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2:01pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Salt

Are Local Salad Greens Safer Than Packaged Salad Greens?

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:23 am

Miller Farms in Maryland is a family-run operation that sells its home-grown vegetables at farmers' markets and local grocery stores. Phil Miller, whose family owns the farm, says he's trying to earn a food safety certification now required by many food buyers.
Maggie Starbard NPR

There were lots of comments on this blog regarding my recent stories about making salads safer. Many of those comments argued that the solution is to grow your own. Or at least buy from local farmers.

Which raises an interesting question: Are salad greens from your local farmer's market actually safer than packaged lettuce from thousands of miles away? And should the same safety rules apply to both?

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1:24pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Two-Way

7 Men Ask Judge To Overturn Convictions In Notorious D.C. Murder Case

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 1:39 pm

In 1985, Chris Turner was convicted of the murder of Catherine Fuller. After spending decades in prison, Turner is now out on parole; he maintains his innocence. He is shown here in his childhood neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., about 100 yards away from what was Fuller's home.
Amanda Steen NPR

Six men wearing bright orange prison jumpsuits appeared in a D.C. courtroom today, seeking to overturn their decades-old convictions in a brutal murder by arguing the Justice Department failed to turn over critical evidence that could have helped them assert their innocence.

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1:17pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Picture Show

Are Your Facebook Friends Really Your Friends?

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:51 am

Photographer Tanja Hollander is on a mission to make protraits of all of her Facebook friends.
Tanja Hollander

The new issue of The Atlantic asks: Is Facebook Making Us Lonely? The jury's out, though signs point to maybe.

Facebook didn't necessarily make Tanja Hollander lonely, per se, but it did make her curious. It was a little over two years ago when she looked at that number representing "friends," 626 in her case, and started to analyze it.

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12:12pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Trustees Warn Social Security Is Headed Toward Insolvency

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 2:37 pm

The trustees in charge of nation's Social Security program said a sagging economy has hit the program hard. The program's trust fund, which goes mostly to retirees, said the trustees, will run dry by 2033.

The AP reports "Medicare's finances have stabilized but the program's hospital insurance fund is still projected to run out of money in 2024."

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12:09pm

Mon April 23, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Backs Extension Of Student Loan Relief

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 1:08 pm

Mitt Romney on Monday endorsed the idea of extending a law that curbs interest rates paid by some recipients of federal student loans, a cause that President Obama has made a campaign issue.

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11:54am

Mon April 23, 2012
The Two-Way

AP Analysis: Half Of Recent College Grads Are Jobless Or Underemployed

Students from John Moores' University celebrate graduation.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

It's hard out there for a college grad.

The AP analyzed government data and came up with this stunning figure: "Half of young college graduates [are] either jobless or underemployed in positions that don't fully use their skills and knowledge."

The whole story is worth a read, so we encourage you to click over, but here is the meat of the AP's analysis:

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11:09am

Mon April 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Obama Announces New Sanctions Targeting Syria, Iran

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 11:13 am

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC.
Pool Getty Images

President Obama announced a set of new sanctions that target "Syria and Iran and the 'digital guns for hire' who help them oppress their people with surveillance software and monitoring technology," the AFP reports.

The president made the announcement during a visit to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. His visit was the first as president.

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