Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Hosted by: Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Michael Brasher

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition.  Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.  Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.  Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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2:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Analysis

Politics In The News

NPR's Cokie Roberts talks to David Greene about the latest political news.

2:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Research News

3 Scientists Win Nobel For Immune System Studies

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 5:19 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: Three scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their work on understanding the immune system. However, it turns out one of the scientists died several days ago, which could mean that he was not eligible for the prize. Joining us now is NPR science correspondent Jon Hamilton.

Thanks for joining us, Jon.

JON HAMILTON: Good to be here.

NEARY: Let's start with this scientist who died. Who was he, and why might his death make him ineligible for the Nobel Prize?

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2:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Europe

U.S. Family Signs Up For Extreme Schooling In Russia

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: Now, the story of some students who arrived as foreigners in Russia. When New York Times reporter Clifford Levy and his wife Julie Dressner moved to Russia five years ago they chose to use the time to fully immerse their children in the country, opting for a Russian education over the local international school.

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2:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Around the Nation

Ala. Schools Must Check Students Immigration Status

Alabama schools are struggling to deal with the fallout after a tough immigration law went into effect last week. While the law is not supposed to lead to children being denied an education or their parents' deportation, immigrants are fearful.

10:01pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Books

In 'Boomerang,' Cheap Credit Exposes Nations' Flaws

For his book exploring the global financial crisis, Michael Lewis visited countries to see where the money went.
Tabitha Soren

No two countries are experiencing the global financial crisis in the same way. And according to author Michael Lewis, you can tell a lot about each country by looking at its problems — and how they're being dealt with.

To research his new book, Boomerang, Lewis went on what he has called a "financial disaster tour." He surveyed some of the most financially challenged countries in the world from Iceland and Ireland to Greece and the United States.

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5:55am

Fri September 30, 2011
NPR Story

Details Emerge After Reports Of Awlaki's Death

Yemeni officials are saying Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen, was killed while traveling between two provinces in Yemen. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston about reports of the death of Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen.

5:22am

Fri September 30, 2011
Strange News

'Onion' Takes Heat From D.C. Police For Hostage Story

The satirical newspaper The Onion is in trouble with the U.S. Capitol Police. The Onion reported gunshots at the capitol Thursday, saying Congressional leaders took schoolchildren hostage and demanding $12 trillion in cash. Police felt obliged to issue a denial. A spokesman says, "There is no credibility" to the stories in the fake newspaper.

5:15am

Fri September 30, 2011
Strange News

Casino Offers Plastic Surgery Sweepstakes

Atlantic City's Trump Taj Mahal is offering a new kind of shopping spree. One lucky winner will get $25,000 to spend on plastic surgery. Reaching for humor, the Taj announced that its "Nip, Tuck and Lift" sweepstakes will "change the face" of casino promotions. The winner can get lyposuction, a facelift — or take the cash instead.

4:04am

Fri September 30, 2011
Life In Retirement: The Not-So-Golden Years

What Is Retirement, Anyway?

Planning for retirement isn't just about mutual funds, 401(k)s and reverse mortgages anymore. With the traditional notions of retirement changing, figuring out how to spend our later years requires a different approach.

2:06am

Fri September 30, 2011
Around the Nation

In Wood Pulp Country, A New Plan For Conservation

Roxanne Quimby, here with Millinocket Lake guide Matt Polstein, wants to donate 70,000 acres of land to the National Park Service along with an endowment to manage what would be a national park in Maine's North Woods.
Susan Sharon for NPR

For more than a decade, there's been talk of creating a new national park in the heart of the Maine woods. Most locals were opposed from the start, but as the economy here changes, opposition is softening.

For generations, Maine's North Woods have provided pulp for the state's paper mills and created plenty of good jobs in an area with little other economic activity. But now the paper industry is struggling and a mill job is no longer a guarantee.

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2:04am

Fri September 30, 2011
Opinion

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The Joy Of Letters

A simple "Wish you were here" can mean so much more than an overwrought email.
istockphoto.com

Postal workers held rallies around the country this week, trying to save their jobs. The U.S. Postal Service faces a deadline Friday for billions of dollars in debt payments it can't afford. It's considering closing hundreds of branches.

Commentator and former NPR East Africa correspondent Gwen Thompkins says she doesn't plan to cut back on writing letters.

