All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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1:00pm

Wed February 29, 2012
Politics

Snowe Retirement Launches Political Feeding Frenzy

There was a political scramble in Maine after Tuesday's surprise retirement announcement from Olympia Snowe, one of the state's two Republican senators.

1:00pm

Wed February 29, 2012
From Our Listeners

Letters: On Women's Boxing

Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish read emails from listeners about a segment on a female boxer in Flint, Michigan.

1:00pm

Wed February 29, 2012
Economy

Bernanke: Economic Growth Will Be Slow

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledged that the economy is improving on Wednesday, but he isn't convinced the recovery is self-sustaining. He reaffirmed the Fed's position that the economy will likely need super-low interest rates well into 2014.

1:00pm

Wed February 29, 2012
Medical Treatments

FDA Issues New Warnings On Statin Drugs

Federal health officials have added new safety alerts to statins, a class of drugs used to lower cholesterol levels. The Food and Drug Administration cited rare side effects, including memory loss, diabetes and muscle pain. Robert Siegel talks to Rob Stein about the news.

1:00pm

Wed February 29, 2012
The Impact of War

Iraq Veterans Looking For Practical Assistance

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 6:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

At the White House tonight, President Obama hosts a thank you dinner for a few dozen Iraq War veterans. They represent more than 1 million uniformed men and women who served during the nine-year conflict. The dinner is meant to be a show of gratitude.

NPR's Scott Horsley reports that some who served are also looking for more practical assistance as they cope with the war's lingering effects.

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2:04pm

Tue February 28, 2012
CD Reviews

Heartless Bastards: Rousing Songs, Born On The Road

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 1:00 pm

Heartless Bastards' fourth album, Arrow, was released earlier this month.
Nathan Presley

It's true that you can still get by in rock 'n' roll on the strength of a unique voice. But it helps if said voice has something interesting to work with.

On the first three records by Heartless Bastards, that wasn't always the case. The Mountain, from 2008, had some terrific songs about a breakup, and a few that got bogged down in a rut. But on the band's latest release, Arrow, every song has a powerful, almost magnetic melody.

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1:30pm

Tue February 28, 2012
The Record

Carnaval In Uruguay: Choir Competitions In The Streets

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 1:00 pm

The murga choir Los Curtidores de Hongos performes at the Teatro de Lavalleja in Minas, Uruguay, in February.
Martina Castro for NPR

Uruguay boasts that it has the longest Carnival celebration not just in Latin America, but the world. The 40-day celebration is dotted with makeshift stages all around the capital city of Montevideo for performances of choral music called murga. Murga is both entertainment and a sociopolitical commentary that survived the military dictatorship of the 1970s.

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1:38pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Planet Money

From Cell Phones To Cigarettes: The Long Arm Of The Chinese Government

How many government-owned businesses do you see in this picture?
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

The streets of Beijing and Shanghai feel like an entrepreneurial free-for-all, full of mom-and-pop stores and street vendors selling snacks and cheap toys.

But when you pull back the curtain, you see a different picture: a country where the government still controls huge swaths of the economy.

When you're in China, there's a good chance you're doing business with the government every time you:

  • make a call on your cellphone (the government owns the country's biggest cellphone network)
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1:15pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Architecture

Chinese Architect Wang Shu Wins The Pritzker Prize

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:00 am

Wang Shu's design for the Ningbo History Museum came to him at 3 in the morning. He realized his job was to show people what their city used to look like, and the design recalls an ancient Chinese fortress.
Lv Hengzhong

For the first time, the Pritzker Architecture Prize has been awarded to an architect based in China. Wang Shu, 49, is interested in preservation, working slowly and tradition — ideals that sometimes seem forgotten in today's booming China. Wang says in the 1990s he had to get away from China's architectural "system" of demolition, megastructures and get-rich-quick — so he spent the decade working with common craftspeople building simple constructions.

"I go out of system," Wang says, "Because, finally I think, this system is too strong."

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1:03pm

Sun February 26, 2012
Author Interviews

How Sugar Brought An End to Hawaii's Nationhood

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 5:40 am

iStockphoto.com

If you've seen a Hawaiian tourism commercial, a beach movie, or even a cartoon with Daffy Duck in a lei and a grass skirt, you've heard the poignant strains of "Aloha Oe."

But the tune has a history stretching far beyond cartoons and commercials: It was composed in 1878 by the woman who would become the last queen of Hawaii, Lili'uokalani.

