Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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10:21am

Wed July 25, 2012
Economy

When It Comes To Tax Cuts, Neither Side Is Blinking

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 12:43 pm

Taxes may be certain, but growth and job creation aren't.

As the U.S. edges closer to a year-end "fiscal cliff," Democrats and Republicans haven't budged in their fight over expiring tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans — and how best to help the middle class and get the country back to work.

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2:20pm

Mon July 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Penn State Sanctions Charter 'Unprecedented' Ground, Author Says

NCAA President Mark Emmert answers questions about the sanctions against Penn State's football team during a news conference in Indianapolis, Monday, July 23, 2012. The NCAA slammed Penn State with an unprecedented series of penalties in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.
Michael Conroy AP

The sanctions slapped on Penn State football in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal charter a new territory in punishment by the NCAA, a sports author said today.

"I think it is unprecedented in terms of taking away wins. That's a huge blow," says Ted Kluck, author of several books on sports, including Game Time: Inside College Football.

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2:03pm

Mon July 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Who 'Owns' The Bush Tax Cuts?

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:53 pm

They're called the Bush tax cuts for a reason. And when they were passed in the early 2000s, most Democrats opposed them.

Cut to a decade later: President Obama is calling for a second extension in as many years of the "temporary" cuts, but it won't come without a fight from congressional Republicans.

Given the apparent role reversal, who owns the George W. Bush-era tax cuts now: Democrats or Republicans?

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1:07pm

Fri July 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Yahoo, Facebook Reportedly In Ad Deal

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 1:52 pm

Yahoo and Facebook have agreed to re-sheath their patent swords and play nice — at least for now.

The two companies have struck a broad advertising partnership as part of a deal to end a patent dispute, Kara Swisher reports on the technology blog All Things Digital, quoting "sources close to the situation."

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2:02pm

Thu June 28, 2012
Law

Roberts Sheds Aura Of Predictability With Ruling

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 12:32 pm

People wait in line for passes to enter the court.
David Goldman AP

After Chief Justice John Roberts read the Supreme Court's majority opinion Thursday that upheld the Affordable Care Act, the reaction from conservatives was predictable and strong. But Roberts is far from the first justice to act in unexpected ways.

Justices don't always turn out the way presidents (and commentators) might hope. President Dwight D. Eisenhower famously said his appointment of Chief Justice Earl Warren "was the biggest damn fool thing I ever did."

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2:09pm

Wed June 27, 2012
Presidential Race

Translating The Veepstakes

David McNew Getty Images

Running for president means spending a lot of time convincing the public that you really want the job. Not so if you're seeking the No. 2 spot.

The road to the vice presidency, history shows, is paved with feigned disinterest.

"If you're going to be vice president, you're going to be in the president's shadow," says Jody Baumgartner, a political science professor at East Carolina University. "If you appear to be seeking the vice presidency, drawing attention to yourself, that's not really a quality that a presidential candidate is looking for."

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1:03pm

Mon June 25, 2012
Law

Immigration Ruling May Close, Open Legal Windows

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:16 am

Arizona Republican Gov. Jan Brewer leaves a podium at the state Capitol in Phoenix after responding to President Obama's immigration speech on June 15. Brewer said the speech represented a "pre-emptive strike" aimed at what then was an upcoming Supreme Court ruling on Arizona's immigration law.
Matt York AP

The Supreme Court's decision to strike down much of Arizona's immigration law is being hailed as a victory by both sides in a fight likely to spawn many more legal battles.

Monday, the court struck down three of four provisions in the law but upheld, at least for the moment, a controversial measure allowing police to check the immigration status of anyone stopped or detained for any reason.

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3:03pm

Fri June 22, 2012
Business

The Downside To Owning Your Own Island

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:41 pm

It's great to have your own private island like this one in the Caribbean, unless there's a hurricane bearing down.
Christian Wheatley iStockphoto.com

Who hasn't dreamed of having their own coral-fringed island, lounging on its sandy beach, coconut daiquiri in hand?

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6:52am

Fri June 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Breivik's Defense Asks For Acquittal

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 7:51 am

In this picture taken through bullet proof glass, mass killer Anders Behring Breivik looks on as he arrives for his trial in room 250 of Oslo's central court on June 21, 2012.
Daniel Sannum Lauten AFP/Getty Images

On the final day of confessed Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik's trial, the defense is trying to portray him as an ideologically driven political militant rather than a delusional madman in hopes of getting a lighter sentence or an outright acquittal.

Breivik, 33, an anti-Muslim extremist, has admitted to the bombing and shooting that killed 77 people in the capital Oslo.

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6:44am

Fri June 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Taliban Attack Kills 21 At Lakeside Resort Near Kabul

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 11:01 am

A general view of the Spozhmai Hotel following an attack by Taliban militants on the outskirts of Kabul on Friday.
Qais Usyan AFP/Getty Images

Heavily armed Taliban insurgents attacked a lakefront resort near Kabul overnight, killing at least 21 people during an assault and 12-hour standoff with combined Afghan and NATO forces.

The attack occurred at the Spozhmai Hotel on Lake Qargha, a popular recreation area for upscale Afghans just outside the capital. The Taliban claim they attacked because it was used by wealthy Afghans and foreigners to engage in "immoral activities."

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8:28am

Thu June 21, 2012
Space

A Final Voyage, Into The Wild Black Yonder

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 2:16 pm

An artist's rendering shows one of NASA's twin Voyager spacecrafts, which launched in 1977.
NASA via AP

When Voyager I and II left Earth, Jimmy Carter was president, platform shoes were all the rage and moviegoers were still discovering a summer blockbuster called Star Wars.

