Renee Montagne

Renee Montagne is co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the U.S. She has hosted the newsmagazine since 2004, broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with co-host Steve Inskeep in NPR's Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Montagne is a familiar voice on NPR, having reported and hosted since the mid-1980s. She hosted All Things Considered with Robert Siegel for two years in the late 1980s, and previously worked for NPR's Science, National and Foreign desks.

Montagne traveled to Greenwich, England, in May 2007 to kick off the yearlong series, "Climate Connections," in which NPR partnered with National Geographic to chronicle how people are changing the Earth's climate and how the climate is impacting people. From the prime meridian, she laid out the journey that would take listeners to Africa, New Orleans and the Antarctic.

Since 9/11, Montagne has gone to Afghanistan nine times, travelling throughout the country to speak to Afghans about their lives. She's interviewed farmers and mullahs, poll workers and President Karzai, infamous warlords turned politicians and women fighting for their rights. She has produced several series, beginning in 2002 with 'Recreating Afghanistan" and most recently, in 2013, asking a new generation of Afghans — born into the long war set off by the Soviet invasion — how they see their country's future.

In the spring of 2005, Montagne took Morning Edition to Rome for the funeral of Pope John Paul ll. She co-anchored from Vatican City during a historic week when millions of pilgrims and virtually every world leader descended on the Vatican.

In 1990, Montagne traveled to South Africa to cover Nelson Mandela's release from prison, and continued to report from South Africa for three years. In 1994, she and a team of NPR reporters won a prestigious Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of South Africa's historic presidential and parliamentary elections.

Through most of the 1980s, Montagne was based in New York, working as an independent producer and reporter for both NPR and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Prior to that, she worked as a reporter/editor for Pacific News Service in San Francisco. She began her career as news director of the city's community radio station, KPOO, while still at university.

In addition to the duPont Columbia Award, Montagne has been honored by the Overseas Press Club for her coverage of Afghanistan, and by the National Association of Black Journalists for a series on Black musicians going to war in the 20th century.

Montagne graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, as a Phi Beta Kappa. Her career includes serving as a fellow at the University of Southern California with the National Arts Journalism Program, and teaching broadcast writing at New York University's Graduate Department of Journalism.

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2:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Penn State Child Sex Abuse Scandal Still Raises Questions

The child sex abuse scandal at Penn State is raising more and more questions about who knew what, when and what actions were, or were not taken. Elements of the unfolding scandal remain quite confusing. Former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky is charged with abusing young boys.

7:15am

Fri November 4, 2011
NPR Story

Groupon Makes Market Debut

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 7:15 am

Shares of the daily deal company Groupon hit the Nasdaq stock exchange Friday after an IPO raised about $700 million. The company has been dogged by investor concerns over management and questions about its accounting methods.

3:53am

Fri November 4, 2011
Strange News

England's Oldest Family-Run Business Still Selling

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 8:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with congratulations to R.J. Balson and Son. The butcher shop on the south coast of England has been named Britain's oldest family-run business, and is it ever. Balson's began selling sausages and bacon in 1535 when Henry VIII was king and still married to Ann Boleyn. Twenty-five generations later, owner Richard Balson tells the Daily Mail his son will join the business next year, and that son has a son, too. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:15am

Thu November 3, 2011
Strange News

Woman Passes Driver's Test While In Labor

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 5:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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2:00am

Wed November 2, 2011
Politics

Head Of Ariz. Redistricting Commission Fired

Originally published on Wed November 2, 2011 12:52 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Arizona is one of a handful of states that hands the redistricting to an independent commission, instead of its legislature. At least that's what's supposed to happen. In a stunning move last night, though, the Arizona Senate and its governor ousted the head of the state's independent commission.

NPR's Ted Robbins joins us from our bureau in Tucson to explain. Good morning, Ted.

TED ROBBINS, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: What exactly happened?

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2:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
Europe

Hurdles Facing EU Leaders At Brussels Debt Summit

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

The European Union is facing the worst crisis in its history and it has to the potential to affect us all. The meltdown in Greece could eventually imperil the entire global financial system. Today in Brussels, Europe's leaders will make another attempt at finalizing a eurozone survival plan. But time is short and the stakes could not be higher. The key players have big national issues to worry about.

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2:00am

Tue October 18, 2011
Middle East

Israeli Soldier Freed In Exchange For Palestinian Prisoners

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 6:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

A dramatic prisoner swap is underway now, between Israel and the Palestinians. After five years in captivity, Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, is free. He is in Israel, and we'll go there in a moment.

First, to the West Bank and the city of Ramallah. That's where NPR's Peter Kenyon is, surrounded by a jubilant crowd of Palestinians.

