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Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The head of Oxfam says the humanitarian group will appoint an independent commission to investigate claims that its staff engaged in sexual exploitation while working in disaster zones.

In an interview with the BBC, Oxfam International Executive Director Winnie Byanyima said the commission would "do justice" and "atone for the past."

A scandal that erupted last week in Australia over an affair between Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and one of his female staffers has devolved into an open conflict between Joyce and Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull that threatens to take down the coalition government.

In an extraordinary news conference on Thursday, Turnbull announced a ban on government ministers having sex with staff amid pressure over Joyce to step down over the affair with his former press secretary, Vikki Campion.

Thousands gathered for a candlelight vigil in Parkland, Fla., to honor the memory of the 17 people killed on Wednesday when a gunman opened fire at a local high school.

There were tearful remembrances at the Pine Trails Park Amphitheater, as well as open sobbing, and at one point, some in the crowd erupted into a chant of "No more guns!"

A bichon frise named Flynn was the surprise pick for best in show at the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York, taking honors as the nation's top dog.

According to The Associated Press, "Fans who had been loudly shouting for their favorites fell into stunned silence when judge Betty-Anne Stenmark announced her choice."

Flynn led the pack among 2,882 canine competitors representing 202 breeds and varieties.

Updated at 4:05 a.m. ET

A punishing series of U.S.-led coalition airstrikes in Syria last week reportedly killed an unknown number of Russian mercenaries fighting on behalf of the Damascus regime, with some sources saying there were "dozens" of casualties.

The Pentagon says a counterattack aimed at defending U.S. forces in the oil-rich Deir el-Zour province a week ago went on for more than three hours and involved B-52 strategic bombers, AC-130 gunships, F-15E attack planes, Apache attack helicopters and Reaper drones.

The African National Congress, South Africa's ruling party, has voted to "recall" President Jacob Zuma. The ANC has tried for weeks to get Zuma, whose term expires next year, to resign following allegations of corruption.

The party wants him to cede leadership either to Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, who was selected in December to replace Zuma as head of the party, or to a caretaker president.

Drugmakers gave millions of dollars to pain-treatment advocacy groups over a five-year period beginning in 2012, in effect promoting opioids to individuals most vulnerable to addiction, according to a new report released Monday by a U.S. senator.

Much of northern Puerto Rico that had seen power finally restored months after Hurricane Maria, was in darkness again on Sunday following an explosion and fire at an electrical substation.

The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, says several areas are without power, after an explosion and fire at the substation in Monacillo on the outskirts of the capital, San Juan.

NPR's Adrian Florido, reporting from San Juan, says the blackout affects the heavily populated northern part of the island after the explosion that occurred at about 9 p.m. Sunday.

Vice President Pence, who will lead the U.S. delegation at the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang on Friday, says he is prepared to announce the "toughest" economic sanctions yet on North Korea.

At the start of a six-day visit to Japan and South Korea, the vice president said the U.S. "will soon unveil the toughest and most aggressive round of economic sanctions on North Korea ever — and we will continue to isolate North Korea until it abandons its nuclear and ballistic missile programs once and for all."

After weeks of talks and months of political wrangling, German Chancellor Angela Merkel has finally emerged with a deal to form a new governing coalition following inconclusive parliamentary polls in September that left her ruling center-right Christian Democratic Union and its partners in limbo.

The deal Wednesday morning between the CDU and coalition partners, the Christian Social Union (CSU) and the Social Democrats (SPD) ensures that Merkel, who has already served for more than 12 years, will get another term in office.

President Trump has weighed in on the death of Indianapolis Colts linebacker Edwin Jackson, who was killed over the weekend in a suspected drunken-driving accident involving a Guatemalan citizen living in the U.S. illegally.

Steve Wynn, whose casinos have reshaped skylines as far apart as Las Vegas and Macau, has stepped down as head of Wynn Resorts following accusations of sexual misconduct, that became known last month.

