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All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday at 6:00 p.m.

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

All Things Considered Weekend also airs at 4:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday on KANW-2.

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Justin Timberlake has had an eventful week: He turned 37 on Wednesday, dropped a new album Friday and danced his shoes off Sunday as part of football's biggest night.

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The Winter Olympics in South Korea will be a chance for the country to show off its newest robot creations. NPR's Elise Hu reports that the peek into the future starts as soon as you land at the airport.

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Our next guest has been chasing what he calls zombie campaigns. He's a reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. Chris O'Donnell, thank you for joining us.

CHRIS O'DONNELL: Glad to be here, Ailsa.

CHANG: What are zombie campaigns?

It's last call for public comment on a Trump administration proposal that would give bar and restaurant owners more control over workers' tips.

The Labor Department has been asking for feedback, and already hundreds of thousands of people have weighed in.

Many say they say they're opposed to a rule that would allow restaurant owners to pocket tips for themselves.

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Dan Reynolds is known to millions of fans around the world as the lead singer of the popular band, Imagine Dragons, because of hits like "Radioactive," "Thunder," and last year's chart topper, "Believer."

The spiritual questions at the core of "Believer" are unmistakable, but also deeply personal. Now, though, Reynolds has taken those questions to new, more public terrain — the treatment of LGBTQ members of the church of Reynold's upbringing, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon Church.

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Vice President Mike Pence was in western Pennsylvania today campaigning for the Republican running in a special election there.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Stop me if you've heard this one before.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GROUNDHOG DAY")

BILL MURRAY: (As Phil) It's February 2, Groundhog Day.

When Orlando (Francisco Reyes) enters a rooftop supper-club in Santiago at the beginning of the film, he can't take his eyes off Marina (Daniela Vega), a striking young vocalist who's crooning lyrics about throwing her boyfriend out with the garbage because, she sings, his love "is like yesterday's newspaper."

She sings that line straight to Orlando, with a little smile. She's definitely not throwing him away ... she's moving into his apartment as soon as they celebrate her 27th birthday.

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In 2003, in Burkina Faso, Abdel Akim Adjibade found out he won the lottery — the green card lottery. He became one of approximately 50,000 people each year to win entry to the U.S. this way, and now he teaches physics in Illinois. He shares what this experience was like for him.

As part of his immigration proposal, President Trump has proposed eliminating the Green Card Lottery that allows around 55,000 people who have no family connection or employer sponsor to enter the U.S. each year. Muzaffar Chishti, a director of the Migration Policy Institute, explains the origin of the program and how it's changed.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Let's stay with this story and bring in the voice of Frank Aum. He's a North Korea expert, formerly at the Defense Department, now at the United States Institute of Peace. And he's here in our studios. Welcome.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

To get a sense of how the president's State of the Union address was received in different parts of the country, we've called on two governors. Elsewhere in the show, we'll hear from Colorado Governor Democrat John Hickenlooper.

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