Hawaii is the only state to have once been an independent monarchy. And when Lili'u, as she called herself, was born in 1838, it was at its height.

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3:40pm

Sat February 25, 2012
Author Interviews

A Theologian Has A Falling Out With God In 'Still'

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 9:46 am

HarperOne

Theologian Lauren Winner was 21 when she became a Christian.

Although she was raised in a Jewish household and had converted to Orthodox Judaism, she says she felt drawn to Christianity. Her surprising conversion is the subject of her first memoir, the bestseller Girl Meets God.

In Winner's new book, Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis, she writes about a spiritual crisis.

Winner, an ordained Episcopal priest who teaches Christian spirituality at Duke University, says it happened around the time her mother died and her marriage collapsed.

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3:37pm

Sat February 25, 2012
Music Interviews

Finding Hope, With The Cranberries' Help

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 4:20 pm

The Cranberries (left to right): Noel Hogan, Fergal Lawler, Dolores O'Riordan, Mike Hogan.
Jess Baumung Courtesy of the artist

This week, weekends on All Things Considered begins a new series called "Why Music Matters": stories from fans, in their own words, about how music has changed their lives. In this first installment, Seattle resident Nathan Hotchkiss reflects on a sheltered childhood.

"My parents were very religious," he says. "I was limited to listening only to Christian music and classical. My father would stay away a lot, and my mother would be wrapped up in her own turmoil, and it would spill over onto me."

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1:00pm

Sat February 25, 2012
Analysis

Week In News: Obama, Gas Prices And The GOP Race

President Obama and his GOP rivals are sparing over gas prices. In an election year, that pocketbook issue could hurt the president, but Republican voters still have no clear cut nominee to face off in November anyway. Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney square off in Michigan on Tuesday, with poll numbers flipping between the two. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz speaks with Chicago Tribune columnist Clarence Page about these and other news stories from the week.

5:46pm

Fri February 24, 2012
Music Interviews

Robert Glasper: A Unified Field Theory For Black Music

Originally published on Sat February 25, 2012 4:31 pm

Robert Glasper leads his band through experiments in jazz, hip-hop, R&B and rock on his new album, Black Radio.
Mike Schreiber

When some of the biggest names in R&B and hip-hop are clamoring to be on a jazz record, you know you're dealing with a special kind of jazz musician.

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3:57pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Message Machine

2012 Political TV: Ads, Lies And Videotape

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 4:37 pm

An image from a superPAC ad attacking Newt Gingrich, whose campaign called on TV stations to pull the ad off the air.
Restore Our Future

3:19pm

Fri February 24, 2012
All Tech Considered

Google's Goggles: Is The Future Right Before Our Eyes?

What would the world look like seen through Google's eyes?
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Like flying cars and time travel, eye glasses with computing power have long been sci-fi fantasy, relegated to Terminator movies and the like. Now it appears that Google may be a few months from selling a version of their own.

Google glasses — which may be released as a "beta" product — could put smartphone capabilities such as GPS maps, weather, time, Web streaming and more inches from your eyeball.

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3:13pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

One Of Last Movie Theater Organs Pipes On

Seattle has one of the country's few working movie theater organs. Jim Riggs plays the theater's Wurlitzer organ while silent movies are screened. Recently he performed during a screening of 1927's Wings, the only silent film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

2:25pm

Fri February 24, 2012
Middle East

Syrian Official Says Media Coverage Is Manipulated

Melissa Block talks to Zouheir Jabbour, Chief of Mission of the Syrian Embassy in Washington, DC, about the call for a ceasefire in Homs and the allegations of atrocities by the Syrian regime.

1:00pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

Court: Unscrambling Hard Drive Is Unconstitutional

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 4:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

For the first time, a federal appeals court has ruled that prosecutors cannot force a suspect to unscramble his encrypted computer hard drives. The Atlanta-based appeals court says that would violate the man's Fifth Amendment right against self incrimination.

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1:00pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

Braun Return The Biggest Story In Baseball Training

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 4:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Another legal question: What do a urine test and FedEx have in common? Well, today at least, they both relate to one of Major League Baseball's best players, Ryan Braun of the Milwaukee Brewers, the National League MVP. Yesterday, an arbitrator overturned his 50-game suspension for violating the league's rules on performance-enhancing drugs. And today, Braun showed up for spring training in Phoenix and defended himself to the media.

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