Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

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2:00am

Tue October 25, 2011
NPR Story

In Britain, A New Push To Leave EU

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 7:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

The European Union created a huge single market and stability for a continent that was ravaged by terrible wars during the 20th century. Now, in the 21st century, the European debt crisis has some eurozone members pushing to get out of the club. This all came to a head in Britain yesterday, where Parliament voted on whether to hold a public referendum on leaving the union.

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5:02am

Thu October 6, 2011
Europe

How Belgium Mirrors Europe's Economic Divide

Belgium has spent 16 months struggling to form a federal government. Observers say that issue is a microcosm of the financial crisis that has hit the eurozone.

2:00am

Tue September 27, 2011
World

Eurozone's Looming Financial Crisis

For a long time, much of the world saw the eurozone sovereign debt crisis as Europe's problem. Now world leaders, including the United States, realize a eurozone meltdown could have dire consequences for everyone. They are working up a massive rescue plan whose contours are beginning to emerge. Although Britain does not use the euro, that nation's politicians are using their party conventions to issue dire warnings about the euro's fate. And one eminent economist is proposing a novel solution to limit the impact of the European debt crisis.

2:00am

Wed September 21, 2011
Europe

What Would A Greek Default Mean To Europe?

Financial analysts speculate that Greece will default on some, or all, of its national debt. NPR's Philip Reeves reports on the likely international impact of such a default, particularly if Greece is forced to leave the group of countries using the euro currency.

2:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Europe

Eurozone Crisis Threatens To Destroy European Union

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 4:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Pressure is growing on European leaders to do something they've made it really, really plain they hate to do.

GREENE: For all the billions they've committed to propping up the Greek economy, it may still not be enough, and Greece's trouble has led to questions about Italy and even France.

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2:00am

Tue September 13, 2011
Business

British Banks Face Most Radical Overhaul In Decades

Britain is set to radically overhaul its financial laws. Officials say it's an attempt to prevent taxpayers from ever having to spend tens of billions of dollars to save banks from collapse.

2:00am

Wed August 17, 2011
World

Greenlanders Divided On Arctic Oil, Gas Exploration

This week we are looking at the fast-changing region of the Arctic, which is believed to have vast oil and gas reserves — and other mineral riches, too. Mineral companies are looking for them, and the region's people are watching anxiously — wondering what change we'll mean for them.

4:27am

Tue August 9, 2011
Europe

London Faces 3 Straight Nights Of Arson, Looting

London saw the worst violence and disorder in decades Monday night. It was the third night of unrest in that city. Trouble is also spreading to other parts of Britain – to Birmingham, Liverpool and Bristol. Prime Minister David Cameron has cut short his vacation in Italy to try to deal with the crisis.

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