NPR News

Pages

9:37am

Thu July 28, 2011
The Two-Way

Intelligence Chief: Norway Terror Suspect Is Lone Wolf

Bomb and terror suspect Anders Behring Breivik leaves the courthouse in a police car in Oslo on July 25.
Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen AFP/Getty Images

Norway's domestic intelligence chief told the AP that the man suspected of killing 76 people in a bombing and shooting rampage likely acted alone.

"It's a unique case. It's unique person. He is total evil," Janne Kristiansen, the director of the Norwegian Police Security Service told The Associated Press.

Read more

9:04am

Thu July 28, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Reporting In Libya And Dodging Bullets, Bombs

A Libyan rebel fighter flashes a victory sign as an aircraft carrying supplies for the rebels departs along a guarded mile-long stretch of road being used as runway, outside of Rhybat in western Libya, on July 19.
Gaia Anderson AP

For several months, opposition troops have squared off against Moammar Gadhafi's forces on the ground in Libya. But for the most part, there's been only incremental movement along the front lines.

Read more

8:20am

Thu July 28, 2011
Asia

How Bin Laden's Death Has Affected Al-Qaida

Peter Bergen is CNN's national security analyst. His writing has appeared in The New York Times and Foreign Affairs, among others. The Longest War is his third book.
Scott Wallace

Is al-Qaida planning an attack to coincide with the tenth anniversary of September 11?

"Of course they'd like to," says national security analyst Peter Bergen. "And some of the materials recovered in the [Osama] bin Laden compound indicate a desire to do something. But a desire to do something is quite different than actual implementation. I think that this is a group that that has not only suffered the loss of its leader, but was already in very bad shape before that happened."

Read more

12:15pm

Wed July 27, 2011
Asia

China Fears U.S. Debt Default, But Has Few Options

As the U.S. teeters closer to the brink of debt default, the political stalemate is being watched closely by its biggest foreign creditor, China. At last count, Beijing owned almost $1.2 trillion of U.S. Treasury debt.

Chinese officials have been quietly expressing their concern, but Beijing's options are limited.

As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met senior Chinese official Dai Bingguo in Shenzhen on Monday, the mood was friendly. But behind the scenes, anxiety in China is rising as the minutes tick closer toward that Aug. 2 deadline.

Read more

12:29pm

Mon July 25, 2011
Author Interviews

Writer's Mystery Endures, Long After He Vanished

Everett Ruess was a young explorer, writer and artist who vanished in 1934 while hiking in the Utah desert.
Istockphoto.com

Everett Ruess could have been one of this country's greatest wilderness writers, a poet and author on a par with John Muir or Edward Abbey.

But we'll never know for sure, because Ruess disappeared without a trace in November 1934. With two burros trailing behind him, he left the remote southern Utah town of Escalante, heading down the desolate Hole-in-the-Rock Trail towards the Colorado River in search of his favorite things: beauty and solitude.

About a week down the trail, Ruess ran into two sheepherders and camped with them for a couple of nights.

Read more

7:53am

Mon July 25, 2011
History

Reliving D-Day, With Paintballs And Referees

Allied Gen. John Holme, aka "Mad Kow" (left), and Nicky Angel Valor are seen at the "Invasion of Normandy" paintball battle — the largest event of its kind in the world. "This is our Superbowl," Valor says.
Rob Sachs for NPR

Thousands of people traveled to a field near Jim Thorpe, Pa., earlier this month to re-create one of the most famous battles in history: D-Day, the invasion of Normandy. But with live ammunition — paintballs — and no predetermined winner, it wasn't a typical re-enactment.

In the paintball world, the invasion of Normandy isn't just an event, it's the event.

"This is our Super Bowl," says Nicky Angel Valor.

Read more

3:45pm

Fri July 22, 2011
Around the Nation

Honey, Stop The Car: Monuments That Move You

You know the feeling: You're driving and you spot a little-known memorial that makes you want to pull over and find out more. It could be a monument to some local hero or to a long-forgotten historical moment. NPR is taking a summer-long road trip and exploring the deep — and sometimes mysterious — histories of these spots. Click on the icons below to explore the series.

Read more

2:59am

Thu July 21, 2011
Business

Entrepreneur Bets On Happiness With Grilled Cheese

Entrepreneur Jonathan Kaplan, who created the Flip camera and sold it to Cisco, is opening a chain of grilled cheese restaurants in August.
The Melt

Jonathan Kaplan describes himself as a "serial entrepreneur." He started his first businesses when he was a kid, with a paper route, snow shoveling, then landscaping. He's had a printing company, and a DJ service, playing Sweet 16 parties and bar mitzvahs — all before Kaplan hit college.

He's picked up speed since then, founding several technology companies, including the one that created the Flip digital camera. He sold that to Cisco for more than $500 million. The company later discontinued the camera.

Read more

9:14am

Fri July 15, 2011
The Impact Of War Project

Military Dogs Enjoy Brighter Future After Service

Marine Cpl. Daniel Cornier and his colleague, Chaak, in Afghanistan. "Pretty much trust him with my life," Cornier says.
Courtesy of Daniel Cornier

The military's four-legged warriors now have a more hopeful future in store.

Military working dogs were once euthanized when their service days were over.

But, their fate is changing as military and civilian families pressure the Defense Department to make it easier for handlers to adopt their canine colleagues.

Looking out over Camp Pendleton's K-9 training field in California, Marine Cpl. Daniel Cornier shares stories about Chaak, the dog he deployed with to Afghanistan.

His words are halting and emotional.

Read more

8:16am

Mon October 5, 2009
Music Interviews

Rosanne Cash Runs Down Her Father's 'List'

Also an author, Rosanne Cash is working on a non-fiction book. She has previously written Bodies of Water and a children's book, Penelope Jane: A Fairy's Tale.
Rick Diamond Getty Images

When Rosanne Cash was 18, her father (you may have heard of him; some call him the Man in Black) presented her with a gift: a list of 100 essential country songs, chosen to help the budding singer-songwriter connect with and better understand the music that came before her.

Read more

Pages