All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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4:00pm

Tue August 7, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Trail, A Campaign's Style Can Reveal A Lot About Substance

President Obama delivers remarks at a campaign event on July 5 in Parma, Ohio.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

While President Obama and Mitt Romney offer competing visions every day on the campaign trail, there's also a more superficial aspect to their campaigns.

And on the surface, Obama and Romney events feel completely different.

Take a recent summer night in Leesburg, Va. Dorothy Fontaine had been standing outside of a local high school since the sun was high in the sky.

When asked why she would spend that much time waiting, Fontaine replied: "It's the president of the United States! I mean, isn't it cool to go see the president of the United States?"

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4:00pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Books

A Comics Crusader Takes On The Digital Future

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 12:40 pm

A panel from part one of Insufferable, the first title offered by the comics website Thrillbent.com. The site's creator, comic-book writer Mark Waid, hopes it will redefine comics in the era of smartphones and tablets.
Courtesy of Thrillbent.com

He wouldn't make the claim himself, but when it comes to comic-book writers, Mark Waid is one of the greats.

"I've pretty much hit all of the pop culture bases," Waid says, surrounded by comic-book memorabilia in his Los Angeles home. Batman, Spider-Man and even The Incredibles have all had adventures dreamed up by Waid.

"Jan. 26, 1979, was the most important day of my life," Waid says. "Because that's the day that I saw Superman: The Movie. I came out of it knowing that no matter what the rest of my life was going to be like, it had to involve Superman somehow."

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2:48pm

Tue August 7, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Wu-Where? Opportunities Shift To China's New Cities

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 7:00 pm

Wuhan's newest attraction is Han Street, a shopping complex that stretches several football fields, features fancy faux European architecture, and is filled with stores featuring foreign brands from Dairy Queen to Zara.
Frank Langfitt NPR

China became a majority urban country this year. No nation has shifted so quickly from rural to urban than China, where more than half of the people now live in urban areas.

Everyone is familiar with megacities like Beijing and Shanghai, but they are just a tiny part of China's urbanization story. The country has more than 160 cities with populations of a million or more — places most of the world is only vaguely familiar with, if at all.

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2:27pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Would-Be Parents Wait As Foreign Adoptions Plunge

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 1:15 pm

Mike Cannata with 2-year-old Bella. Mike and his wife, Barb, brought Bella home from Bulgaria this past spring after spending five years attempting to adopt.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

When Barb and Mike Cannata adopted their first daughter from China almost a decade ago, the process was smooth and relatively quick — just 17 months from start to finish.

Now a chatty and confident 9-year-old, Emma is an accomplished equestrian with her show horse, Ajax. But the family had trouble explaining to Emma why it took so long to get her a little sister.

When the Cannatas decided to adopt again in 2007, Barb Cannata says, everything had changed. They ruled out China early on.

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2:09pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Destination Art

Stratford's Big Stars, From The Bard To The Bieb

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 4:00 pm

The Festival Theater in Stratford, Ontario, is the main venue for the town's annual Stratford Shakespeare Festival. The town lies on the Avon River — just like Shakespeare's British birthplace — and had schools named after Romeo and Juliet before the festival started in 1953.
Richard Bain Stratford Shakespeare Festival

Most theaters let audiences know the show is about to start by blinking the lights. Stratford's Festival Theater in Stratford, Ontario, is a bit more festive. Four burgundy-uniformed buglers and a drummer quicken the pace of hundreds of theatergoers who've been ambling up the hill from the banks of the Avon River. When curtain time arrives, a cannon will boom.

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2:04pm

Tue August 7, 2012
The Salt

Outsourced Croissants Outrage Traditional French Bakers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:07 am

A woman walks into Boulangerie Cauvet in Paris, where they still make croissants from scratch.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

There's always a line at the Boulangerie Cauvet on the corner of rue St. Charles in Paris's 15th district. In their family owned bakery, Esmeralda Cauvet and her husband Cyril sell around 800 croissants and 3,500 baguettes a day.

In the kitchen, head pastry maker Pierre Gibert still rolls his croissants from triangular strips of dough. "The key to a good croissant is good ingredients and a high quality dough. You have to knead it, let it rise and roll it a second time in butter. That's what gives a croissant its flaky quality," Gibert says.

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1:55pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Mom And Dad's Record Collection

Leonard Pitts On Memories Of Laundry And Nat King Cole

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 1:04 pm

Nat King Cole (center) rehearses with his trio at the London Palladium in 1950.
Ron Case Getty Images

The Mom and Dad's Record Collection series on All Things Considered continues with a memory of music and family from the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and author Leonard Pitts.

Pitts says his childhood mischief was set to the music of Nat King Cole, often courtesy of his mother's own voice. One afternoon, he remembers, she was singing "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" while he played out back.

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12:55pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Africa

Mali In Crisis Fractures Along Twin Fault Lines

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 4:10 pm

Militiaman from the Ansar Dine radical Islamic group ride on an armed vehicle between Gao and Kidal in northeastern Mali in June. Jihadists currently control the country's north.
Adama Diarra Reuters/Landov

A rebellion in northern Mali, followed by a military coup in the south, has shattered the veneer of stability in a country that was hailed for 20 years as a model democracy in turbulent West Africa.

Now Mali is facing twin crises, prompting regional and international fears that the north — currently controlled by jihadists — is a terrorist safe haven. And the politicians who are meant to be fixing the problems are bickering.

