3:05pm

Mon June 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Paralympic Cyclists Inspire Each Other, And A Documentary

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 4:44 am

Paralympic cyclists are featured in the upcoming documentary Unstoppables.
black train films

The opening ceremony of the London 2012 Summer Olympics are just over a month away — leading NPR and other media to cover the intense preparations for the games. That also means the Paralympic Games are on the way, as athletes with physical disabilities round into top form for the Aug. 29 opening day.

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2:40pm

Mon June 25, 2012
NPR Story

Why Isn't Kaiser Permanente Cheaper?

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 3:18 pm

Kaiser Permanente, the California-based managed care consortium, is touted as a model for saving money in the health care system. But they are not as inexpensive as they used to be.

2:40pm

Mon June 25, 2012
NPR Story

And This Little Piggy Made ... A Home Of Books?

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now to a literary construction zone. Commentator Andrei Codrescu is starting a building project using books.

ANDREI CODRESCU, BYLINE: I put out the word that I'm making a house out of books, and thousands of books started arriving by truck, big publishers' remainders, 100 years of bad taste in hardback. My building made of books grew from a shack to a palace the size of Versailles made entirely out of bestsellers.

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2:34pm

Mon June 25, 2012
National Security

FBI Tracking 100 Suspected Extremists In Military

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

The FBI is investigating more than 100 suspected Muslim extremists who are part of the U.S. military community, officials tell NPR. U.S. authorities have increased scrutiny since the 2009 shooting attack at Fort Hood, Texas, that left 13 dead. Maj. Nidal Hasan, charged with the killings, is shown here in an April 2010 court hearing.
Handout Getty Images

The FBI has conducted more than 100 investigations into suspected Islamic extremists within the military, NPR has learned. About a dozen of those cases are considered serious.

Officials define that as a case requiring a formal investigation to gather information against suspects who appear to have demonstrated a strong intent to attack military targets. This is the first time the figures have been publicly disclosed.

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2:26pm

Mon June 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Supreme Court's Arizona Ruling Could Aid Obama While Vexing Romney

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 6:47 am

The political impact of Monday's Supreme Court ruling that three of four provisions of Arizona's immigration enforcement law are unconstitutional — and that a fourth could eventually be found to be — certainly appeared, at first blush, to be a significant political win for President Obama.

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2:10pm

Mon June 25, 2012
Music Reviews

A Posthumous Masterpiece Adds To E.S.T.'s Legacy

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 8:51 am

E.S.T. was Esbjorn Svensson, Dan Berglund and Magnus Ostrom.
Jim Rakete

When the pianist Esbjorn Svensson died in a scuba accident in 2008, many fans of his group, the Swedish trio known as E.S.T., wondered if there might be some unreleased experiments lurking in a studio vault. There were. Just out is a disc called 301, which was recorded in 2008 during sessions for the group's final album.

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1:11pm

Mon June 25, 2012
The Salt

Cooking Regional Food When You're Far From The Fava Beans

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:19 pm

Chef Mino Massi and his son Robi prep food from Puglia at the Washington, D.C. convention center.
Nancy Shute NPR

How do you showcase regional food when you're not in the region? Don't smuggle the salami in, that's for sure.

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1:05pm

Mon June 25, 2012
The Two-Way

80 Percent Of Lightning Strike Victims Are Male, But Why?

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:42 pm

Lightning streaks across the sky in Tyler, Texas, as a powerful line of thunderstorms moved across the state in April.
Dr. Scott M. Lieberman AP

This tweet from the National Weather Service caught our attention, today:

"More than 80% of lightning victims are male. Be a force of nature by knowing your risk, taking action and being an example"

Eighty percent seemed to us pretty significant, so we turned to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and asked, "Why?"

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1:03pm

Mon June 25, 2012
Law

Immigration Ruling May Close, Open Legal Windows

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:16 am

Arizona Republican Gov. Jan Brewer leaves a podium at the state Capitol in Phoenix after responding to President Obama's immigration speech on June 15. Brewer said the speech represented a "pre-emptive strike" aimed at what then was an upcoming Supreme Court ruling on Arizona's immigration law.
Matt York AP

The Supreme Court's decision to strike down much of Arizona's immigration law is being hailed as a victory by both sides in a fight likely to spawn many more legal battles.

Monday, the court struck down three of four provisions in the law but upheld, at least for the moment, a controversial measure allowing police to check the immigration status of anyone stopped or detained for any reason.

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12:22pm

Mon June 25, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Teenage Brain: Gateway To A 'Bright And Dark' World

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 3:27 pm

Cover detail

Meg Wolitzer is a novelist whose most recent works include The Uncoupling and a book for young readers, The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman.

You know how people talk about so-called gateway drugs — drugs that lead to harder ones? I think some books can be considered gateway books, because reading them leads you to start reading other books that are similar but more intense. Lisa, Bright and Dark, John Neufeld's 1969 novel for young adults, is one of these.

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