All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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2:18pm

Wed July 11, 2012
American Dreams: Then And Now

Korean Families Chase Their Dreams In The U.S.

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:33 pm

Hyungsoo Kim brought his sons Woosuk (left) and Whoohyun to California from Korea so the boys could get an American public-school education. In "goose families," one parent migrates to an English-speaking country with the children, while the other parent stays in Korea.
Martin Kaste NPR

Eleven-year-old Woosuk Kim sees his mother only three or four times a year. That's because he's part of what Koreans call a "goose family": a family that migrates in search of English-language schooling.

A goose family, Woosuk explains, means "parents — mom and dad — have to be separate for the kids' education."

Woosuk's father brought him and his little brother to America two years ago to attend Hancock Park Elementary, a public school in Los Angeles. The boys' mother stayed in South Korea to keep working.

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1:55pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Firefighters Prevail In Fight for Health Insurance

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:33 pm

It all started around a kitchen table in Custer, South Dakota. John Lauer, a 27-year-old seasonal firefighter for an elite U.S.

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1:55pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Music Reviews

Sory Kandia Kouyaté: Guinea's Voice Of Revolution

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:33 pm

Released last month, La Voix de la Révolution is a new compilation of songs by Sory Kandia Kouyaté, who died in 1977.
Courtesy of the artist

Sory Kandia Kouyaté was one of the most celebrated singers in West Africa when he died suddenly in 1977. He was just 44, and given his spectacular voice, it's a safe bet that Kouyaté would have been an international star had he lived just a few years longer. Now, some of his finest recordings have been collected on a two-disc retrospective called La Voix de la Révolution.

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12:23pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Europe

In France, The (Abandoned) Dog Days Of Summer

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:33 pm

Dogs wait to be adopted at the Animals Without Home shelter south of Paris in Montgeron, France, in August 2010. France is among the European countries with the highest number of abandoned pets during the summer months, when people take long vacations.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

For Europeans, it's not uncommon to take a whole month of vacation in the summer. But the season can be a deadly time for the many pets left behind — permanently.

The abandonment of domestic animals by vacationers is a scourge in many countries across Europe. And in France, this summer isn't likely to be different despite campaigns by animal-rights groups against the practice.

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3:25pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Homeless Rural Vets Find A Place To Call Home

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

American Legion Post Cmdr. Mark Czmyr and his father, Navy veteran William Czmyr, originated the idea to create permanent apartments for homeless vets in Jewett City, Conn.
Lucy Nalpathanchil for NPR

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own, thanks to the American Legion.

The organization's post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional but permanent supportive housing in their rural community.

For 55-year-old Army veteran Jeff MacDonald, the new facility in Jewett City, Conn., was like "winning the lottery."

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3:10pm

Tue July 10, 2012
NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse

NewsPoet: Paisley Rekdal Writes The Day In Verse

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 12:10 pm

Paisley Rekdal visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Tuesday.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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2:35pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Europe

'Vultures' Swoop In For Deals In Debt-Ridden Spain

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

A "For Sale" sign hangs outside mostly empty apartment blocks in the Madrid satellite town of Sesena in February. Banks are trying to sell billions of euros worth of property left by bankrupt developers. This is attracting bargain-hunting investors from abroad.
Andrea Comas Reuters/Landov

Back in the day, Madrid's Palace Hotel was Ernest Hemingway's old haunt, or at least the bar was. Now, rooms at the posh hotel just down from the famed Prado Museum go for up to $6,000 a night. And gathering in its lobby these days? An altogether different type of foreigner: the kind in expensive suits.

"Probably they are institutional investors, hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds," says Federico Steinberg, an economist at Madrid's Elcano Institute.

There's a lot of cash around the world, he says, and a lot of people looking for bargains.

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1:57pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Middle East

Syrian Rebels Carve Buffer Zone Near Turkish Border

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

More than 35,000 Syrians have sought shelter in Turkey. Most of the refugees at the Kilis refugee camp in southern Turkey are women and children.
Adem Altan AFP/Getty Images

At this isolated part of the Turkish border, there's just one Turkish guard, a fence and, beyond an olive grove, Syria.

The Syrian side is just a short walk, perhaps 10 minutes. The area looks completely calm and there is no sign of the Syrian military.

Abu Amar, a rebel who has fought in Syria for five weeks, walked across this field from the Syrian village of Atma, which is now serving as a rebel headquarters. He says much of the northwestern province of Idlib is now controlled by the rebels, and it has become easy to move back and forth between Syria and Turkey here.

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1:42pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Poverty In America

Cycle Of Poverty Hard To Break In Poorest U.S. City

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 9:31 pm

Devora Trapp, 24, picks up her 8-month-old son, Dardarius Taylor, late one evening at the Opportunity House's Second Street Learning Center, a 24-hour day care center for low-income families in Reading, Pa.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

In the middle of the night, most children are home in bed. But at the Second Street Learning Center in Reading, Pa., a half-dozen tiny bodies are curled up on green plastic floor mats, fast asleep.

Conversations are hushed. The lights are dim. At 1:30 a.m., day care worker Virginia Allen gently shakes two little sisters, snuggled under the same blanket, to tell them that their mother is there to pick them up.