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2:29am

Wed June 13, 2012
Politics

Why The Farm Bill's Provisions Will Matter To You

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 10:49 am

Dairy cows feed on a farm in Chilton, Wis., in May. The farm bill being considered by Congress, part of a massive package that could cost nearly $1 trillion over a decade, contains a number of provisions affecting dairies.
Carrie Antlfinger AP

If you think only farmers care about the farm bill currently being considered by Congress, you're very, very mistaken.

The measure will not only set policy and spending for the nation's farms for years to come, but it will also affect dozens of other seemingly unrelated programs — all at a cost of nearly $1 trillion over the next decade. Following are a few questions and answers about the massive legislation:

Why is it called the farm bill, and where did it come from?

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10:55am

Thu June 7, 2012
Economy

Generation Rent: Slamming Door Of Homeownership

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 12:07 pm

Neal Coleman and his wife, Rachel, are both in their mid-20s and attend graduate school at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. They say renting makes more sense for them and their young daughter until their family is a bit more settled.
Courtesy of Neal Coleman

Kristi Taylor can pinpoint the precise moment she let go of the dream of homeownership. It was a few months ago, as she and her husband and infant son were driving through a neighborhood of homes near their apartment in Athens, Ga.

"As we were passing through, I realized that I don't really look at houses like I used to, when we would point out homes and say, 'That can be ours someday,' " says Taylor, who is 28. Now, she says, "the idea of homeownership is so vague, it doesn't even strike me as something that's in our future."

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2:07pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Politics

What Wisconsin's Recall Means For Labor Unions

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 3:06 pm

Rick Muir, president of the Indiana Federation of Teachers, chanted with other protesters at the Statehouse in Indianapolis in February 2011 over legislation limiting collective bargaining for teachers. Months later, it became law.
AJ Mast AP

The Wisconsin recall election might have failed, but it succeeded in sending an ominous message to pro-labor forces across the nation — especially in the Midwest, where a handful of legislatures are pushing to roll back collective bargaining and other union rights.

The vote against Republican Gov. Scott Walker was prompted by his support for a law limiting collective bargaining for some public sector employees. His victory Tuesday night could embolden governors in states such as Ohio, Indiana and Missouri to push back harder on labor rights.

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10:49am

Tue June 5, 2012
The Two-Way

How The Transit Of Venus Helped Unlock The Universe

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 7:46 am

The planet Venus is seen crossing the sun in June 2004 as photographed through a telescope at Planetarium Urania in Hove, Belgium. The earliest known observation of such a transit was in 1639 by English astronomer Jeremiah Horrocks.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

In an age when the size of the observable universe is known to a few decimal places, today's Transit of Venus offers a good opportunity to reflect on just how far we've come.

(For viewing information, click here.)

Less than 250 years ago, the brightest minds of the Enlightenment were stumped over how far the Earth is from the sun. The transits of the 1760s helped answer that question, providing a virtual yardstick for the universe.

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2:15pm

Fri June 1, 2012
The Two-Way

As The Worm Turns: Cybersecurity Expert Tracks Blowback From Stuxnet

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant, shown in this International Iran Photo Agency image from August 2010, was infected by the Stuxnet computer worm — which reportedly was created in the United States.
Ebrahim Norouzi AP

The CIA has a term called "blowback" to describe when an operation against the enemy has unintended negative consequences for the U.S. or its allies. In the age of cyberwarfare, blowback seems to be a paramount concern.

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12:32pm

Fri June 1, 2012
The Two-Way

For New Jersey Shoppers, No More Sales Tax Holiday On Amazon

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 1:51 pm

An Amazon worker grabs boxes off a conveyor belt in Nevada, one of a handful of states in which the online retailer collects sales tax.
Scott Sady AP

It might seem counterintuitive that Amazon is doing a deal with New Jersey to build two distribution centers in exchange for collecting sales tax on purchases made in the Garden State starting July 1, 2013.

After all, the free lunch enjoyed by many consumers as they shop tax-free online is one of the huge draws, right?

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7:18am

Fri May 11, 2012
The Two-Way

JPMorgan 'Rogue Trader' Losses Send Chills Through Markets

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 9:46 am

"It was a bad strategy. It was badly executed."

The words of JPMorgan Chase's CEO, Jamie Dimon, as he admitted late yesterday that the investment bank — or, more precisely, a single "rogue trader" working for the bank, had lost some $2 billion in the last six weeks in risky hedge-fund trades.

The news has sent chills through the markets. Shares of JPMorgan Chase, the largest U.S. bank, lost 7 percent in after-hours trading and British bank Barclays lost 2.9 percent, while more than 2 percent was shaved from Royal Bank of Scotland.

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8:33am

Thu May 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Putin Cancels Visit To U.S., Meeting With Obama

Russia's newly reinstalled President Vladimir Putin will be too busy with affairs at home to make a planned visit to the United States this month, where he was to have a high-profile tête-à-tête with President Obama and attend the G8 summit.

In his place, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, who swapped places with Putin in recent elections, will go to the global economic summit.

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8:33am

Thu May 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Chinese Activist Tells Of 'Crazy Retaliation' Against His Family

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 6:10 am

Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng says his family is being hounded by local authorities in his Shandong, his home province, with his brother and sister-in-law placed under house arrest and his nephew detained.

Chen's flight last month from house arrest and his request for refuge from U.S. diplomats has caused considerable embarrassment for Chinese authorities and threatened to damage U.S.-Sino relations. Since then, Beijing has agreed in a face-saving move to allow the blind, self-taught legal activist and his immediate family to study in the United States.

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