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12:11pm

Tue August 7, 2012
The Record

Marvin Hamlisch, Movie And Broadway Composer, Has Died

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:22 pm

Marvin Hamlisch (left) with Liza Minnelli and Barry Manilow in 1987.
Time & Life Pictures Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

4:17pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Environment

Are Recent Heat Waves A Result Of Climate Change?

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:51 pm

Cattle use a tree for shade as temperatures rose above 100 degrees in a pasture July 28, 2011, near Canadian, Texas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The last couple of years have certainly felt unusually hot in many parts of the U.S., but are they really all that unusual?

Many people wonder whether a warming climate is turning up the temperature or whether it's all just part of the normal variation in the weather. Among scientists, there's a growing view that these latest heat waves are indeed a result of climate change.

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3:57pm

Mon August 6, 2012
It's All Politics

Dressage Enthusiasts Find Romney-Driven Attention A Mixed Blessing

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:44 pm

Jan Ebeling rides Rafalca in the equestrian dressage competition at the 2012 Summer Olympics on Aug. 2. Rafalca is co-owned by Ann Romney, the wife of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Markus Schreiber AP

3:56pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Middle East

Security Breach Tests Egypt's New President

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 7:43 am

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi (shown here July 2) has said that he'll restore the country's security within his first 100 days in office.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

The bodies of 16 slain Egyptian soldiers are being prepared for burial, a day after 35 gunmen ambushed their border post in the Sinai Peninsula. The incident in northern Sinai is proving to be the biggest challenge for Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi since he assumed office about a month ago.

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3:56pm

Mon August 6, 2012
It's All Politics

For July, Romney Fundraising Outpaces Obama Yet Again

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:45 pm

Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds this month in Golden, Colo.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

In July, the financial fortunes of the presidential candidates continued along their new trajectories, with Republican Mitt Romney's money-raising efforts outpacing President Obama once again.

Indeed, groups supporting Romney raised one-third more than Obama's re-election effort for the month.

Romney, the all-but-official Republican nominee, actually collected less in July than he had in June, but only slightly. His campaign announced Monday that its overall take for July was $101.3 million.

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3:22pm

Mon August 6, 2012
All Tech Considered

New Moo-Bile App Helps Keep Cows Cool And Farmers Updated

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:44 pm

Dairy cows feed at Heins Family Farm near Higginsville, Mo. Fans and misters keep the barns cool during this summer's record temperatures.
Scott Pham for NPR

When it's hot and humid, you probably don't want to move much and aren't very hungry. The same goes for cows; but when they don't eat, farmers lose money.

Researchers at the University of Missouri think they can help avoid those losses. They've produced a new mobile app that can detect the threat of heat stress in cows using nothing more than a smartphone.

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3:22pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Space

Curiosity Is On Mars, Now What?

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:44 pm

Joe Palca describes the mood of NASA Mars scientists in the wake of the landing overnight, what the latest pictures and data are from the surface of the red planet and what mission scientists are going to do next with Curiosity.

2:53pm

Mon August 6, 2012
The Torch

Boxer Claressa Shields,17, Reaches Olympic Semifinal, Where A Medal Awaits

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:44 pm

U.S. boxer Claressa Shields is declared the winner on points over Anna Laurell of Sweden in the women's middleweight boxing quarterfinals at the 2012 London Olympic Games.
Jack Guez AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Olympic boxer Claressa Shields, the teenager whose dream of being in the first crop of Olympic women boxers led her to tell her story on All Things Considered back in February, will fight for a medal in London.

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2:53pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Summer Nights: Funtown

Cruisin' For Classic Cars On A Steamy Summer Night

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 5:00 am

Antique trucks, including a 1937 Plymouth, on display at the weekly Cruisin' on the Square car show in Milan, Ohio. Classic car owners and enthusiasts gather each Tuesday evening through the summer to show off their cars or even find one to buy.
Noah Adams NPR

At the heart of the small town of Milan, Ohio, there's a graceful and tree-lined town square. It makes a good gathering spot for the classic cars and trucks of decades past.

A 1923 T-Bucket Ford, a '77 Chevy El Camino, a '68 AMC AMX, a '46 Dodge truck, a '59 Ford Galaxie — they all keep arriving after 5 o'clock every Tuesday evening. As the owner-drivers park around the square, engine hoods go up, lawn chairs come out — and the admiration begins.

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2:53pm

Mon August 6, 2012
You Must Read This

An Apocalyptic Romp Through The 'Golden' State

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:44 pm

iStockphoto.com

Gabrielle Zevin's latest book is All These Things I've Done.

Forgive me, Facebook! I do not always want to tell people what I like. This flaw in my character puts me at odds with much of modern life, which is, of course, organized around a relentless cycle of recommendation.

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3:55pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Space

Life On Mars? Try One Of Saturn's Moons Instead

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 4:46 pm

One of the things the Mars rover will look for is organic molecules that could at least indicate whether there was once life on the Red Planet. But if searching for life in outer space is the goal, many scientists now say we might have better luck elsewhere — specifically one of Saturn's moons, Enceladus.

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3:17pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Election 2012

Could 2012 Be The Year Of The Asian Voter?

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 3:33 pm

Mitt Romney and Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell were featured on the front page of a Chinese-language newspaper following a visit to the Northern Virginia's Asian-American community in June. Such engagements with the Asian community helped McDonnell win his current office.
Courtesy of Peter Su

There's a man in Virginia who could quite possibly hold the key to a Mitt Romney victory in November.

His name? Peter Su.

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