12:14pm

Thu June 21, 2012
The Salt

California Dairy Farmers Split Over Milk Payments In Farm Bill

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

A dairy cow peeks out of its stall at Case van Steyn's dairy in Galt, Calif.
Kathleen Masterson NPR

California is known as the land of fruits and nuts, but it also happens to be the country's largest milk-producing state. So it's no surprise that its dairy farmers are front and center in the debate over reforming the milk marketing system, which hasn't really changed much in 30 years.

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12:02pm

Thu June 21, 2012
The Two-Way

U.N. Investigator: U.S. Drone Program May Challenge International Law

President Obama's use of drones, and his direct involvement in who they target, has both U.S. and international communities questioning the administration's secret drone policy.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

A United Nations investigator on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions says the United States drone strikes may challenge international law.

The Guardian reports that Christof Heyns made the comments in a meeting organized by the American Civil Liberties Union in Geneva.

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11:33am

Thu June 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Life Over 50 Can Include An Eating Disorder

Sean Locke iStockphoto.com

Eating disorders aren't just a problem for teens and young women.

Many women over 50 grapple with issues related to body image and food, a new study finds.

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11:08am

Thu June 21, 2012
Science

5 Ways to Spark Your Creativity

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 2:49 pm

Taking a shower may help inspire big ideas. Working in a blue room may help, too.
Ayodha Ouditt NPR

Innovation is the name of the game these days — in business, in science and technology, even in art. We all want to get those big ideas, but most of us really have no idea what sets off those sparks of insight. Science can help! In the past few years, neuroscientists and psychologists have started to gain a better understanding of the creative process. Some triggers of innovation may be surprisingly simple. Here are five things that may well increase the odds of having an "Aha!" moment.

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11:03am

Thu June 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

How To Spot A 'Neglected Tropical Disease'

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 8:34 am

A female mosquito acquires a blood meal. This species, Aedes aegypti, carries and transmits the dengue fever virus.
James Gathany CDC

There's an easy way to spot diseases that aren't getting much attention.

You don't even have to leave your chair, if you've got a computer and access to databases of scientific papers published around the world. Just compare the number of papers on a disease with the number of people affected by it.

Simple, right?

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10:24am

Thu June 21, 2012
The Two-Way

As Closing Arguments Begin, Judge Tosses Three Counts Against Sand

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 11:34 am

Jerry Sandusky arrives at the courthouse on Thursday for closing arguments of his sexual abuse trial, at the Centre County Courthouse, in Bellefonte, Pa.
Nabil K. Mark AP

Update at 1:31 p.m. ET. Case Goes To Jury:

The Patriot-News, which is following the Sandusky case live, reports that the prosecution has delivered its closing arguments and the case has now been turned over the jury.

Our Original Post Continues:

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10:23am

Thu June 21, 2012
Remembrances

Fresh Air Remembers Film Critic Andrew Sarris

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 10:56 am

Film critic Andrew Sarris was married to fellow critic Molly Haskell.
Dave Kotinsky Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on August 8, 1990.

Andrew Sarris, who popularized the auteur theory and was called the "dean of American film critics," died on Wednesday. He was 83.

In 1962, Sarris became the first American film critic to write about the auteur theory. That's the idea that the director of a movie is the person most responsible for it, and that movies can be better understood if they're seen in the context of a director's complete body of work.

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10:11am

Thu June 21, 2012
Television

'The Newsroom' Caught Up In A Partisan Divide

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 10:56 am

In Aaron Sorkin's new HBO drama, The Newsroom, producer MacKenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) and anchorman Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) tackle real hard-hitting news stories and call out those who don't tell the truth.
HBO

If anyone in Hollywood wears his idealism like a boutonniere, it's Aaron Sorkin. As The West Wing made clear, Sorkin loves telling stories about principled individuals — especially liberals — struggling with institutions that might compromise their integrity.

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9:55am

Thu June 21, 2012
Business

The Impossible Juggling Act: Motherhood And Work

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 10:56 am

iStockphoto.com

For two years, Princeton professor Anne-Marie Slaughter was the director of policy planning at the State Department. It was her "dream job" — the job she imagined herself doing in college.

"I loved the work," she tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It was work I was so passionate about."

Slaughter commuted to the State Department in Washington, D.C., every week from Princeton, N.J., where her husband and two teenage sons lived.

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9:53am

Thu June 21, 2012
Education

Title IX Turns 40, But Has The Field Leveled?

Title IX was the landmark legislation that required most educational institutions to offer equal opportunities for girls and boys. It changed history and opened up the floodgates to basketball courts, soccer fields and classrooms to women all over the country. Host Michel Martin speaks with three experts about what more needs to be done.

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