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4:57pm

Tue July 22, 2014
The Two-Way

Flight MH17: U.S. Builds Its Case; Plane Wreckage Reportedly Cut Apart

Pro-Russian rebels move journalists away from Malaysian investigators and monitors from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe Tuesday. Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was allegedly shot down by a missile Thursday; today, U.S. intelligence says it has verified that two rebel leaders spoke by phone about shooting the plane down.
Rob Stothard Getty Images

American analysts say they've verified several pieces of evidence that show pro-Russian separatist rebels shot down Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, according to U.S. intelligence officials who briefed reporters Tuesday.

Here's a quick rundown of the officials' updates on what U.S. investigators have found, from notes taken by NPR's Pentagon reporter Tom Bowman:

  • A U.S. spy satellite detected the launch of a surface-to-air missile in the area just before the plane went down.
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4:51pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Environment

Maine City Council Votes To Keep Tar Sands Out Of Its Port

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 6:17 pm

The oil tanker HS Electra unloads oil from the North Sea at the Portland Pipe Line facility in South Portland, Maine, in 2013.
John Ewing Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

South Portland, Maine, is known as the place where Liberty ships were built by tens of thousands of workers during World War II. Now, the city's waterfront is home to an oil terminal and the beginning of a 236-mile-long pipeline.

For more than 70 years, the Portland Montreal Pipeline Corp. has pumped crude oil up through the pipeline, across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont, to be refined in Montreal.

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4:36pm

Tue July 22, 2014
It's All Politics

On Immigration, America's Concerns Are Fiery But Fleeting

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:28 pm

Police officers separate demonstrators on opposing sides of the immigration debate outside a U.S. Border Patrol station in Murrieta, Calif., on July 4.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Americans today are most likely to name immigration the nation's biggest problem, but polling history suggests the alarm may have a limited shelf life.

In a Gallup survey released last week, 17 percent volunteered immigration as America's most pressing issue, narrowly topping concerns that weigh more consistently on the nation's mindset, like jobs and political leadership.

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3:47pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Book Reviews

Book Review: 'Angels Make Their Hope Here'

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:18 pm

Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.

3:37pm

Tue July 22, 2014
The Two-Way

University Would Study Health Issues In Polluted New York Town

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:13 pm

A view of the Tonawanda Coke plant in Tonawanda, N.Y., which was found to have emitted carcinogens at levels many times higher than the state's limit.
John W. Poole NPR

Residents of an upstate New York town who've long associated their illnesses with the air they breathe may finally get some answers about the health effects of living next to a toxic polluter.

The town of Tonawanda lies in the shadow of Tonawanda Coke Corp., whose ovens heat coal into material used for the iron and steel industries, and release toxic chemicals into the air.

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3:23pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Around the Nation

D.C. Washington's Voice Shines On The Diamond In Nation's Capital

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:18 pm

During a recent visit to a Washington Nationals game, Robert Siegel was struck by the singer of the national anthem — by both his smooth baritone and his curiously apt name: D.C. Washington. So, he invited Washington into the studio for a conversation and a few songs.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Risk And Reason

Pop Quiz: 20 Percent Chance Of Rain. Do You Need An Umbrella?

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:04 pm

Will it rain or not? How you interpret the forecast could mean the difference between getting soaked or staying safe.
Maria Pavlova iStockphoto

This week, All Things Considered is exploring how people interpret probability. What does it mean to us, for example, when a doctor says an operation has a 70 percent chance of success?

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3:12pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Europe

Near Crash Site, Stories Of The Jet Cleave Closely To Russian Version

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:57 pm

Following the downing of the Malaysian airliner over eastern Ukraine, local residents have been talking about the event — but the picture is being distorted by a propaganda campaign in local media.

