Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Hosted by: Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Michael Brasher

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition.  Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.  Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.  Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
NPR Story

Spaniards Learn German In Hopes Of Getting A Job

With Hollywood movies dubbed over in Spanish and steadfast trade with Latin America, Spaniards haven't needed to be bilingual until now. Globalization and a recession have sparked a run on language classes in Spain. But it's not English proficiency they're after. German academies are seeing a surge in enrollment, as Spaniards look northward for jobs in Europe's strongest economy.

2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Europe's Central Bank To Buy Bonds To Steady Stocks

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 7:05 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And late last night, the European Central Bank decided to buy Italian and Spanish bonds to calm market concerns that those two countries would not be able to pay their debts.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Rome.

And Sylvia, how did Italy react to the move by the European Central Bank?

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2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Asian Markets Slide On U.S. Credit Downgrade

Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Anthony Kuhn about the latest on Asian market reaction to the downgraded U.S. credit rating by Standard and Poor's.

2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
NPR Story

Financial Markets Respond To U.S. Credit Downgrade

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 6:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This is one of those mornings when we remember how interconnected the world economy has become. Asian investors are worried about their exports to America. Europeans are responding to their own continent's debt problems, even as they react to the Standard and Poor's downgrade in its rating of U.S. credit. And of course the Dow Jones Industrials, we'll find out how they do today.

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2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
NPR Story

Military Community Mourns Death Of Navy SEALs

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 6:31 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

In Afghanistan, the downing of a helicopter filled with American Special Forces and Afghan troops suggests how great a challenge the Taliban still pose. Officials believe the big Chinook helicopter was shot down by a rocket-propelled grenade, and that attack on Sunday by militants was the deadliest since the war there began.

Of the 30 Americans killed, 22 were members of an elite Navy SEAL team, something particularly poignant given it was Navy SEALS who succeeded so dramatically in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

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10:01pm

Sun August 7, 2011
The Picture Show

Little Pictures, Big Lives: Snapshots Of American Artists

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:35 am

Aline Saarinen taking a photograph, circa 1955
Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution.

Whether you're on vacation or stay-cation this summer, chances are you're taking pictures. Smartphones make picture-taking easier and more popular than ever. But in earlier years, photography was more of an event. At the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art, an exhibition called "Little Pictures, Big Lives" shows snapshots from the 1920s through the '60s. And many of the people in these photos happen to be some of this country's greatest artists.

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10:01pm

Sun August 7, 2011
Living Large: Obesity In America

Big, Fat Stereotypes Play Out On The Small Screen

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 5:00 pm

Jackie Gleason (right) played Ralph Kramden — a bumbling but loveable overweight husband — in the 1950s sitcom The Honeymooners. Audrey Meadows co-starred as his wife, Alice.
Paramount Pictures Getty Images

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America.

About the only thing all real fat people have in common is that they weigh more. Beyond that, they are as diverse in style, background and personality as people who aren't overweight. But on the small screen, fat people get shrunk into the same stereotypes.

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10:01pm

Sun August 7, 2011
Books

A Year Later, Chilean Miners Sift Through Trauma

A year ago, most of the world had never heard of Copiapo, Chile, nor given much attention to the lives of the miners who went down into its copper mines daily. That was until Aug. 5, 2010, when a cave-in at the San Jose copper mine trapped 33 men more than 2,000 feet underground.

Once the Chilean government knew the men were alive, they focused on a massive rescue effort, and after 69 days, the men ascended as celebrities of sorts. A year on, the movie rights have been sold, but fame has not brought the fortune they expected.

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10:01pm

Sun August 7, 2011
All Songs Considered Blog

The Vaccines Make A Music Video With Your Concert Photos

Courtesy of the artist

The Vaccines, a London-based indie rock band with a retro sound, are partnering up with popular photo app Instagram to make a crowdsourced music video for their song "Wetsuit." They're asking fans to share photos from the band's summer tour using the app on their smartphones.

Vaccines guitarist Freddie Cowan, guitarist for The Vaccines, says he's already seen a huge response: "Pictures of people on their campsites and people covered in mud in England or people in the sun in Europe. And candid shots of us."

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9:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
NPR Story

Job Growth In Health, Retail and Manufacturing

The private sector created 154,000 jobs. There was growth in health, retail and manufacturing. But governments cut 37,000 jobs, and a lot of those were the result of the government shutdown in Minnesota. Steve Inskeep gets the latest from NPR's Tamara Keith.

8:32am

Fri August 5, 2011
NPR Story

More Jobs Created Than Economists Expceted

Originally published on Fri August 5, 2011 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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8:10am

Fri August 5, 2011
Economy

Bargain Hunting Maybe Sending U.S. Stocks Up

The fears underlying yesterday's big selloff remain — however, and that's concern over the U.S. economy, and Europe's debt crisis,

6:10am

Fri August 5, 2011
Economy

Unemployment Numbers For July Out Friday

Steve Inskeep talks with NPR's Yuki Noguchi about the latest unemployment data from the federal government.

4:53am

Fri August 5, 2011
Strange News

Thief In N.H. Returns Stolen Items, Apologizes

Last month, a New Hampshire man stole a wallet from a woman's shopping cart, taking $90 and a GPS navigation device. Days later, the man knocked on the woman's door, having also found her address. He said he was sorry as he returned the items. Police say if they find him, they'll arrest him anyway.

4:47am

Fri August 5, 2011
Strange News

Thanks To Monks, Lobsters Avoid Pot, Return To Sea

To celebrate Wheel Turning Day, a group of Tibetan Monks in Massachusetts bought more than 500 lobsters destined for large pots of boiling water and put them in the cool waters of the Atlantic instead. The holiday commemorates Buddha's first sermon, when he spoke of karma; good deeds performed on this day are multiplied.

3:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
Crime In The City

P.I. Kelly: Hot On The Trail Of Crime In Chicago

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:10 am

Michael Harvey's novels focus on cop-turned-P.I. Michael Kelly and his life and work in the Windy City.
Citizen Erased! via Flikr

Michael Harvey has had a panoply of careers. He's been a lawyer and an investigative journalist; he's co-creator of A&E's real-cop TV series, Cold Case Files; and, these days, Harvey is also writing crime novels that show off the grit and the glitz of Chicago.

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2:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
NPR Story

Salmonella Strain In Turkey Recall Resists Antibiotics

Food giant Cargill is recalling 36 million pounds of ground turkey due to suspected contamination with a strain of salmonella that's resistant to antibiotics. With dozens of people reported ill — and one death — this certainly isn't the biggest foodborne illness outbreak. But it's forcing debate on the common yet controversial practice of dosing farm animals with daily antibiotics.

4:52am

Thu August 4, 2011
Sports

Tennis Player Turns Up In Right City, Wrong State

Originally published on Thu August 4, 2011 5:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

At age 19, Bojana Jovanovski is a veteran traveler - the world's 53rd-ranked tennis player. She picked up plane tickets for this week's Mercury Insurance Open in Carlsbad. After several plane changes, she arrived in Carlsbad, New Mexico. And she found herself standing at the airport with her luggage all alone. Only when she called to ask why her ride didn't pick her up did she find the tournament was in Carlsbad, California.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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