All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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3:00pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Remembrances

David Rakoff Saw The World In All Its Dark Beauty

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:04 pm

David Rakoff, the author of Half Empty, Don't Get Too Comfortable and Fraud, was a frequent contributor to This American Life. He died Thursday at the age of 47.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

When writer David Rakoff died Thursday at the age 47, he was barely the age he said he was always "meant" to be. In his 2010 memoir, Half Empty, he wrote, "Everyone has an internal age, a time in life when one is, if not one's best, then at very least one's most authentic self. I always felt that my internal clock was calibrated somewhere between 47 and 53 years old."

Rakoff died in New York City after a long struggle with cancer — an ordeal that he wrote about with sobering honesty and biting wit.

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2:40pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Middle East

Sunni Cleric Rises To Challenge Hezbollah In Lebanon

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 7:45 am

Sheik Ahmad Assir speaks to supporters at a tent encampment set up in protest against Hezbollah in Sidon, Lebanon. He accuses the Islamist militant group of using resistance against Israel as a smokescreen for another aim: advancing Iranian regional hegemony.
Mohamad al-Baba NPR

On a recent day, baffled motorists honked their horns and veered around the blocked entrance to a major street in Sidon. Now Lebanon's third-largest city, Sidon was once a flourishing Phoenician city-state on the Mediterranean.

The street was closed off by Sunni cleric Sheik Ahmad Assir, who erected a small tent encampment in protest against the country's most powerful military and political force, the militant Islamist group Hezbollah.

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2:38pm

Fri August 10, 2012
U.S.

Puedes Believe It? Spanglish Gets In El Dictionary

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:47 pm

Spanglish, a mixture of English and Spanish, has been spoken for more than a century. A sign in Spanglish advertises a yard sale in Los Angeles in 2009.
Aurelio Jose Barrera Landov

The Royal Spanish Academy — the official arbiter of the Spanish language — recently announced that it will add the word "Espanglish" to the 2014 edition of its dictionary. This is a big deal for the traditionally conservative academy, and it's a big deal for supporters who feel that mix of Spanish and English has officially been ignored for more than a century.

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2:26pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Monkey See

Can NBC Get Its Fall Shows Into The Olympic Spotlight?

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:47 pm

Matthew Perry and Brett Gelman of NBC's Go On appear in a promo shot especially for the Olympics.
Justin Lubin NBC

With the Olympics drawing to a close, NBC is looking especially golden. They have had two weeks of great ratings — including record highs. What better time than on the eve of the network's new fall season to rack up two weeks of record audiences? But what might seem a slam dunk for the network is anything but.

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2:11pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Books News & Features

'Age Of Desire': How Wharton Lost Her 'Innocence'

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:47 pm

Edith Wharton moved to Paris in the early 1900s. Not long after, in 1913, after her affair with Morton Fullerton had ended, she divorced her husband of more than 20 years.
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

Jennie Fields was well into her new novel about Edith Wharton — and her love affair with a young journalist — when she heard that a new cache of Wharton letters had been discovered. They were written to Anna Bahlmann, who was first Wharton's governess and later her literary secretary. Bahlmann had never been considered a major influence on Wharton, but Fields had decided to make her a central character in her book, The Age of Desire, even before she heard about the letters.

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12:05pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Planet Money

How A Pasta Factory Got People To Show Up For Work

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 8:06 am

Robert Smith NPR

Zoe Chace and Robert Smith are reporting from European borders this week. This story is about the unofficial border within one country — the border that divides northern and southern Italy. This is the fourth story in a four-part series.

A decade ago, the Barilla pasta factory in Foggia, Italy, had a big problem with people skipping work. The absentee rate was around 10 percent.

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2:59pm

Thu August 9, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Trail, Even Republicans Spin Clinton Years Into Gold

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

What a difference 14 years makes. Here, Bill Clinton departs the White House on July 31, 1998, after telling reporters he wouldn't take questions about the Monica Lewinsky investigation.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

This week, the presidential campaign has been dominated by debate over the welfare law from the 1990s. It's just the latest example of how both sides are trying to use the Clinton years to their advantage — portraying them as a halcyon golden age.

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2:56pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Wish You Were Here: My Favorite Destination

Wish You Were Here: Listening To Loons In Maine

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Hearing the call of the loons is like "a blessing."
Flickr

Writer Roxana Robinson's most recent novel, Cost, is set in Maine.

Mount Desert Island, off the coast of northern Maine, is known for dramatic scenery. Most of the island is Acadia National Park: steep forests, plunging down to a cobalt sea. Cadillac Mountain, the tallest peak, is the first place where light touches the American continent, each morning at dawn. Trails follow the windswept ridges; they wind along the smooth pink granite bluffs, rising from the deep, icy water, along the wild swirl of the great tides.

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1:32pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea.
iStockphoto.com

There's some disturbing news out today about a disease we don't hear about much these days: gonorrhea. Federal health officials announced that the sexually transmitted infection is getting dangerously close to being untreatable.

