5:26am

Thu July 10, 2014
The Two-Way

Hackers In China Reportedly Targeted U.S. Federal Workers

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:01 am

Chinese hackers successfully accessed U.S. government computer networks in March apparently hoping to find information about "tens of thousands of employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances," The New York Times reports.

The newspaper says the attack centered on the Office of Personnel Management was reportedly detected and blocked — but not before the hackers had gotten into some of the agency's databases.

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5:25am

Thu July 10, 2014
Around the Nation

Duke Bourbon Raises Challenge From University

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:47 am

The estate of actor John Wayne, who was known as the Duke, wants to sell a brand of bourbon with his likeness. Duke University says the bourbon would tarnish the Duke name.

5:13am

Thu July 10, 2014
Digital Life

Fake Edward Snowden Joins Tinder

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:47 am

The popular dating app Tinder has a new user: Edward Snowden. Actually, just the username Lonely Ed with the profile picture of the NSA leaker looking for love from Moscow.

5:08am

Thu July 10, 2014
Television

'Breaking Bad' Expected To Get Emmy Nod For Final Season

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:47 am

Nominations for the 2014 Emmy Awards are announced in Hollywood Thursday. The big category this year is expected to be drama with shows like True Detective, Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones and Fargo.

3:28am

Thu July 10, 2014
Asia

China's Booming Real Estate Market Finally Begins To Slide

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:38 am

Villas in a luxury compound in Wuxi, in China's eastern Jiangsu province, sit empty after a year while more apartment blocks rise in the distance.
Frank Langfitt NPR

After years of stunning growth, China's go-go real estate market is now in retreat.

Prices fell last month in 79 out of 100 cities, according to the China Real Estate Index run by SouFun Holdings, a real estate website. Land sales dropped nearly 30 percent this spring from a year earlier.

Real estate has been one of the engines driving the world's second-largest economy, which is why economists in China and around the world are watching the market closely these days.

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3:01am

Thu July 10, 2014
Business

Rejoice! Chocodiles Are Back

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:45 am

For years, the chocolate-covered Twinkies were only available in selected markets. In June, the company got a new CEO, and this week Hostess announced the return of the Chocodile.

3:01am

Thu July 10, 2014
Religion

FBI, NSA Spied On American Muslims, Report Says

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:47 am

The latest revelation from Edward Snowden's NSA trove is a story that appeared in the online publication The Intercept. Five prominent Muslim citizens say they were spied on because they're Muslims.

3:01am

Thu July 10, 2014
Around the Nation

University Of Michigan Plant Is Definitely A Late Bloomer

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:47 am

A botanist at the University of Michigan describes a plant that is blooming at the arboretum there for the first time in 80 years.

1:29am

Thu July 10, 2014
The Salt

From McDonald's To Organic Valley, You're Probably Eating Wood Pulp

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:30 am

You can find wood pulp in several brands of packaged shredded cheese. It helps keep the cheese from clumping.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Do not be alarmed, but you may be eating wood pulp. Or at least an additive that started out as wood.

If you buy shredded cheeses, including brands such as Organic Valley and Sargento, or hit the drive-through at McDonald's for a breakfast sandwich or a smoothie, or douse some ribs with bottled barbecue sauce, there's likely some cellulose that's been added to your food.

Cellulose is basically plant fiber, and one of the most common sources is wood pulp. Manufacturers grind up the wood and extract the cellulose.

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1:28am

Thu July 10, 2014
Space

The Little Spacecraft That Couldn't

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:47 am

Early days: NASA's International Sun-Earth Explorer C (also known as ISEE-3 and ICE) was undergoing testing and evaluation inside the Goddard Space Flight Center's dynamic test chamber when this photo was snapped in 1976.
NASA

An audacious quest to reconnect with a vintage NASA spacecraft has suffered a serious setback and is now pretty much over.

The satellite launched in 1978 and has been in a long, looping orbit around the sun for about three decades. Earlier this year, NPR told you about an effort to get in touch with this venerable piece of NASA hardware and send it on one more adventure.

But there are no guarantees when you try to recapture the past.

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