All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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3:07pm

Tue September 18, 2012
Presidential Race

Romney Conflated Different Groups With '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney admits he could've used more elegant language, but he's not backing down. Romney was secretly recorded speaking at a fundraiser in May and his comments were publicized yesterday by the liberal magazine, "Mother Jones." Here he is telling wealthy backers that President Obama has a built-in base of support.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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1:33pm

Tue September 18, 2012
Theater

Shorts Inspire Music In 'Sounding Beckett' Trilogy

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:09 pm

In Ohio Impromptu, one of three short plays featured in Sounding Beckett, the silent character (Philip Goodwin, left, with Ted van Griethuysen) inspired music based on knocks and repetitions.
Jeremy Tressler Sounding Beckett

It all began last year, when the Library of Congress presented Samuel Beckett's Ohio Impromptu alongside a piece of music by composer Dina Koston, which responded to the text. A New York group, the Cygnus Ensemble, played the music, while Washington, D.C., director Joy Zinoman staged the play, for one night only.

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12:58pm

Tue September 18, 2012
Music Reviews

Two Attempts To Turn Summer Platinum Into Fall Gold

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:47 am

Carly Rae Jepsen and the cover of Kanye West's latest album, Cruel Summer.
Vanessa Heins Courtesy of Universal Music Group

11:55am

Tue September 18, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Botswana Doctors Stop Cervical Cancer With A Vinegar Swab

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 11:56 am

Doreen Ramogola-Masire, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Botswana, hopes that a simple, quick screen for cervical cancer with vinegar will catch the disease early and save women's lives.
Jason Beaubien NPR

In the U.S., the pap smear has become a routine part of women's health care, and it's dramatically reduced cervical cancer deaths. But in Africa and other impoverished regions, few women get pap smears because the countries lack the laboratories and other resources necessary to offer them.

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4:39pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Presidential Race

Romney Disparages Obama Voters In Hidden Video

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now to a development surrounding Mitt Romney's campaign. After several days of stumbles on the trail and internal squabbling spilling into public view, Romney's campaign vowed to get back to substance today. Romney delivered a speech to a Latino group in Los Angeles today touting his economic plan and touching on immigration. But the spotlight was stolen by a report on the website Mother Jones.

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4:27pm

Mon September 17, 2012
'Another Thing': Test Your Clever Skills

'Another Thing': Obie The Dachshund's Big Slim-Down

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:57 am

iStockphoto.com

Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free-Range Kids, bring you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. We take a trend in the news and challenge you to help us satirize it with a song title, a movie name or something else wacky.

This week's challenge: The owner of a 77-pound dachshund named Obie is blogging about her efforts to slim him down by 40 pounds. If she succeeds, we can probably expect a book.

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3:53pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Middle East

As Sanctions Take A Toll, Debate In Iran Heats Up

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:41 pm

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech in Tehran in July. Khamenei says Western-led sanctions will not force Iran to change its policies, but there are signs of other concerned voices in Iran.
AP

Yukiya Amano is frustrated.

Last week, Amano, the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, told a meeting of the agency in Vienna that he is aggravated by Iran's unwillingness to show the IAEA what's going on at a base called Parchin.

"Iran should engage with us without further delay on the substance of our concerns," he said. "We need to stop going around in circles, discussing process."

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3:33pm

Mon September 17, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama, Romney In Tug Of War Over China Trade

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 4:04 pm

Shipping containers sit at a port in Tianjin, China, on Feb. 28.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

President Obama kicked off the week in the battleground state of Ohio, where he spent much of the time Monday talking about China.

His administration filed a new trade complaint against China with the World Trade Organization on Monday. The White House is challenging Chinese subsidies for auto parts.

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3:05pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Presidential Race

Obama Files New Trade Complaint Against China

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. We begin this hour with President Obama on the campaign trail. He was in the battleground state of Ohio today, but he spent much of his time talking about China. President Obama even announced a new trade complaint against China during a campaign stop in Cincinnati.

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3:03pm

Mon September 17, 2012
All Tech Considered

Singapore's Rising Tech Industry Draws Expat Innovators And Investors

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

Andrew Roth is co-founder of Perx, a Singapore-based firm that uses smartphones as virtual loyalty cards.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

For the past six years in a row, the World Bank has rated the Southeast Asian city-state of Singapore as the easiest place in the world to do business. Drawn in part by this reputation, money and talent are pouring into the island nation's growing technology sector.

One of Facebook's co-founders recently renounced his American citizenship and relocated to Singapore, where he has been investing in tech startups.