Good morning, Peter.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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2:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Sports

Indy Champ Wheldon Dies In Vegas Speedway Crash

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 3:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The world of IndyCar racing has lost one of its stars. Two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dan Wheldon was killed yesterday during an IndyCar race in Las Vegas. Wheldon was trailing a pack of cars when he was unable to avoid a massive pile-up.

(SOUNDBITE OF BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Oh, here we go. (Unintelligible) a huge crash. Up at turn number two. Oh, multiple cars involved.

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2:00am

Fri September 9, 2011
Afghanistan

A Decade Ago, Massoud's Killing Preceded Sept. 11

In Afghanistan, Ahmed Shah Massoud was known as the Lion of Panshir. And thanks to him, the Panshir Valley was one of only two places the Taliban never conquered. On Sept. 9, 2001, suicide bombers killed Massoud.

2:00am

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

How Jalalabad Became A Hot Bed Of Afghan Insurgency

Reporting from Afghanistan, Morning Edition's Renee Montagne looks at the city of Jalalabad. That's where top al Qaida leaders were last seen as they fled Kabul, and disappeared into the mountains of Tora Bora on their way to Pakistan.

2:00am

Mon August 22, 2011
Africa

White House Says It's Time For Gadhafi To Go

President Obama says it is time for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's regime to officially end. The U.S. has played a key role in supporting the NATO campaign that began in March — aimed at protecting civilians and the rebels.

2:00am

Mon August 22, 2011
Middle East

Assad Warns Other Countries To Stay Out of Syria

Syria's president Bashar Assad has warned against military intervention in his country. He appeared on state-run television Sunday and repeated plans to introduce political change to the country.

2:00am

Wed August 17, 2011
Media

Documents Revive Focus On Murdoch's Phone-Hacking Scandal

In London, a parliamentary committee has released documents that question James Murdoch's July testimony about the News of the World phone-hacking scandal. A newly revealed letter from a jailed reporter claims hacking was "widely discussed" at editorial meetings at the now closed British paper.

2:00am

Mon August 15, 2011
Africa

Defiant Gadhafi Pushes Rebels To Fight On

Originally published on Mon August 15, 2011 4:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Let's turn now to another story we're following: Libya, where rebel forces have made some dramatic gains. Rebels have fought their way out of the mountains to a key coastal city just 30 miles from the Libyan capital of Tripoli.

In a defiant speech last night, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi exhorted his followers to fight, even as reports surfaced of talks between the regime and the rebels.

We've got NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro on the line. She's in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi.

And Lulu, what is the latest?

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4:35am

Thu August 11, 2011
Europe

Massive Police Presence Helps Quell British Riots

The streets of London and other British cities were mostly quiet Wednesday night amid a massive police presence that has helped stop the wave of violence and looting that's wracked Britain since the weekend. Courts there worked through the night to process some of those arrested. Parliament is meeting for an emergency session after Prime Minister David Cameron recalled members from their summer break.

8:25am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

U.S. Stocks Fall On Downgrade Of U.S. Credit

U.S. markets have opened for the first time since Standard and Poor's downgraded the nation's credit rating. The Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 250 points minutes after the opening bell on Wall Street.

2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Europe's Central Bank To Buy Bonds To Steady Stocks

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 7:05 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And late last night, the European Central Bank decided to buy Italian and Spanish bonds to calm market concerns that those two countries would not be able to pay their debts.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Rome.

And Sylvia, how did Italy react to the move by the European Central Bank?

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2:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Asian Markets Slide On U.S. Credit Downgrade

Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Anthony Kuhn about the latest on Asian market reaction to the downgraded U.S. credit rating by Standard and Poor's.

8:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
U.S.

FAA Operations Up In The Air Amid Shutdown

Originally published on Wed August 3, 2011 11:42 am

A fence secures the perimeter of a half-completed 236-foot FAA control tower at Oakland International Airport. Construction has been halted because of the FAA shutdown.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

A partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, prompted by a political dispute, is adding to the country's debt. This month alone, that shutdown will cost the Treasury $1 billion in uncollected airline ticket taxes.

The shutdown is happening because of a labor dispute, a long-standing rivalry and a disagreement over subsidizing small airports. It's not clear when it will all be resolved now that members of Congress are leaving Washington, D.C., for their summer recess.

NPR's Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Brian Naylor about what's behind the standoff.

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2:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
Africa

Ailing Mubarak Wheeled Into Cairo Corruption Trial

Egypt's ousted president Hosni Mubarak goes on trial in Cairo today along with his two sons and top officials from his government. Mubarak could face the death penalty if he is convicted of ordering attacks on protesters in Tahrir Square that left some 800 dead.

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