11:05am

Mon April 16, 2012
The Picture Show

You're Not Alone: Taxpayers Have Been Miserable For Decades

Alfred Eisenstaedt Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Misery loves company. Multitudes are no doubt making the last-minute scramble to finish taxes today. If that's the case for you, perhaps you can take solace in the fact that this tax misery is a long-lived American tradition.

Read more

11:00am

Mon April 16, 2012

10:21am

Mon April 16, 2012
The Salt

Is 'Tuna Scrape' The 'Pink Slime' Of Sushi?

Spicy tuna roll, or spicy tuna goo?
iStockphoto.com

The fact that there has been a salmonella outbreak among people who eat sushi isn't super surprising; raw seafood does pose more health risks than cooked fish.

But the fact that the fish implicated in the outbreak is something called "tuna scrape" sure got our attention here at The Salt.

According to the Food and Drug Administration's recall notice, tuna scrape is "tuna backmeat, which is specifically scraped off from the bones, and looks like a ground product." In other words, tuna hamburger.

Read more

10:00am

Mon April 16, 2012
Politics

Could Billionaire Koch Brothers Ruin Cato?

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 9:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we will tell you about a billion dollar settlement, years in the making, between the Justice Department and 41 Native American tribes, over what the tribes have called years of mismanagement of tribal money and resources. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes.

Read more

10:00am

Mon April 16, 2012
Governing

D.C. Mayor Says Residents Not Free

Monday is Emancipation Day in Washington, D.C. In 1862, more than 3,000 slaves in the nation's capital were freed. Host Michel Martin speaks with Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray about Emancipation Day, and why he says Washington still suffers from a type of slavery.

10:00am

Mon April 16, 2012
Law

Administration Bucks Precedent, Pays Out A Billion

The Justice Department and 41 Native American tribes recently announced a roughly $1 billion settlement. The agreement settles long-standing disputes over whether the federal government mismanaged tribal money and resources. Host Michel Martin speaks with Rob Capriccioso of Indian Country Today Media Network.

9:41am

Mon April 16, 2012
Music Reviews

Loudon Wainwright III Looks Back At His 'Old Man'

As Loudon Wainwright III says in his song "In C," he likes to sing about "my favorite protagonist — me."

Read more

9:26am

Mon April 16, 2012
Religion

Interpreting Shariah Law Across The Centuries

promo image of Mecca
iStockphoto.com

Sadakat Kadri is an English barrister, a Muslim by birth and a historian. His first book, The Trial, was an extensive survey of the Western criminal judicial system, detailing more than 4,000 years of courtroom antics.

Read more

9:15am

Mon April 16, 2012
The Two-Way

At Boston Marathon: Hot Temps And New Wheelchair Race Record

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 10:23 am

Before the start of the Boston Marathon this morning, a runner grabbed a bottle of water from among the hundreds lined up on a table in Hopkinton, Mass.
Stew Milne AP

The big story at today's Boston Marathon is the weather — in particular the bright, sunny skies and temperatures in the 80s that have race officials worried about how well some of the 27,000 registered runners will cope with the heat for 26.2 miles.

As the Boston Globe says, the medical tents are likely going to be quite busy today. And the Globe says that:

Read more

5:38am

Mon April 16, 2012
The Two-Way

Prosecutor Who Led Ill-Fated Ted Stevens Case To Leave Justice Department

A federal prosecutor who led the elite public integrity unit when the case against the late Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens collapsed has told associates he will leave the Justice Department.

Read more

Pages