3:12pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Politics

VA Nominee Steps Before Senate Committee

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:18 pm

Robert McDonald, President Obama's nominee to run the troubled Department of Veterans Affairs, is appearing before the Senate for his confirmation hearing. He faces the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, which will vote on whether to send his nomination to the Senate floor.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:11pm

Tue July 22, 2014
The Salt

Glass Or No Glass? That Is The Grill Lid Question

A still from a video showing a glass top grill.
Schott Home Tech/YouTube

We love cooking on our grills, especially in the summertime. Keeping the house cool and avoiding the dish pile up are two major draws – not to mention the flavor of food cooked over fire.

When we saw a glass-topped grill, shining like Cinderella's slipper in a YouTube video posted by commercial glass maker SCHOTT, we were intrigued. But, we wondered, how the heck do you clean it?

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2:46pm

Tue July 22, 2014
The Two-Way

Tree Planted To Honor Beatle Is Killed By Beetles

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:13 pm

A tree planted in Los Angeles to honor former Beatle George Harrison grew to more than 12 feet tall before succumbing to a bark beetle infestation
AP

Flowers may grow so incredibly high, as the Beatles once sang, but trees — not so much.

Actually, a pine tree planted in Los Angeles a decade ago to honor former Beatle George Harrison reached a height of 12 feet before succumbing recently.

To an infestation. Of beetles.

"No one I think is in my tree" — a line from the song "Strawberry Fields Forever" — wouldn't seem to apply.

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2:29pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Economy

Inflation Came In Low Again, But Are There Bubbles?

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:39 pm

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on July 15. She said the Fed is likely to keep interest rates low "for a considerable period" since inflation remains so tame.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Want to borrow money for a car or a home this fall?

Oddly enough, the interest rates available months from now for big-ticket items may be determined by the prices you pay today for everyday consumer goods. When store prices are rising rapidly, policymakers start pushing interest rates higher, too.

But for the moment, at least, inflation appears mild enough to keep interest rates low for a long while.

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2:15pm

Tue July 22, 2014
The Two-Way

9/11 Commission Issues An Update On Anniversary Of Report

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 3:17 pm

Ten years after its landmark report on terrorism, the 9/11 Commission has released an update in which it notes continued problems. But in 2014, the dangers have shifted geographically — and online, the commission's former members say.

Noting that the world has changed "dramatically" since 2004, the report's authors write that "Al Qaeda–affiliated groups are now active in more countries than before 9/11."

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2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Europe

The Polish Case For Tougher Russia Sanctions

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 6:17 pm

In the wake of the Malaysian airliner's downing, many Europeans are now calling for tougher sanctions against Russia. Among them is Radek Sikorski, Poland's foreign minister, who explains to Robert Siegel why the West should ratchet up sanctions.

2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Recipes

A Spicy Take On An Old Standby: This Ketchup's Ripe For Return

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:18 pm

When life gives you tomatoes, make ketchup. With those fruits of the vine in high season, All Things Considered reaches into the archives for an heirloom tomato ketchup recipe, which produces a spicy sauce you'll likely not to find anywhere else.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Middle East

In A Crowded Gaza, A Growing Sense That Nowhere Is Safe

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:12 pm

Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.

2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Middle East

As Rockets Encroach, Israel's Main Airport Sees Canceled U.S. Flights

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:18 pm

U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.

2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Middle East

In Cairo, First Steps Taken On Gnarled Path To Gaza Cease-Fire

Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.

2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Africa

Amid CAR's Bloodshed, Thousands Dead And Little Help For The Living

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:18 pm

Sectarian violence erupted between Muslims and Christians in the Central African Republic just over a year ago. According to Sylvain Groulx of Doctors Without Borders, the conflict's casualty count is staggering: One in three families there have lost at least one family member.

2:14pm

Tue July 22, 2014
Law

Obama's Health Care Law Has A Confusing Day In Court

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:10 pm

Another wild legal ride for Obamacare on Tuesday: Two U.S. Court of Appeals panels issued conflicting decisions on an issue with the potential to gut the health care overhaul.

The two rulings could lead to another U.S. Supreme Court showdown over the controversial law, all because of what one of the law's opponents initially called "a glitch."

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