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1:39pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Law

Justice Delayed: After Three Decades, An Apology

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

Kirk Odom and his wife, Harriet, outside the H. Carl Moultrie Courthouse in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the Justice Department said there was "clear and convincing evidence" that Odom is innocent of a 1981 rape and robbery, for which he spent more than two decades behind bars.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Nearly 31 years after he was convicted of rape and armed robbery, Kirk Odom on Tuesday all but won his fight to be declared an innocent man.

The Justice Department filed court papers saying, "There is clear and convincing evidence that Mr. Odom is innocent of the charges for which he was convicted," and apologized for the "terrible injustice."

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1:12pm

Tue July 10, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

A Twitter Conversation: #NPRCities Roundtable

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

Peter Booth and Alexandra Booth iStockphoto

What do you think makes a better city? Do you like a mix of old and new on the same block?

Several urban thinkers joined us for a discussion on Twitter, including Bruce Katz of the Brookings Institution, Carol Coletta of ArtPlace America, writer and blogger Aaron Renn, The Atlantic Cities editor Sommer Mathis and Diana Lind of Next American City.

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1:01pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

When Does An App Need FDA's Blessing?

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:34 pm

Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Bernard Farrell obsesses over every bite he eats, every minute of exercise he gets, and everything that stresses him out. And, more than anything else, Farrell obsesses over his blood sugar.

He has to. Farrell, 55, has Type 1 diabetes.

"Pretty much everything affects our blood sugar," says Farrell, of Littleton, Mass.

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3:38pm

Mon July 9, 2012
All Tech Considered

The Next Silicon Valley? Berlin Startups Catching Up With The Hype

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 2:29 pm

Simon Fabich (center) is CEO and co-founder of the Berlin-based online shopping startup Monoqi. Artsy and relatively inexpensive, Berlin is an up-and-coming city for European tech startups.
Courtesy of Monoqi

California's Silicon Valley remains by far the dominant arena for high-tech startups and venture capitalists looking to back innovative projects.

But Europe is starting to make its mark on the startup scene. London, Paris and Berlin are starting to hold their own as more and more European startups look to compete on the global stage and attract investors.

A 'Crazy Green Field' For Creative Types

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3:09pm

Mon July 9, 2012
The Record

Essence In New Orleans: A Festival That Knows Its Audience

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:23 pm

Mary J. Blige performs during the 2012 Essence Music Festival at Louisiana Superdome on July 7.
Erika Goldring Getty Images

For the last 18 years, the Essence Music Festival has been the go-to event for African-Americans, especially African-American women. For three days in New Orleans, hundreds of thousands show up for R&B and gospel concerts and panels on politics, financial planning and parenting.

If it's a party, as creator George Wein describes it, it's a party with a purpose.

"New Orleans is a party city and they party," Wein says. "People party here. If you go to the hotels — 40-floor hotels — [there's] like 40 floors of parties."

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2:50pm

Mon July 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Swing State TV Stations Spiking Ad Rates As Campaign Cash Pours In

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 4:19 pm

President Obama at a stop on his bus tour of Ohio in Port Clinton on July 5.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

2:11pm

Mon July 9, 2012
The Salt

Brits Battle For Cheesy Glory By Writing National Anthem For Cheddar

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:54 am

The British Cheese Board is looking for a national anthem for cheddar cheese.
iStockphoto.com

2:11pm

Mon July 9, 2012
NPR Story

Texas Rejects Medicaid Expansion In Health Law

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 3:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Texas is saying no to key parts of the federal health care law. Today, Governor Rick Perry said Texas will not create a state exchange for people to buy health insurance and will not expand Medicaid. In a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Governor Perry called both provisions a power grab, brazen intrusions into the sovereignty of our state.

Here's Governor Perry today on Fox News.

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2:11pm

Mon July 9, 2012
Around the Nation

Scranton City Workers Hit With Pay Cut

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 4:25 pm

In Scranton, Pa., city workers are fuming about their sudden pay decrease. The city's mayor says there isn't enough money to pay employees their regular wages. So, the most recent paychecks reflected minimum wage — no matter what workers' previous salaries had been.

2:11pm

Mon July 9, 2012
Africa

Turmoil In African Nation Of Mali Continues

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 3:38 pm

Melissa Block speaks with Jennifer Cooke, director of the Africa program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, about the deteriorating situation in Mali. Islamic militants in recent days have destroyed sacred tombs in the ancient city of Timbuktu. A military coup there in March created a power vacuum, allowing the rebel and Islamist groups to take over the northern part of the country. West African leaders this past weekend urged Mali's interim government to request outside military assistance.

12:37pm

Mon July 9, 2012
AIDS: A Turning Point

Teen Years Pose New Risks For Kids Born With HIV

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 9:33 pm

A boy waits to get his anti-AIDS drugs from pharmacist Rajesh Chandra at the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence in Gaborone.
Jason Beaubien NPR

The southern African nation of Botswana is grappling with a relatively new problem in the evolving AIDS pandemic: It now has a large group of HIV-positive adolescents.

The teenagers were infected at birth before Botswana managed to almost wipe out mother-to-child transmission of the virus. These children have survived because of a public health system that provides nearly universal access to powerful anti-AIDS drugs.

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