In a statement released by the Las Vegas-based company late Tuesday, Wynn pushed back on the accusations against him, which he alleges are part of a campaign led by his ex-wife.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET

Asian and European markets tumbled Tuesday after dizzying losses on Wall Street that saw the Dow Jones industrial average shed 4.6 percent, its biggest loss in six and a half years.

In Europe, where the trading day was in full swing, the London's FTSE 100, Germany's DAX 30 and France's CAC 40 were all trending down.

In Asia, where the exchanges had all closed:

Thirty-two Russian athletes are appealing to the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport to lift their doping bans and allow them to compete in Pyeongchang, just days before the opening ceremonies in South Korea.

The appeal comes after the International Olympic Committee's decision in December to disqualify Russia from competing at the Winter Games, citing evidence of systematic, state-sponsored doping at Sochi in 2014.

A Wisconsin girl who pleaded guilty to stabbing a classmate as part of a bizarre attempt to gain favor with a fictional Internet character has been ordered committed to a mental institution for 40 years, the maximum penalty sought by prosecutors.

Four migrants have been shot in a gunfight that broke out between Afghan and Eritrean migrants in France's port city of Calais.

Reports differ on the conditions of the four wounded — The Associated Press says that all four were seriously hurt in the two-hour brawl, but France 24 reports that only one is in critical condition after the fight, involving hundreds of migrants "who had been queueing for food handouts."

A federal judge has declared unconstitutional Florida's procedure for restoring voting rights to felons who have served their time.

In a strongly worded ruling seen as a rebuke of Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who is the lead defendant in the case, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker said the disenfranchisement of felons who have served their time is "nonsensical" and a violation of the First and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Editor's note: This post contains graphic descriptions that some may find disturbing.

Updated at 3:50 a.m. ET

The Associated Press on Wednesday published a report detailing the existence of several previously undisclosed mass graves of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar along with shocking details of the systematic execution of victims and attempts to hide evidence of the crime.

The decision by Bill Nye to attend the State of the Union Address alongside the Trump administration's nominee to head NASA has put the celebrity science educator at odds with many scientists.

Nye, who starred in the children's program Bill Nye the Science Guy and now has his own Netflix original series, Bill Nye Saves the World is also CEO of the Planetary Society.

Updated at 6:10 a.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday signed an executive order to keep open the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, after pledging during the campaign to "load it up with some bad dudes."

The U.S. State Department is calling out Moscow after what it describes as a dangerously close pass by a Russian fighter jet near a U.S. Navy reconnaissance plane over the Black Sea.

"As confirmed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe, a Russian [Su-27] engaged in an unsafe interaction with a U.S. EP-3 in international airspace, with the Russia pilot closing to within 5 feet and crossing directly in front of the EP-3's flight path," State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said in a statement Monday.

At least seven survivors from a ferry that sank more than a week ago near the Pacific island-nation of Kirabati have been rescued from a small dinghy.

New Zealand's military found the survivors aboard a wooden dinghy after the 56-foot catamaran ferry MV Butiraoi went missing. The vessel was originally thought to be carrying 50 passengers and crew; however, Kirabati President Taneti Mamau later said that up to 100 people may have been aboard.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was briefly detained Sunday after a scuffle with police, who seized him amid protests in various cities calling for a boycott of the March 18 presidential election.

Navalny — a prominent Putin critic and anti-corruption campaigner who leads the country's Progressive Party and has been disqualified from running for president — was wrestled to the ground by police near a demonstration at Moscow's Pushkin Square.

Lewis D'Vorkin, the embattled editor in chief of The Los Angeles Times, is being replaced by veteran Chicago journalist Jim Kirk in a dramatic shakeup at the newspaper that follows weeks of tumult in the newsroom.

The newspaper's parent, Chicago-based Tronc, confirmed the move late Sunday. Kirk, 52, who joined Tronc in August, is a former editor and publisher of The Chicago Sun-Times who briefly served as interim editor at the Times ahead of D'Vorkin's appointment less than five months ago.

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