NPR Staff

Pages

1:56am

Fri April 11, 2014
StoryCorps

One Man Becomes Another's Hands, Feet And Family

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 6:24 am

Ernest Greene (left) accompanied Collin Smith to college. When Collin graduated, the school awarded Ernest an honorary degree.
StoryCorps

When he was a high school sophomore, Collin Smith was in a car accident that left him a quadriplegic.

Ernest Greene, 50 years Collin's senior, had never met Collin, but he attended the same church. And when he heard about Collin's accident, he decided he wanted to help. He offered to do whatever Collin needed, from taking him to school to helping him shave. And when Collin began college, Ernest went too.

"What made you want to go to college with me?" Collin, now 23, asked Ernest in a visit to StoryCorps in Asheboro, N.C.

Read more

1:53am

Fri April 11, 2014
Paying For College

Paying Off Student Loans Puts A Dent In Wallets, And The Economy

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 7:38 am

Student loan debt forces many young adults to make hard choices about how they spend their money — and can prevent them from making investments that will pay off down the road.
David Sacks Getty Images

Weighing in at more than $1 trillion, student loan debt is now larger than total credit card debt. Morning Edition recently asked young adults about their biggest concerns, and more than two-thirds of respondents mentioned college debt. Many say they have put off marriage or buying a home because of the financial burden they took on as students.

Read more

3:28pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Found Recipes

Americans, Just Get Over It And Make The Souffle

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 10:41 am

Even one fluffy forkful of souffle is a worthy reward for making the effort.
Kelly Gorham Courtesy of Kelly Gorham Photography

The souffle shares this in common with some of nature's most vicious predators: It can sense fear. This, at least, according to noted American chef James Beard, who once observed, "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of it."

Read more

2:08pm

Thu April 10, 2014
News

Utah Gay Marriage Gets Hearing In Appeals Court

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Read more

2:08pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Science

A Peek Beneath A Mummy's Wrappers, Powered By CT Scanners

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Did you hear the one about the mummy who went to the hospital? Don't get all wrapped up trying to figure out the punch line, this is no joke. It's part of some groundbreaking research that will be on display at London's British Museum next month. The team there is using CT scans to uncover the ancient secrets of mummies.

John Taylor is curator at the British Museum. And he joined me earlier today to explain.

Read more

11:00am

Wed April 9, 2014
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: In An Online World, Are Brick And Mortar Colleges Obsolete?

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:18 pm

Two teams debated the value of online education in an Intelligence Squared U.S. event at Columbia University.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Online degree programs are proliferating – and many cost a fraction of the price of a traditional, on-campus degree. Massive Open Online Courses, known as MOOCS, are also catching on in the U.S. and around the world.

Read more

10:28am

Wed April 9, 2014
All Tech Considered

The New Age: Leaving Behind Everything, Or Nothing At All

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:48 pm

After Susan Sontag died in 2004, the writer's estate sold her letters, computers and other materials to UCLA for a special collection. Her biographer says the wealth of information can be daunting — and a bit eerie.
Jens-Ulrich Koch AFP/Getty Images

Perhaps in your attic or basement there is a box of papers — letters, photographs, cards, maybe even journals — inherited from a grandparent or other relative who's passed on. Authors, archivists and researchers have long considered these treasures. The right box might contain a wealth of information about a key historical period or place or person.

But what if that box isn't a box at all? What if it's an ancient laptop? And if we are starting to leave behind an increasingly digital inheritance, will it die as soon as the hard drive does?

Read more

2:23pm

Mon April 7, 2014
Deceptive Cadence

Two Leads, Two Deaths In 18 Hours

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 5:29 pm

Kristine Opolais made her Madama Butterfly debut as Cio-Cio-San, only to get a last-minute call to play Mimi in La Boheme.
Marty Sohl Metropolitan Opera

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

Read more

5:31pm

Sun April 6, 2014
Shots - Health News

How Public Health Advocates Are Trying To Reach Nonvaccinators

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 9:54 am

A school nurse prepares a vaccine against whooping cough before giving it to students at Mark Twain Middle School in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Whooping cough made a comeback in California last year, which researchers have linked to vaccine refusals. And with new measles outbreaks in Southern California, New York and British Columbia, the debate over vaccination is also spreading.

Read more

4:29pm

Sun April 6, 2014
World

Fighting For Rwanda's Justice In France

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:00 pm

Rwandan genocide-hunter Dafroza Gauthier on February 4, 2014 at the opening of the trial of Pascal Simbikangwa, Rwanda's former intelligence chief, charged with complicity in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
MARTIN BUREAU AFP/Getty Images

For more than a decade, Dafroza Gauthier and her husband, Alain, have hunted perpetrators of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. More than 800,000 people were killed in the genocide, most of them members of the Tutsi ethnic group.

Earlier this month, the couple gave testimony against former Rwandan intelligence chief Pascal Simbikangwa in Paris. On March 14, Simbikangwa was sentenced to 25 years in prison for complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity. His was the first Rwandan genocide trial to take place in France.