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12:35pm

Thu August 9, 2012
The Torch

Women's Olympic Soccer Final: U.S. Beats Japan 2-1, To Win Gold

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:08 am

American Carli Lloyd heads in a goal in the first half to put the U.S. up 1-0 against Japan in the Olympic gold medal match.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

In Olympic women's soccer, the U.S. team has beaten Japan, 2-1, in the gold medal match at London's Wembley Stadium, a game that set a new attendance record with more than 80,000 spectators. Carli Lloyd scored both of the American goals, while U.S. stars Alex Morgan and Abby Wambach weren't able to finish their chances. But they were very active, and both players kept the Japanese defenders occupied around the goal.

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10:41am

Thu August 9, 2012
Planet Money

The Marijuana Trade In The Euro's Birthplace

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 8:26 am

Marijuana in Maastricht
Ermindo Armino AP

Zoe Chace and Robert Smith are reporting from European borders this week. This is the second story in a four-part series.

Maastricht, a town in the Netherlands, is known largely for two things.

  1. The treaty that created the euro was signed there.
  2. Marijuana is legal there, and it's sold at "coffee shops" around town.

This is the story of the troubled relationship between those two claims to fame.

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4:12pm

Wed August 8, 2012
It's All Politics

In Brawl Over Romney's Tax Returns, Harry Reid Gets Marquee Billing

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 4:57 pm

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. speaks to the media at the Capitol in March.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's decision not to release more of his past tax returns has fueled countless attacks and counterattacks.

The former Massachusetts governor has released his 2010 tax return and promises that his 2011 return is forthcoming. He says that's enough.

But that's not enough for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. The result is an increasingly ugly fight.

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3:58pm

Wed August 8, 2012
Business

Tax Evaders Beware! Money's Getting Harder To Hide

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 1:51 pm

The U.S. government has been working for years to crack down on Americans dodging taxes overseas. In 2009, under intense pressure, the Swiss bank UBS released the names of its American customers.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has acknowledged that he had money in a Swiss bank account until 2010. Romney says he wasn't trying to hide the money, since he reported the account to the government.

Even so, he closed the account at a time when the federal government was in the middle of a major crackdown on offshore tax havens — a crackdown that has made it harder for Americans to hide their money overseas.

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3:40pm

Wed August 8, 2012
Asia

Murder Trial Of Chinese Politician's Wife Set To Start

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 5:35 pm

Gu Kailai, the wife of disgraced Chinese politician Bo Xilai, will stand trial on charges related to the murder of British businessman Neil Heywood. Here, the couple is shown in 2007 attending Bo's father's funeral.
Reuters/Landov

One of China's biggest criminal trials opens Thursday, and its lurid details make for a sort-of Communist Party film noir. The wife of an ambitious Chinese politician is accused of murdering a British businessman. Her powerful husband allegedly blocks the police investigation, and the police chief, fearing for his life, takes refuge in a U.S. consulate and implicates the wife in the killing.

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3:06pm

Wed August 8, 2012
Religion

The Most Influential Evangelist You've Never Heard Of

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 6:14 pm

Republican activist David Barton speaks before testifying before the Texas State Board of Education in 2009.
Harry Cabluck AP

David Barton says Americans have been misled about their history. And he aims to change that.

"It's what I would call historical reclamation," Barton explains, in his soft but rapid-fire voice. "We're just trying to get history back to where it's accurate. If you're going to use history, get it right."

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3:06pm

Wed August 8, 2012
The Record

Laughing To Keep From Crying: A Comic Novel About Copyright Law

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:21 pm

Courtesy of Random House

2:42pm

Wed August 8, 2012
News

To Prevent A Tragedy, How Much Can A School Do?

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 4:15 pm

A Colorado judge on Thursday will consider whether to lift the gag order in the case of James Holmes, 24, who's accused of killing 12 and wounding dozens more at a movie theater last month.

NPR and other news organizations want access to case files, including a notebook that Holmes reportedly sent to a university psychiatrist before withdrawing from the school that may have described an attack.

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2:34pm

Wed August 8, 2012
Music Reviews

Lianne La Havas: A Cool Antidote For Late Summer's Heat

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 7:24 am

Lianne La Havas' debut album is titled Is Your Love Big Enough?
Courtesy of the artist

It's gotten to that point in the dog days of August where the air is stale and nothing seems to be moving. But sometimes all it takes to snap me out of a late-summer heat coma is the sound of a new and electrifying voice — like that of Lianne La Havas.

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2:32pm

Wed August 8, 2012
The Two-Way

Researcher: Temple Gunman Said Military Experience Drove Him To Hate

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 4:15 pm

Wade Michael Page, in a photo released by police.
Oak Creek Police

Pete Simi says that when he heard it was Wade Michael Page who police said killed six people at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin on Sunday, he felt "sick to my stomach."

Simi, a professor of criminology at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, and co-author of American Swastika, realized that he had talked to Page at length during his research on the white power movement in the United States.

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4:00pm

Tue August 7, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Trail, A Campaign's Style Can Reveal A Lot About Substance

President Obama delivers remarks at a campaign event on July 5 in Parma, Ohio.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

While President Obama and Mitt Romney offer competing visions every day on the campaign trail, there's also a more superficial aspect to their campaigns.

And on the surface, Obama and Romney events feel completely different.

Take a recent summer night in Leesburg, Va. Dorothy Fontaine had been standing outside of a local high school since the sun was high in the sky.

When asked why she would spend that much time waiting, Fontaine replied: "It's the president of the United States! I mean, isn't it cool to go see the president of the United States?"

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