2:53am

Fri March 22, 2013
Around the Nation

Kids' Voices Key On Both Sides Of Gay-Marriage Debate

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:21 pm

The Rev. Gene Robinson, along with his daughter Ella and partner Mark Andrew, attend a news conference after Robinson was confirmed as bishop of the Episcopal Church in Minneapolis in 2003. Robinson was the church's first openly gay bishop, and his daughter is an advocate for gay marriage.
Eric Miller Getty Images

When the Supreme Court takes up same-sex marriage next week, much of the debate will revolve around children. Opponents have long argued that kids' best interests require both a mom and a dad. Recently, however, more children of same-sex couples have started speaking out for themselves.

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2:40am

Fri March 22, 2013
Middle East

Obama Asks Young Israelis To Push For Peace

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:24 am

President Obama is urging both Israelis and Palestinians not to abandon long-stalled peace talks. The president has been practicing some low-key shuttle diplomacy this week.

2:38am

Fri March 22, 2013
Iraq

'Tiny Fraction' Took Advantage During Iraq's Reconstruction

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All this week on MORNING EDITION, we've been marking the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. That invasion was followed by years of war and reconstruction, the war and reconstruction taking place at the same time.

And today, to get a better idea of the monetary costs, we speak with Stuart Bowen once again. Since 2004, he has been the Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. And earlier this month, he released the final report from his office.

Stuart Bowen is in Baghdad. Welcome back to the program.

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1:02am

Fri March 22, 2013
Research News

Mosh Pit Math: Physicists Analyze Rowdy Crowd

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Fans in the mosh pit during the performance of Liturgy at the 2012 Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, on July 14, 2012.
Roger Kisby Getty Images

1:01am

Fri March 22, 2013
Movies

Not Doing So 'Boffo,' 'Daily Variety' Drops Print Edition

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Print versions of Daily Variety, like this one from 2003, will no longer be available on L.A. newsstands. Variety will continue online and in a print weekly, but the daily print edition is being dropped.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

For eight decades, Daily Variety has been a Hollywood must-read for everyone from studio heads to actors looking for a big break. But the days of assistants running out to grab the "trades" are over: This week, the Los Angeles institution published its last daily edition.

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1:00am

Fri March 22, 2013
All Tech Considered

After Conquering Consoles, Hard-Core Gaming Shifts To Mobile

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Gears of War: Judgment hit stores on Tuesday.
Courtesy Microsoft Studios

This generation of video game consoles will be remembered for over-the-top, knock-you-out-of-your-seat extravaganza games like Halo, Call of Duty — and Gears of War, a juggernaut of a game. The first three Gears of War sold 19 million units, making it a $1 billion franchise. And the latest, Gears of War: Judgment, has just hit stores at a crucial time in the video game industry — sales are down, new Xbox and PlayStation consoles are due out, and mobile gaming is growing.

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1:00am

Fri March 22, 2013
Business

Google's Eric Schmidt Heads To Another Isolated Asian Nation

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman and former CEO, stands near a statue of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang in January. He's headed now to Myanmar, another largely untapped market.
David Guttenfelder AP

Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, who went to North Korea in January, is making a short visit Friday to Myanmar, also known as Burma.

Why is the senior executive of a U.S. technology powerhouse visiting some of the poorest and least wired countries in Asia?

Schmidt will be the first top U.S. executive to travel to the Southeast Asian nation since it began emerging from decades of international isolation under a military dictatorship.

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12:58am

Fri March 22, 2013
Iraq

Revisiting Iraq: A Sister On The Edge

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:24 pm

It's been 10 years since the U.S. invaded Iraq. This week we're taking a look back, revisiting voices you first heard on NPR in 2007. We brought you the story of two sisters who had lost their parents. The older sister wore conservative clothes and recited poetry. The younger sister, just 13 at the time, appeared on the verge of becoming a prostitute.

Like so many stories in Iraq, especially sensitive ones involving shame and sex, this story has to be peeled away in layers, like an onion.

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12:01am

Fri March 22, 2013
StoryCorps

Living And Loving Through The Bubonic Plague

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:55 am

John Tull, 63, and Lucinda Marker, 57, survived a bout of the bubonic plague in 2002.
StoryCorps

The bubonic plague killed about one-third of Europe's population during the Middle Ages, but today the bacterial infection rarely shows up in the U.S. Only a handful of people catch it each year.

But in 2002, Lucinda Marker and her husband, John Tull, were bitten by fleas infected with the plague near their home in New Mexico. They then took a trip to New York City.

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11:55pm

Thu March 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Investigators Seek Link Between Texas Car Chase, Colorado Shooting

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 6:25 am

Earlier this week, we told you about the head of Colorado's Department of Corrections who was shot and killed after answering the front door of his home.

On Thursday, a Colorado parolee who may be linked to Tom Clements' killing led Texas deputies on a high-speed car chase that ended only when he crashed into a semitrailer, opened fire and was subsequently shot down.

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