Read more

3:40pm

Sun April 6, 2014
Author Interviews

In Book's Trial Of U.S. Justice System, Wealth Gap Is Exhibit A

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 4:56 pm

Courtesy of Random House

Investigative journalist and author Matt Taibbi has long reported on American politics and business. With an old-school muckraker's nose for corruption, he examined the events leading up to the 2008 financial crisis in Griftopia. With Gonzo zeal, he described a two-party political system splintered into extreme factions in The Great Derangement.

And in his newest book, Taibbi sets out to explain what he thinks is a strange state of affairs:

Read more

10:31am

Sun April 6, 2014
Africa

Since Genocide, Rwanda's Women Have Helped Lead The Recovery

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:49 am

Rwanda is commemorating the 20-year anniversary of the genocide. Since that time, more women have entered politics to help with the recovery.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The Rwandan genocide left a deep and profound wound. It not only decimated the Rwandan people, it destroyed the nation's political and social structures.

In 1994, after the killing stopped, women made up 70 percent of the population.

They were needed to lead Rwanda's recovery. Rwandan women moved away from traditional roles and joined politics in unprecedented numbers.

Twenty years later, the Rwandan Parliament has more women than anywhere else in the world.

Read more

5:05pm

Sat April 5, 2014
Economy

Americans Are On The Move, But In The Wrong Direction

Moving to San Bernardino from Los Angeles may help with housing costs, but the area doesn't have much economic opportunity.
Reed Saxon AP

Jamika lives in a two-story apartment complex surrounded by a 10-foot-high security gate in San Bernardino, Calif. The yellow paint on the buildings' outside walls is peeling.

She doesn't want to use her full name. She doesn't want too many people to know about her situation.

Jamika and her siblings had to leave the house her family was renting in South Central L.A. when the property went into foreclosure. With money so tight, Jamika moved to San Bernardino, along with three of her siblings.

Read more

3:07pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Sports

Should The NCAA Change Its Rules To Pay For Play?

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:34 pm

University of Miami President Donna Shalala cuts down the net after a basketball game against Clemson last year.
J Pat Carter AP

In the next few days, the last four teams play for the NCAA men's basketball championship, a hugely profitable event for college sports.

Read more

2:02pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Author Interviews

In The 1870s And '80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 9:58 am

Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

We may think of baseball as America's national pastime, but in the 1870s and 1880s there was another sports craze sweeping the nation: competitive walking. "Watching people walk was America's favorite spectator sport," Matthew Algeo says in his new book, Pedestrianism.

Read more

2:16pm

Wed April 2, 2014
Author Interviews

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 7:54 pm

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

Read more

1:21am

Tue April 1, 2014
Parallels

Latvia's Ex-President: 'We Have To Worry' About Russia

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:45 am

Latvia's former president, Vaira Vike-Freiberga, is shown here at a NATO summit in 2006. During her presidency, Latvia joined both NATO and the European Union in 2004.
ROMAN KOKSAROV AP

Russia's takeover of Crimea sent shivers through Latvia.

The tiny Baltic state was itself taken over by the Soviet Union in 1940 and did not regain its independence until the Soviet breakup in 1991. Latvia has a population of just 2 million, and roughly a quarter of those are ethnic Russians.

Given this history, Latvia was eager to align itself with the West. In 2004, under then-president Vaira Vike-Freiberga, Latvia joined both the European Union and NATO and is counting on those allies for protection.

Read more

3:06pm

Sun March 30, 2014
Author Interviews

In Civilian Snapshot Of Iraq, An Artist Is A 'Corpse Washer'

Courtesy of Yale University Press

In his latest novel, Iraqi author Sinan Antoon gives readers a stark portrait of contemporary Iraq. Originally written in Arabic and translated into English by Antoon himself, The Corpse Washer was nominated for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize this year.

The book's protagonist is a young man named Jawad, an aspiring artist from a family of traditional Shiite corpse washers and shrouders in Baghdad. Jawad breaks from the family business and attends art school, where he devotes himself to the celebration of life rather than the ritual surrounding death.

Read more

3:06pm

Sun March 30, 2014
My Big Break

Cesar Millan's Long Walk To Becoming The 'Dog Whisperer'

Cesar Millan's television show Dog Whisperer on National Geographic debuted in 2004, but Millan previously spent years struggling to pursue a career as a dog trainer.
Robin Layton Courtesy of Cesar Millan

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Long before Cesar Millan became the "Dog Whisperer," with TV shows and a best-selling series of books, he had to learn how to ask for a job in English.

Read more

7:18am

Sun March 30, 2014
Education

What A Small Town's Teen Pregnancy Turnaround Can Teach The U.S.

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:57 am

Michelle Nimmons (with the red shoe) poses with some of the students in her sex education program in Denmark, S.C.
Courtesy of Michelle Nimmons

Thirty years ago, the small town of Denmark, S.C., had one of the state's highest teen pregnancy rates.

"We had very young grandparents, grandparents were maybe [in their] 30s," says Michelle Nimmons, who has worked for the past 30 years on the issue of teen pregnancy. "Great-grandmamas were in their 40s, and parents were in their teens, so a lot of education had to happen."

Read more

Pages