4:59am

Wed October 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Corn Maze Baffles Family Of Four

Bob Connors tells the Boston Globe he designed the seven-acre maze in Danvers, Mass., so people would get lost. Apparently it worked because a family of four became completely disoriented. In a final act of desperation, they called 911 from inside the maze.

4:56am

Wed October 12, 2011
History

World's Oldest Running Car Sells For $4.5 Million

In 1887, the French-made motor car La Marquise was in the first automobile race. It is still running. The car got a standing ovation when it was driven onstage at a recent auction, and a winning bid of more than $4.5 million.

2:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
Europe

Does Dexia's Collapse Herald A Wider Banking Crisis?

Until now, the eurozone debt crisis has been confined to countries on the continent's periphery — like Greece, Spain and Ireland. But that may be changing with the collapse of a bank at the core of the eurozone. While some call Franco-Belgian lender Dexia's demise an exception, others say it is a wake-up call for all European banks.

2:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
Economy

Economic Progress Lags For U.S. Born Children Of Mexican Immigrants

Since the last decade, there are now more Hispanic children of immigrants in the United States than actual immigrants. That should translate into more progress — educationally and economically. But Steve Trejo, an economist at the University of Texas at Austin, tells Renee Montagne that while the second generation does better than the first, the third generation doesn't fare as well.

2:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
Middle East

U.S.: Iran Behind Plot To Kill Saudi Envoy

Steve Inskeep talks with Iran expert Ray Takeyh of the Council on Foreign Relations about the criminal charges filed yesterday against two Iranians — one a naturalized U.S. citizen — accused of plotting to kill the Saudi Ambassador to Washington.

2:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

Hamas, Israel Reach Deal To Swap Prisoners

The Israeli government and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have agreed to a prisoner exchange. Hamas says Israel will free more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners in exchange for Gilad Schalit, the Israeli soldier captured by Hamas militants and held in Gaza for more than five years.

2:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

Fact Checking: Latest GOP Debate

Steve Inskeep and Bill Adair, editor of the non-partisan fact-checking web site Politifact.com, truth squad the latest Republican presidential debate held last night in Hanover, New Hampshire.

2:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 6:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's remember, now, a pioneer for gay rights. Yesterday, on National Coming Out Day, Frank Kameny died.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Mr. Kameny fought in World War II. He earned a PhD from Harvard. He landed a job with the U.S. Army Map Service. And then, in 1957, he was fired for being gay. Frank Kameny sued, and lost, and appealed, and lost. But this was still a landmark case. It was the first federal civil rights claim based on sexual orientation. He also organized a group called the Homophiles.

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12:32am

Wed October 12, 2011
Africa

Famine-Stricken Somalia Suffers From Aid Drought

Humanitarian groups are increasingly worried about the looming budget cuts in U.S. foreign assistance. They argue that lives are at stake, literally, in places like the Horn of Africa, which is suffering its worst drought in decades.

Raising public and private money for that has been a challenge in the current economic environment.

Hollywood stars and politicians have resorted to using the F word — in this case Famine — to get the attention of Americans about the humanitarian emergency in Somalia.

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10:01pm

Tue October 11, 2011
Research News

Pain At The Plate: Heat Increases Pitcher Retaliation

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 12:54 pm

Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers is hit by a pitch from the Tampa Bay Rays' James Shields on Oct. 1 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas.

Tom Pennington Getty Images

Richard Larrick has been bothered by something for two decades.

"Twenty years ago, I'd done a paper with some graduate students just showing that in hotter temperatures, pitchers are more likely to hit batters with pitches," says Larrick, a professor at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.

Was it because they would sweat more, and the ball might get slippery and hard to control? Or was it something intentional?

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