KANW-FM

Colin Dwyer

A passenger train smashed into the back of another train outside the Egyptian city of Alexandria on Friday afternoon. More than 40 people died and about 120 others were injured, according to news reports citing Egypt's health ministry.

It was not immediately clear what caused the crash. Egypt's top prosecutor, Nabil Sadek, has summoned railway officials for questioning, and President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi has ordered the formation of a task force to investigate the incident.

Updated 5:50 p.m. ET

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta has won a second five-year term, the country's electoral commission announced Friday. The official results show Kenyatta achieving re-election comfortably, with a lead of more than 1.4 million votes over his principal challenger, Raila Odinga.

"We are all citizens of one republic," Kenyatta said on national television after what was a bruising and bitter campaign.

In the past two years, Yemen has endured no end of crises.

At least 10,000 people have been killed in the war between Iran-backed Houthis and the Saudi-led coalition seeking to oust them from power. Still, Yemen's health ministry says that violence has exacted a smaller death toll than the closure of the airport in the capital, Sanaa, which has left thousands more people incapable of seeking medical treatment abroad.

Ruth Pfau was not supposed to go to Pakistan.

The German-born nun and doctor had been sent by her Catholic order to India. But on her way, in 1960, visa hang-ups forced her to stop in the Pakistani city of Karachi — and that was where she encountered the leprosy patient whose plight persuaded her to stay.

One thing, at least, is not in dispute: Supermarkets in several countries across Europe have pulled eggs from their shelves for fear they were contaminated with Fipronil, an insecticide that's typically used to kill lice and ticks — and that has the potential to harm humans. The contamination became a public scandal earlier this month.

That's about where the agreement ends, however.

Many believe this dinosaur is the largest to ever walk the Earth.

It would have weighed more than 10 African elephants put together and had a thighbone taller than the man who helped dig it up. And, fair warning, it stands at such a remarkable height that it might take a little scrolling to get through its portrait.

But for years, there was one thing the big guy didn't have: a proper scientific name.

In a region better known for its ice and snow, it's a fire that now has scientists struggling to learn more. Since at least the end of last month, a stretch of land in western Greenland has been alight with a "sizable wildfire," NASA says.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

Venezuela's highest court has ordered the arrest of a mayor allied with the opposition to President Nicolas Maduro. The order handed down Tuesday by the Supreme Court formally fired Ramon Muchacho, mayor of the capital's wealthiest district, Chacao, and sentenced him to 15 months in prison.

In a brief BBC cartoon posted to YouTube late last December, a high-ranking Roman soldier and his family tackle the challenges of daily life in ancient Britain. The dad is off helping build the famed Hadrian's wall at the province's far northern edge; the son tries to make right for losing his father's scarf. Everyone ends up happy ever after.

The attack took all of half an hour.

That's about how long Sam Kanizay says he spent relaxing waist-deep in the waters of Melbourne, Australia's Brighton Beach on Saturday. The 16-year-old had been footsore from a round of soccer, he says, and the cold water felt pleasant as he absently listened to songs on his iPhone.

Lately it's been impossible to miss.

In Warsaw and Brussels, deep in primeval forests and overlooking the soccer pitch, the bad blood between the Polish government and the European Union officials appears to be seeping into just about every evident interaction — and as European Council President Donald Tusk observed Thursday, it's threatening to rend their relationship apart.

For decades, Chile has boasted one of the world's strictest abortion bans. Passed in the final years of dictator Augusto Pinochet's reign, the rule has for nearly three decades outlawed the procedure without exception, placing Chile among just a few countries worldwide to do so.

Decades after the U.S. government exposed service members to chemical weapons in secret experiments, lawmakers have advanced a measure intended to make it easier for those World War II veterans to obtain compensation. The bill, known as the Arla Harrell Act, advanced to President Trump's desk after Senate approval Wednesday.

Two U.S. service members were killed Wednesday when a NATO convoy came under attack outside the southern Afghan city of Kandahar, according to the Pentagon. It was not immediately clear how many people were wounded in the violence, which unfolded near an American base.

The Taliban quickly claimed responsibility for the bombing, saying a militant carried out a suicide attack with a truck packed with explosives.

Ara Parseghian, a Hall of Fame coach who guided not one but three major college football programs to national prominence, died in the early hours of Wednesday at age 94. The president of the University of Notre Dame, where Parseghian steered the team from losing records to a pair of national championships, announced his death in an extensive tribute online.

A Shiite mosque in western Afghanistan was stormed during evening prayers Tuesday, torn asunder by grenades and a suicide bomber's detonated vest, law enforcement officials say. By the time the scene had settled at the place of worship, at least 29 people were killed and dozens more were injured.

And local officials say the death toll could still rise.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

The Department of Homeland Security announced Tuesday that it will use its authority to bypass environmental laws and other regulations to "ensure the expeditious construction of barriers and roads" near the U.S.-Mexico border south of San Diego.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and many of the country's highest officials gathered Tuesday in Beijing to celebrate the 90th anniversary of the People's Liberation Army — and to offer two strongly worded reminders to watchers at home and abroad: China's armed forces serve at the will of the Communist Party, Xi said, and those armed forces are prepared to protect the country's territorial interests.

Just one day after a nationwide vote to consolidate Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's hold on power, the U.S. Treasury Department has leveled a new round of sanctions against the regime — this time against Maduro himself.

"All assets of Nicolas Maduro subject to U.S. jurisdiction are frozen," the department announced in a statement Monday, "and U.S. persons are prohibited from dealing with him."

Updated 9:45 p.m. ET

The vacation wasn't supposed to end this way — or end so early.

Updated at 8:25 p.m. ET

North Korea said early Saturday that its intercontinental ballistic missile test on Friday showed its program could hit the United States, according to a statement reported by The Associated Press and Reuters.

The U.S. Department of Defense says the missile, which launched just before midnight local time, traveled roughly 620 miles — from the country's northern province of Jagang to the Sea of Japan, where it finally splashed into the waters off Japan's west coast.

It has been 80 years since J.M. Barrie died. It has been even longer since Peter Pan's creator penned The Reconstruction of the Crime with humorist E.V. Lucas — and yet in all this time, editor Andrew Gulli says the brief play the pair pulled together never glimpsed the stage or even the printed page.

For an entire generation of writers, Michiko Kakutani acted at times as intrepid champion, hated villain or helping hand. But from her perch as chief book critic at The New York Times, the Pulitzer Prize winner rarely left one thing in doubt: her vast influence over the literary world she assessed.

On Thursday, after 38 years, Kakutani announced she is stepping down.

Updated 8:25 p.m. ET

Just days away from a national vote to decide the delegates who will rewrite Venezuela's constitution, President Nicolas Maduro's government is trying a new method of clamping down on popular unrest: a complete ban on demonstrations nationwide for the next five days.

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