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8:00pm

Thu September 29, 2011
StoryCorps

The 'Shot Heard 'Round The World' Echoes Once More

Brooklyn Dodgers fan Harvey Sherman talked about the famous "Shot Heard 'Round the World" with his friend Alex Reisner at StoryCorps in New York City.
StoryCorps

The Boston Red Sox and the Atlanta Braves failed to make baseball's playoffs this week, succumbing to late-season collapses. To some, the swoons brought echoes of 60 years ago, when the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants were vying for the postseason.

As that season ended, the Dodgers lost their hold on first place, forcing them to play their crosstown rivals in a three-game series that would send the winner to the World Series.

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4:33pm

Thu September 29, 2011
Music Interviews

Feist: A Pop Star With A Punk-Rock Past

Feist's new album, Metals, comes out Oct. 4.
Mary Rozzi

It's been four years since Leslie Feist released "1234," the career-making single that also became a testament to the power of a still-nascent YouTube. Feist, who performs under her last name, took some time off from performing after that surge in popularity. But she'll return next week with Metals, her first new album since 2007.

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2:45am

Thu September 29, 2011
Author Interviews

'Hark!': From DNA To JFK, A Comic Take On History

Originally published on Thu September 29, 2011 10:24 am

Drawn and Quarterly

Some say Matthew Henson was the first explorer to get to the North Pole. But Henson was black and the year was 1909, so for a long time the credit went to his white companion, Robert Peary, even though he never set foot on the North Pole.

"Something had happened to him — maybe he was worn down by cold — and he was driven the last bit of the way, I think, by Henson," cartoonist Kate Beaton tells NPR's David Greene.

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6:42am

Wed September 28, 2011
Monkey See

Idris Elba: The Man Who Is Luther, Was Stringer, And Could Be James Bond

Idris Elba as John Luther in Luther, which returns on BBC America Wednesday night.
Kerry Brown BBC America

Idris Elba tells Linda Wertheimer on Wednesday's Morning Edition that he didn't come to the United States from the UK to play "black roles," but merely "roles." And he has: roles like Stringer Bell on HBO's dark drug epic The Wire and John Luther, the central character of Luther, a drama series that returns for a second season tonight on BBC America.

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5:28am

Wed September 28, 2011
Strange News

For A Crocodile, He's Awfully Orange

Originally published on Wed September 28, 2011 7:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: Good morning. I'm David Greene.

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5:22am

Wed September 28, 2011
Strange News

Homesick Minnesotan Makes Logos For State's Lakes

The Land of 10,000 Lakes is being rebranded. Fast Company reports Nicole Meyer missed Minnesota's lakes when she moved away to Phoenix. She's keeping her Midwest roots in mind by designing logos for EACH Minnesota lake. She creates one per day, meaning she will finish in 27 years.

2:19am

Wed September 28, 2011
Herman Cain

Cain's Catchy 9-9-9 Tax Plan Draws Interest, Doubters

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain speaks in Orlando, Fla., on Saturday. He won a GOP straw poll there with 37 percent of the vote.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Last weekend, pizza magnate Herman Cain did something that surprised the political world: He came in first in a Florida GOP presidential straw poll.

One way Cain has attracted the attention of Republican voters is with what he calls his 9-9-9 plan. It's a cleverly marketed idea for changing the nation's tax code.

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10:58pm

Tue September 27, 2011
Planet Money

The Dream Of Europe And The Bailout Of Greece

Peace symbol
Michael Probst AP

"We need Greece," Maurice Minot, a Frankfurt taxi driver, told me, swerving in excitement. "We need Spain, we need Italy. It's the dream for Europeans, for more than a hundred years."

For Minot, as for many Germans on both sides of the debate, the question of bailouts goes beyond narrow self interest. It gets at what it means to be German, and what it means to be European.

Klaus Frankenberger, an editor at the newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, points to the painful labor reforms Germany went through a few years ago.

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8:00pm

Tue September 27, 2011
Sweetness And Light

We're All Just 'Guys'

Opening night for Guys and Dolls on Broadway or, for Frank Deford, "Guys and Guys."
Joe Corrigan Getty Images

As best as I know, I own the distinction of being the first human being to call our national attention to a linguistic phenomenon.

This was back in 1972, in an article in Sports Illustrated about Robyn Smith, who was then the best female jockey in the land. Smith referred to married couples as "you guys." I was so bemused that someone might actually refer to a woman as a guy that I felt obliged to mention it in the piece.

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