10:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

'The Banality Of Evil': Following The Steps To Sept. 11

Ten years ago Friday morning, the men who would become the Sept. 11 hijackers were ready. They woke up on Sept. 9, 2001, in small motels along the East Coast. Their leader, Mohammed Atta, was one of the last ones on the move. He was checking in with the teams on his way to Boston.

The White House counterterrorism chief, Richard Clarke, was also at work that day. He was watching something happening in al-Qaida email chatter — he just didn't know what.

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10:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

For U.S. Ambassador, A Decade On The Hot Seat

Ryan Crocker, the U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan (shown here in a file photo from July 2010), says that while he understands Americans' feeling of war fatigue, leaving Afghanistan would have a far worse consequence: "If we think the war is expensive — and it is — it is a lot cheaper than another 9/11."
Presidential Palace AP

Since Sept. 11, 2001, no U.S. diplomat has spent more time in more sensitive places than Ryan Crocker. He was ambassador to Pakistan as that country struggled with political turmoil and violence; he was ambassador to Iraq as the U.S. military surge changed the complexion of the war; and now he is ambassador to Afghanistan.

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10:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Business

Amazon Agrees To Collect State Tax In California

Amazon and California have reached a deal on sales taxes. The online retailing giant, which doesn't collect sales taxes in the state has agreed to start collecting them a year from now.

Amazon has long enjoyed a huge advantage by not collecting the tax — like brick-and-mortar stores do. Consumers pay that much less for the same goods.

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10:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Slain Priest: 'Bury His Heart, But Not His Love'

A mortally injured Father Mychal Judge is carried out of the World Trade Center by first responders, including Bill Cosgrove (in white shirt). Cosgrove says, "everybody you see in that picture was saved" from the North Tower's collapse, moments later.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters /Landov

Father Mychal Judge was a Franciscan friar and a chaplain to the New York City Fire Department. He was also a true New York character. Born in Brooklyn, Mychal Judge seemed to know everyone in the city, from the homeless to the mayor.

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Father Mychal arrived at the World Trade Center shortly after the first plane hit. And as firefighters and other rescue personnel ran into the North Tower, he went with them.

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10:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Port Authority Cops: Recovering From Sept. 11

Originally published on Fri September 9, 2011 6:01 am

Retired Port Authority Police officers Brian Patrick Tierney (left) and Kevin Devlin visited the World Trade Center site this week. Both men say it's been a struggle to adjust to normal life after losing friends and searching for remains at Ground Zero.
Chris Arnold NPR

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, inflicted the single greatest loss of life ever suffered by a police department in U.S. history. The department wasn't the New York Police — it was the less well-known Port Authority Police Department. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey polices the bridges and tunnels around New York, and it also was in charge of security at the Twin Towers. It's a small, tight-knit department, and it lost 37 officers that day.

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4:17pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Around the Nation

Nearly 100,000 Told To Flee Flooding

Nearly 100,000 people from New York to Maryland were ordered to flee the rising Susquehanna River on Thursday as the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee dumped more rain across the Northeast, closing major highways and socking areas still recovering from Hurricane Irene.

In downtown Binghamton, N.Y., water from the Susquehanna River flowed over retaining walls. In Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and the surrounding area, authorities ordered mandatory evacuations affecting 10,000 homes.

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4:00pm

Thu September 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Obama's Message: 'Stop The Political Circus,' Pass His Jobs Plan Now

President Obama plans to tell the nation tonight that there is "nothing controversial" in his latest jobs program and he's set to tell Congress that it should be passed "right away."

"The question is whether, in the face of an ongoing national crisis, we can stop the political circus and actually do something to help the economy; whether we can restore some of the fairness and security that has defined this nation since our beginning," Obama will also say, according to excerpts of his address that were just released by the White House.

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2:45pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Hair Straightener Contains Dangerous Chemicals, FDA Says

FDA says beware Brazilian Blowout
Inga Ivanova iStockphoto.com

Nearly a year ago, we warned you that a popular hair product which turns frizzy locks smooth and luxurious may be endangering the health of the salon workers who use it. Well, now the Food and Drug Administration has made it official.

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2:26pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Reporter's Notebook

Boy Scouts Look Forward To New Site

Christopher Lechalk, 11, and Matthew Lechalk, 14, of the Fayetteville, W.Va., Boy Scouts say they are looking forward to the new camp.
Noah Adams NPR

I spent a few days in Fayetteville, W.Va., while recording interviews about the new scout camp being built nearby. I found myself longing to talk to some actual Boy Scouts — kids from the area who would surely be eager to see what the scout leaders had in mind for the opening in July 2013.

So I sat on a back porch with George Lechalk, a scoutmaster, and his sons Christopher, 11, and Matthew, 14.

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2:16pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

For Young Afghans, History's Lessons Lost?

Afghanistan is a country of the young: According to best estimates, half the population was under age 10 when the Sept. 11 attacks took place a decade ago. Now, a generation of Afghans has very little knowledge about the events that so transformed their country. In this photo, Afghan children gather for school in Old Kabul, Aug. 25, 2010.
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

Afghanistan is, perhaps, the country most transformed by the Sept. 11 attacks. And yet most Afghans have no clear memories of those world-changing events because, according to best estimates, most of the country's current population was under the age of 10 at that time.

This generation of Afghans has gone from having no television or Internet to having access to a torrent of media information without much experience filtering truth from rumor.

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