5:41am

Sat April 21, 2012
Sports

Sports: Who's Starting Baseball Season Well

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 11:31 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Let me hang up the phone now. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: Baseball's fast starts - some teams founder early and the anniversary of the Big Green Monster. Errrrr. Howard Bryant joins us, senior writer for ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine; joins us from New England Public Radio in Amherst, Massachusetts. Howard, thanks for being with us.

HOWARD BRYANT: Hey, Scott. How are you?

SIMON: Fine, thanks.

BRYANT: So, who's off to a good start and who hasn't had a good time at all?

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5:41am

Sat April 21, 2012
Europe

Nazi Past Has French Town Wary Of Far-Right Politics

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Voters go to the polls tomorrow in France to cast ballots in the first round of their presidential election. President Nicolas Sarkozy still trails his socialist opponent Francois Hollande. Mr. Sarkozy has tried to close that gap by appealing to voters on the right. Much of the French campaign this time around focused on right-wing issues like crime, security and immigration.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited a town in France that is still haunted by ghosts of its far-right past, to see what people think about that.

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5:41am

Sat April 21, 2012
Presidential Race

Showing The Money: Campaign Finances Disclosed

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 3:10 pm

Mitt Romney may like to say the president is out of ideas, but Obama's re-election campaign is definitely not out of money.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

We have a new look at the fundraising contest being waged by President Obama and apparent Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Their campaign committees filed monthly disclosures Friday night at the Federal Election Commission — as did superPACs that are active in the presidential contest.

Their reports show a turning point in the campaign as the president's re-election operation powers toward November and the Romney team revs up after the GOP primary contest.

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5:16am

Sat April 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Lights Off, Eyes Open: New Moon Darkens Skies For Meteor Shower

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:58 pm

A composite of Lyrids over Huntsville, Ala., in 2009. This year, the meteor shower will hit its peak before dawn Sunday morning.
Danielle Moser/MSFC NASA

Tonight is a good night for a meteor shower. The Lyrids aren't known for their flashy shows, but this year they're getting help from a new moon.

The dark skies will be "ideal for meteor watching from the ground," NASA says.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky and Telescope magazine, tells Weekend Edition host Scott Simon the best views are from the darkest places.

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Meg Cramer is a Public Insight Journalist for Changing Gears at Michigan Radio.

4:27am

Sat April 21, 2012
The Salt

The Cuban Sandwich Crisis: Tampa V. Miami For The Win

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:13 am

Some of the sandwiches in question, getting a press on the grill
floridagirlindc Flickr.com

Call it the Cuban Sandwich Crisis. Two cities, Tampa and Miami, are locked in a battle to claim the Cuban sandwich as its own. It's a battle for hearts, minds and bellies. And you get to weigh in. Read on!

For the uninitiated, a Cuban sandwich is shredded pork, glazed ham, Swiss cheese, yellow mustard, and dill pickles – served either cold or hot-pressed on Cuban bread. Think of it as the ham-and-cheese for the guayabera-wearing set.

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4:26am

Sat April 21, 2012
Around the Nation

'A Chance To Start Over': Wounded Vets Ride Again

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 1:39 pm

Brothers Deven (left) and Erik Schei ride by President Barack Obama on the South Lawn of the White House as part of the sixth annual Wounded Warrior Project's Soldier Ride on Friday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

A group of military veterans has been riding bikes this week in and around Washington, D.C. Many of the bikes have been reconfigured so that soldiers who lost limbs and suffered wounds in war could feel the power in their grace and the wind in their faces.

They joined the annual, four-day Soldier Ride, held in cities across the country and organized by the Wounded Warriors Project.

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4:23am

Sat April 21, 2012
Economy

What's It Worth?: Historic Detroit Mansion For Sale

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 5:40 am

Stone Hedge, a 10,000-square-foot Detroit mansion built in 1915 is listed at less than $450,000.
Jessica J. Trevino Detroit Free Press

Even before the financial crisis, Detroit was known for its undervalued real estate. Now, a bad situation is even worse.

Michael Bradley and his sister Annette Foreman have spent the last several months cleaning their mother's home. She died on Christmas Eve last year, and they're putting her house up for sale.

The four-story house, known as Stone Hedge, was originally built for Walter O. Briggs in 1915. Briggs was in the car business. His company built auto bodies, and he owned the Detroit Tigers.

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4:22am

Sat April 21, 2012
Europe

Emerging Markets Promise IMF Financial Firepower

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:46 am

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde announced Friday that the IMF had raised $430 billion, surpassing its stated goal.
Charles Dharapak AP

International Monetary Fund officials and members of the G-20 nations announced Friday that member countries have pledged $430 billion to add to the Fund's crisis-fighting arsenal.

The Fund's managing director Christine Lagarde came into the annual World Bank-IMF spring meetings in Washington, D.C., with a goal of raising $400 billion from member states. She was clearly happy and relieved as she announced a number larger than that.

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4:22am

Sat April 21, 2012
Europe

Amid Europe's Debt Crisis, A Sharp Rise In Suicides

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 6:47 pm

Mourners gather at the spot in front of the Greek parliament in Athens where 77-year-old retired pharmacist Dimitris Christoulas shot and killed himself on April 4. Christoulas left a note saying he did not want to end up scrounging for food in garbage bins.
Simela Pantzartzi EPA/Landov

The eurozone crisis has been under way for three years and has led to sharp welfare cutbacks and a credit crunch throughout the continent.

But one of the most serious effects of the financial crisis has been an alarming spike in suicides in debt-burdened Greece, Ireland and Italy.

Last Wednesday, about a 1,000 people gathered in central Rome for a candle-lit vigil to honor Italy's economic victims. Statics show that from 2009 and 2010, some 400 small-business owners took their lives.

There have already been 23 crisis-related suicides since January.

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