1:00pm

Thu March 29, 2012
Health Care

What Happens If Affordable Care Act Is Cut By Court?

What happens to the provisions of the federal health care law if the Supreme Court throws it out entirely? Melissa Block discusses that with NPR health policy correspondent Julie Rovner.

12:51pm

Thu March 29, 2012
Asia

Headed For The Butcher, Chinese Dogs Are Rescued

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 6:06 pm

A volunteer feeds one of the dogs rescued from slaughter last December in a stand-off between animal rights activists and dog-meat sellers in central China. Such rescues have been taking place with some regularity in China.
Frank Langfitt NPR

To say that people in China eat dogs is something of a stereotype.

Sure, some still do, but these days, more and more Chinese are buying dogs as pets and treating them like beloved family members.

In the last year, that growing affection has taken a radical turn. Activists have begun stopping trucks along the highway carrying dogs to slaughter and then negotiating their release.

A Last-Minute Rescue

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12:38pm

Thu March 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Democrats Embrace 'ObamaCare' To Defang It

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 4:50 pm

Supporters of the health care law have recently embraced the term "Obamacare," a word they once recoiled from.
Charles Dharapak AP

A funny thing happened on the way to the Supreme Court and during the three days the court heard oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act. Democrats embraced the "Obamacare" name the law's foes had used as an epithet for two years to deride the law.

In the political equivalent of what happens in battle when the enemy's captured artillery piece is turned around and the opponent's own shells are fired back at them, Democrats decided to take ownership of a word they once seemed to avoid at all costs.

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12:21pm

Thu March 29, 2012
Election 2012

In Wisconsin, Recall Politics Overshadow Primary

Demonstrators cheer the effort to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker on Jan. 17 in Madison.
Andy Manis AP

Wisconsin holds its primary next Tuesday, but the Republican presidential candidates are having to work just to get voters' attention.

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12:10pm

Thu March 29, 2012
The Salt

What Is Community Supported Agriculture? The Answer Keeps Changing

A member of the community supported agriculture program at Congregation Shearith Israel picks from boxes of squash and cucumbers in Atlanta. Some purists say CSAs are drifting away from their roots.
John Amis AP

Community supported agriculture sounds so simple. Support a local farm, get to know your farmer, enjoy weekly deliveries of fresh produce, and rest easy knowing that you've voted for the local economy with your food dollars.

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12:04pm

Thu March 29, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Autism Rates Jump Again, As Diagnosis Improves

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 7:28 pm

Some children with autism have trouble speaking, and use images to help communicate.
iStockphoto.com

The number of children diagnosed with autism jumped 23 percent between 2006 and 2008, according to the latest federal estimate.

Now, 1 in 88 children has been diagnosed with autism, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The rapid rise prompted calls to declare the developmental disorder an epidemic. "This is a national emergency in need of a national plan," Mark Roithmayr, president of the advocacy group Autism Speaks, said at a CDC media briefing Thursday.

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12:02pm

Thu March 29, 2012
The Two-Way

After Controversy, Toulouse Gunman Buried In France

Originally published on Sun April 1, 2012 7:33 am

A sign on the ground marks the place for municipal workers to dig in Cornebarrieu cemetery, a Toulouse suburb in southwestern France.
Eric Cabanis AFP/Getty Images

At first, his family wanted the body of Mohamed Merah sent back to Algeria. Then after the country refused Merah's body, French authorities settled on burying him in Toulouse, where he was suspected of killing seven before he was shot and killed after a two-day siege of his apartment.

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12:00pm

Thu March 29, 2012
The Two-Way

Three Key Moments As Trayvon Martin's Story Went Viral

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 12:10 pm

Part of the awareness raising effort: the Justice for Trayvon Martin page on Facebook.
Facebook.com

What moved Trayvon Martin's Feb. 26 death from a local story to a national tale that has sparked a discussion about racial profiling and race relations?

Social media played a critical role. And there were key moments along the way.

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11:11am

Thu March 29, 2012
All Tech Considered

New Law Raises Funding Hopes For Startups, Worries Over Fraud

Would You Give This Guy Your Money? Space Monkey co-founder Alen Peacock delivers a presentation at the 2012 LAUNCH Festival in San Francisco. Peacock says that when he first got started, he couldn't accept investments from friends because they weren't accredited investors.
LAUNCH Media, LLC via Flickr

A new law has many technology entrepreneurs excited. The Jobs Act — which passed the House earlier this week and is awaiting President Obama's signature — will make it easier for new businesses to raise money. But many are concerned it will also open the floodgates to a new wave of financial fraud.

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11:06am

Thu March 29, 2012
The Fresh Air Interview

Earl Scruggs: The 2003 Fresh Air Interview

Earl Scruggs onstage in 2007.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Banjo player Earl Scruggs, who helped shape the sound of American bluegrass music, died Wednesday. He was 88 years old.

Scruggs' name is almost synonymous with the banjo — and for good reason. He helped pioneer bluegrass music with his three-finger style of banjo picking, a technique now known as "Scruggs style."

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