Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Hosted by: Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Michael Brasher

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition.  Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.  Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.  Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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2:00am

Tue October 25, 2011
NPR Story

In Britain, A New Push To Leave EU

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 7:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

The European Union created a huge single market and stability for a continent that was ravaged by terrible wars during the 20th century. Now, in the 21st century, the European debt crisis has some eurozone members pushing to get out of the club. This all came to a head in Britain yesterday, where Parliament voted on whether to hold a public referendum on leaving the union.

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1:31pm

Mon October 24, 2011
Author Interviews

New Bio Quotes Jobs On God, Gates And Great Design

Ever since Steve Jobs died on Oct. 5, much has been written but little revealed about a man who was the face of an iconic American company. But now comes the official biography, published less than three weeks after the death of the Apple co-founder. Over the course of two years and 40 interviews, biographer Walter Isaacson had unique access to Jobs, right up until Jobs' death at age 56.

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6:13am

Mon October 24, 2011

5:58am

Mon October 24, 2011
Business

School Turns Trash Into Cash

A school in Flint, Mich., gathered tens of thousands of potato chip bags, juice boxes and other lunchtime trash, then sold it all to Terracycle, a company that turns the packaging into bags and placemats. The school made almost $500 dollars.

3:22am

Mon October 24, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Big-Name Drugs Are Falling Off The 'Patent Cliff'

iStockphoto.com

Some of the most popular and expensive brand-name drugs are about to go generic.

Take Lipitor, for example. In November, the heart drug comes off-patent — and by next June, there are likely to be multiple generic versions.

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5:45am

Fri October 21, 2011
History

Soccer Played As Early As The 15th Century

Historians have found documents from 1497 that show King James IV paid two shillings for a bag of "fut ballis." Seventy years later, Mary Queen of Scots watched a match. The curator of the Scottish Football Museum says the early game was for the royals but the matches did include heated arguments between players.

5:31am

Fri October 21, 2011
Research News

Biologists Solve Surfing Snails Mystery

Violet snails may be some of the best surfers around, but how the ocean snails develop their little rafts has been a mystery. Biologists have now figured out that the surfing snails ascended from evolutionary relatives on the ocean floor. The surfboard evolved from the snails' egg packet.

2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

The MTV reality show The Real World posted an ad on Craigslist earlier this week seeking Occupy Wall Street protesters as cast members. The news blog "Talking Points Memo" picked up on the posting, and called the production company to confirm. An executive there said the protest is "something that's in the zeitgeist of young people."

2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

Arab World Reacts To Gadhafi's Death

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 5:32 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

Libyans awoke, this morning, to a new dawn, a nation no longer in the grip of a dictator. Moammar Gadhafi was killed yesterday, after being captured in his hometown of Sirte, where fierce fighting had raged for weeks between his loyalists and anti-Gadhafi forces.

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2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

Gadhafi May Be Dead But His Presence Lives On

For the latest from Libya, Ari Shapiro talks to Vivienne Walt, a correspondent for "Time Magazine," who's based in Tripoli.

2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Animals

Zanesville Animal Tragedy Echoes 'Ridge' Plot

The events in Ohio involving the release of dozens of exotic animals eerily parallel parts of Michael Koryta's latest book: The Ridge. Koryta talks to Ari Shapiro about the challenges of regulating exotic animal ownership.

2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Movies

Margin Call Review

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: The global financial crisis of 2008 has a lot of dramatic potential. It propelled the Oscar-winning documentary "Inside Job" and HBO's movie "Too Big To Fail." Now comes "Margin Call," in theaters this weekend. Kenneth Turan has a review.

KENNETH TURAN: "Margin Call" brings us into the inner sanctum of a top Wall Street investment banking firm in peril. The film opens on what everyone in the firm thinks – erroneously, as it turns out - will be the worst part of their day. A team from human resources arrives intent on terminating folks.

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2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Europe

Eurozone Debt Crisis Divides France, Germany

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, host: And I'm Ari Shapiro filling in for Steve Inskeep.

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2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi's Death Caps Libya's Civil War

Ousted Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was killed on Thursday after being captured in his hometown of Sirte. His death marks a spectacular fall from power that began in February when anti-government forces seized the coastal city of Misrata.

2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Europe

Europe Reacts To Gadhafi's Death

Oliver Miles, a former British Ambassador to Libya, talks to Renee Montagne about the reaction in Britain, and France to the death of former Libyan ruler Moammar Gadhafi. What does his death mean for Europe's future role in Libya?

2:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Business

Walmart To Cut Back On Employee Healthcare

The nation's largest private employer will no longer provide a healthcare plan for new part-time employees, according to The New York Times. Walmart is also raising premiums for many full-time staff. The reason is rising costs, according to a company spokesman quoted in the story.

10:01pm

Thu October 20, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Franz Liszt At 200: An Important, But Not Great, Composer

Hungarian composer and pianist Franz Liszt wrote incredibly difficult music, music that only he was capable of playing.

Hulton Archive

Tomorrow is the 200th birthday of composer and pianist Franz Liszt. Morning Edition's music commentator Miles Hoffman thinks there are plenty of reasons to celebrate.

"This is a man who lived an extraordinarily long and an extraordinarily productive life — a very complicated life," Hoffman says "By many accounts he was the greatest pianist of the 19th century, somebody who revolutionized people's ideas of what was possible on the piano."

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10:01pm

Thu October 20, 2011
StoryCorps

Life As A 'Symbol Of Integration' In College

A.P. Tureaud Jr. (right) talked with Steven Walkley at StoryCorps in New York.

StoryCorps

In 1953, A.P. Tureaud Jr. enrolled as a freshman at Louisiana State University, becoming the school's first and only black undergraduate that year. His family had filed a lawsuit on his behalf, after his first application to the school was rejected because of his race. And, as Tureaud remembers, life on the campus in Baton Rouge was a challenge.

Tureaud, 75, talked about the experience with his friend, Steven Walkley, 62.

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5:14am

Thu October 20, 2011
Around the Nation

Giant Cell Phone Bill Shocks Florida Woman

Celina Aarons' deaf brother communicates via text message. She usually pays about $175 a month for his cellphone. But when he went to Canada without an international plan, the bill was more than $200,000. A Miami TV station intervened, and now T-Mobile says Aarons only owes $2,500. She has six months to pay.

5:05am

Thu October 20, 2011
Animals

Forget The Tux, Little Blue Penguins Need Sweaters

The Little Blue Penguins off the coast of New Zealand are in trouble, and they need sweaters to save them. The birds are being rescued from a big oil spill. The sweaters keep the penguins from preening. That way they don't ingest the oil.

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