All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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1:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Europe

Middle Class Greeks Losing Hope Amid Austerity

Originally published on Fri February 17, 2012 4:45 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Greece is anxiously awaiting a bailout from its European partners. One reason for the holdup - the Europeans say the Greeks aren't trying hard enough to reform. The Greeks say they've already implemented austerity measures so severe that they are destroying the country's middle class.

Joanna Kakissis has the story of one family in Athens.

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2:18pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Election 2012

In Arizona, Romney Can't Take Mormons For Granted

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 4:41 pm

Karen Johnson, from Linden, Ariz., supports the candidacy of Ron Paul. She says Mitt Romney shares her faith, but not her politics.
Peter O'Dowd For NPR

The wind howls on a blustery Sunday morning in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona, as well-dressed families pull into the parking lot of a Mormon church.

Mormon pioneer roots run more than a century deep in this part of the state, an isolated spot between two Indian reservations.

Karen Johnson is among the Mormon faithful, passionate about God and country.

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2:13pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Election 2012

In One Maine County, Every Caucus Vote May Count

Washington County, Maine, is not a place for unhardy souls.

It's the easternmost county in all of New England, and one of the poorest. And at this time of year, people in Down East Maine do anything they can to eke out a living.

"I get about six months out of it," county resident Hartley Goston said, referring to his lobster boat, The Darian Sue. "I get a few odd jobs here and there to help tie up some loose ends."

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10:00am

Thu February 16, 2012
Planet Money

Is China An Economic Miracle, Or A Bubble Waiting To Pop?

Originally published on Fri February 17, 2012 10:18 am

This can't go on forever.
Jacob Goldstein NPR

China's economy sailed through the financial crisis unscathed — at least in the short run.

When the global crisis hit, the country's government-owned banks started lending out lots more money. The money came largely from the savings accounts of ordinary Chinese people. It went largely to finance big construction projects, which helped keep China's economy growing.

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3:33pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Undefeated' Filmmakers Talk Friday Nights' Fights

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 1:15 pm

North Memphis' Manassas Tigers Coach Bill Courtney and player O.C. Brown stand on the sidelines in a scene from the Oscar-nominated documentary Undefeated.
Weinstein Co.

By 2009, after years of losses, the all-black football team at Manassas High School in inner-city North Memphis, Tenn., was known as 'Whipping Boy Manassas' — one of the worst teams in the entire state. The new documentary Undefeated, recently nominated for an Oscar, captures the team's following season, and the struggles of its coach and players, on and off the field.

Co-directors Dan Lindsay and T.J. Martin describe the team's recent history.

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1:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
NPR Story

Letters: On Aleksey Igudesman And Hyung-ki Joo

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel read emails from listeners about violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo.

3:24pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Food

Corn Prices Making Life Difficult For N.D. Bees

The northern plains, especially the Dakotas, are home to about half of the country's honey bee hives during the summer. It's been a good place for bees because they can gather nectar and pollen from so many wildflowers. But the landscape of the area is becoming less bee-friendly, and the consequences could be felt as far away as the almond groves of California, which depend on those same bees for pollination.

3:08pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Asia

A Primer On China's Military

Melissa Block speaks with Eric Heginbotham — senior political scientist at RAND — about China's military capability today, how it's developed over time and what the Chinese make of ramped-up attention from the US.

2:09pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Music Reviews

Dr. Dog: A Standout Among Stereotypes

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 4:16 pm

Dr. Dog's sixth studio album is titled Be the Void.
Chris Crisman

Sometimes I wonder: Do the members of young indie-rock bands know that they're walking stereotypes? There's the scruffy dude who's obsessed with everything vintage and analog, the Pavement-worshiping, whiny-voiced lead singer, the rhythm section that knows its way around every oddity recorded by The Kinks. That's pretty much how I pegged the Philadelphia sextet Dr.