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2:31pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Reporter's Notebook

For Liberian Youth, A Creative Outlet In Krumping

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

Franklyn Dunbar, 17, practices krumping with his crew at his mother's house in Paynesville, a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia. Dunbar was born in New York, but moved to his home country of Liberia seven years ago.
Tamasin Ford NPR

The music starts up, masking the blare of the generator needed to power the stereo. The dancers begin, and almost like a relay, they take turns showing their moves. Their bodies shake and contort to the beat. Their eyes are fixed in a stare with a fierce look of anger as they lose themselves in the music.

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2:25pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Medicaid Helps Washington, D.C., Clinic Care For Ex-Prisoners

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

A Unity Health Care patient gets his ears checked.
Unity Health Care

Dr. Ilse Levin specializes in internal medicine, but you could say she really focuses on incarceration medicine.

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2:16pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Science

What Drove Early Man Across Globe? Climate Change

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

An artist's re-creation of the first human migration to North America from across the Bering Sea.
DEA Picture Library De Agostini/Getty Images

Anthropologists believe early humans evolved in Africa and then moved out from there in successive waves. However, what drove their migrations has been a matter of conjecture.

One new explanation is climate change.

Anthropologist Anders Erikkson of Cambridge University in England says the first few hardy humans who left Africa might've gone earlier but couldn't. Northeastern Africa — the only route to Asia and beyond — was literally a no man's land.

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2:09pm

Mon September 17, 2012
The Salt

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:42 pm

A lonely Michigan apple.
Noah Adams NPR

An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but what do you do when there are no apples? It's a question western Michigan's apple growers are dealing with this season after strange weather earlier in the year decimated the state's apple cultivation.

Michigan is the third-largest apple producer in the U.S. after New York and Washington, but the state's apples will soon be in short supply. Now in the middle of harvest season, growers are picking only 10 percent to 15 percent of their normal crop.

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9:29am

Mon September 17, 2012
The Picture Show

Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

Here's a snapshot from the field as Harrington composed his image of Burnside Bridge — which involved schlepping the huge, fragile camera down a steep incline to get the right perspective.
Claire O'Neill (@clairevoyant) Instagram

Believe it or not, there's a lot of food involved in wet-plate photography. Egg whites (albumen) are used to make the glass plates adhesive to the light-sensitive chemicals. And one way to keep the plates from drying out after processing is to coat them in honey. It's also physically demanding, so you get really hungry.

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2:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Politics

Could SuperPACS Shift Strategy To Congress?

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 7:50 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Polls can be unstable. Up until the last moment, Jimmy Carter was leading Ronald Reagan in 1980. And in the past two weeks, President Obama has started to pull ahead of Mitt Romney.

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2:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Arts & Life

A Reminder, Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Is Open

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 7:50 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Just a reminder now that Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction Contest is open. It's where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, so no more than 600 words. In each round, we have a judge with a new challenge. And this time, it's novelist Brad Meltzer, and he's come up with this.

BRAD MELTZER: Your story must revolve around a U.S. president who can be fictional or real.

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2:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Politics

Another Convention, This For Political Cartoonists

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 7:50 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just tuning in, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

A very important, somewhat political convention took place here in Washington this past week.

STEVE KELLEY: Fantastic. Oops. I hit the little button again. If you hit the button here...

RAZ: It was on the campus of George Washington University where we found New Orleans Times Picayune cartoonist Steve Kelley trying out a digital drawing board.

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1:50pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Around the Nation

Activists Make Push To Get IDs To Pa. Voters

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 7:50 am

Gloria Gilman holds a sign Thursday in Philadelphia during the NAACP voter ID rally to demonstrate her opposition to Pennsylvania's new voter identification law.
Michael Perez AP

Pennsylvania's politically split Supreme Court is considering a challenge to a lower court ruling that upheld the state's polarizing voter identification law.

The law requires a state-issued photo ID card to vote, and supporters say it will help prevent voter fraud. Voting-rights activists have now shifted strategies from attempting to overturn the law, to instead putting up to a million state-issued photo ID cards in the hands of residents.

State officials recently estimated it is possible nearly 200,000 Philadelphia residents alone don't have proper ID.

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1:09pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Politics

Rabbi Shmuley Wants To Bring Shalom To The House

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:08 pm

We've heard much about big money pouring into some of the congressional races around the country, and now some of that money is breathing new life into the campaign of one unlikely candidate.

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, author of books such as Kosher Sex and Kosher Jesus, and the host of Shalom in the Home, a reality show that worked with struggling couples, is running for Congress in New Jersey's 9th District.

Boteach is hoping to unseat Democrat Bill Pascrell in a district that is overwhelmingly Democratic.

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