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1:02pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Winter Songs

A Skating Rink's 'Ribbon In The Sky'

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 4:16 pm

hey.kiddo via Flickr

4:16pm

Mon February 13, 2012
It's All Politics

What Would The GOP Candidates Do With The Federal Budget? A Look At Their Plans

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 5:06 pm

A sign on a car window at a Feb. 2 rally for Ron Paul in Elko, Nev.
Ted S. Warren AP

It goes without saying that the men who are vying for the Republican presidential nomination found serious flaws with the budget plan President Obama released Monday. But it got us thinking that this might also be a good time to dig into the budget plans offered by the GOP candidates.

All of the candidates want to cut government spending and balance the federal budget. They also want to cut taxes.

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4:10pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Music

The Ballad Of The Tearful: Why Some Songs Make You Cry

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 3:45 pm

Adele won the song of the year category at this year's Grammy Awards for her tear-jerker "Someone Like You."
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Note: A number of listeners responded to this story and said the definition of appoggiatura was incorrect. Music commentator Rob Kapilow has a second opinion here.

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2:44pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Music Videos

Igudesman And Joo: 'I Will Survive'

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:29 am

Doriane Raiman NPR

Violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo believe that classical music should be fun. That's why they subvert it whenever they appear on stage.

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11:32am

Mon February 13, 2012
Three Books...

3 Biting Books For Those Bitter On Valentine's Day

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 8:54 am

Nate iStockphoto.com

For those who find themselves alone this Valentine's Day, or who reject the holiday altogether, you might not want to read about star-crossed lovers pining for each other and — even worse — winding up together in the end. So here are three alternatives to comfort you this Feb 14. Each novel is just the right length to read in a single night with a box of drugstore-bought chocolates. And although these tales are indeed reflections on love, the characters they follow are skeptics.

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1:59pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Author Interviews

When The Bankers Plotted To Overthrow FDR

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 6:08 am

The Plots Against the President

It was a dangerous time in America: The economy was staggering, unemployment was rampant and a banking crisis threatened the entire monetary system.

The newly elected president pursued an ambitious legislative program aimed at easing some of the troubles. But he faced vitriolic opposition from both sides of the political spectrum.

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1:51pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Science

Virtual Penguins A Prescription For Pain?

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 1:44 pm

Snow World was designed specifically with burn patients in mind-- its icy river and comical snowmen are the furthest thing imaginable from fire.
Ari Hollander Hunter Hoffman

For troops injured in Iraq and Afghanistan, the deepest physical pain often comes much later — weeks, or even months, after the incident. That was the case for Sam Brown, whose story appears in this month's GQ magazine.

Brown graduated from West Point in 2006. In the late summer of 2008, he was deployed to southern Afghanistan to lead a platoon. He did security for base construction and made sure the local villagers had enough food, water, and medicine.

It was hot, often mind-numbingly dull, and dusty.

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1:00pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Latin America

American's Arrest In Cuba Could Have Impact

A U.S. contractor working to provide Internet service to Cuba's small Jewish community was charged with spying and sentenced to 15 years in a Cuban prison. Alan Gross was reportedly working for the U.S. Agency for International Development.

1:00pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Interviews

Focus Of The Family's President On Group's Work

Jim Daly took over as president of Focus on the Family, one of the most prominent Christian evangelical organizations in the U.S., in 2005. Daly discusses his work, the organization's views on divisive issues such as abortion, same-sex marriage and immigration reform.

10:51am

Sun February 12, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

From Hyperpianos To Harmonious Handel: New Classical Albums

Lisa Smirnova studied Handel's suites for five years before recording them.
ECM

What's the saying — the more things change, the more they stay the same? It seems that's how it goes in the ways we make music. MIT futurologist Tod Machover rethinks traditional instruments, coming up with new things like the hyperpiano; Pianist Michael Chertock gives it a go in an explosive excerpt below.

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7:15pm

Sat February 11, 2012
The Record

Whitney Houston: Her Life Played Out Like An Opera

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:32 pm

Whitney Houston performs in 1988.
David Corio Getty Images

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