All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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3:15pm

Mon March 12, 2012
The Salt

Death By Bacon? Study Finds Eating Meat Is Risky

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 9:14 pm

This would be considered a "once in a while" food.
iStockphoto.com

Bacon has been called the gateway meat, luring vegetarians back to meat. And hot dogs are a staple at many a backyard BBQ.

But a new study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine finds that daily consumption of red meat — particularly processed meat — may be riskier than carnivores realize.

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1:00pm

Mon March 12, 2012
Election 2012

GOP Candidates Make Last-Minute Appeals In South

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 7:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The push is on for Republican voters in the heart of Dixie. Tomorrow, Alabama and Mississippi hold primaries. And today, that's where you could spot Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum. During visits to the Gulf Coast, each of them bashed President Obama's record on energy, as NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

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1:00pm

Sun March 11, 2012
Afghanistan

U.S. Soldier Accused Of Afghan Killings

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 3:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's now turn to news overseas and a story we've been following today out of Afghanistan. An American soldier is in custody after allegedly walking out of a military base in southern Afghanistan and opening fire on nearby houses. At least 16 people, including several children, were shot. Now, just a few hours ago, the acting American ambassador to Afghanistan, James Cunningham, spoke about the incident.

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1:00pm

Sun March 11, 2012
Religion

Black Leader For Southern Baptist Convention?

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 3:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Sunday morning, as it's said, is often the most segregated part of the week in America. The Southern Baptist church is still struggling to repair its segregated past. The Southern Baptist Convention is rooted in the rift over slavery, which it supported, and not too long ago, it backed segregation.

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1:00pm

Sun March 11, 2012
Books

Three-Minute Fiction

Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction is open. Author Luis Alberto Urrea, the new judge, is on board and ready to read. The challenge this round: The story must begin with the sentence, "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally decided to walk through the door." As always, the story must be 600 words or fewer. To submit a story, go to npr.org/threeminutefiction.

12:41pm

Sun March 11, 2012
Author Interviews

'Schoolhouse': Rosenwald Schools In The South

Northwestern University Press

Julius Rosenwald and Booker T. Washington came from vastly different backgrounds.

Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck and Co., was one of the richest men in America; Washington rose out of slavery to become a civil rights leader. But their meeting led eventually to the construction of thousands of schools for black children in the segregated South.

Stephanie Deutsch tells the story of their friendship in her new book You Need a Schoolhouse: Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South.

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9:44am

Sun March 11, 2012
Music

From Thousands Of Songs, Four SXSW Discoveries

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 9:27 am

K Ishibashi, who performs under the name Kishi Bashi, will perform at SXSW Friday.
Courtesy of the artist

This week, more than 2,000 bands will perform live as part of the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas — and each will hope to stand out somehow. It's one thing to play SXSW, but another to generate excitement.

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2:36pm

Sat March 10, 2012
Music Interviews

Zieti: Amid Brutal Conflict, A Musical Friendship Survives

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 4:12 pm

Zieti's members and extended family in the band's early days. Left to right: Tiende Laurent, Gnakale Aristide, Michael Shereikis (in back) with wife Natasha and son Nicholas, Yeoue Narcisse and Alex Owre.
Courtesy of the artist

The musical group Zieti started when two American expats met two Ivorian musicians living in a seaside shantytown. They became fast friends, rehearsing on the beach and even recording a few tracks together. The tracks then went missing when Ivory Coast fell into a brutal civil war, scattering Zieti's core to the four winds. Then, after a decade apart, the players reconnected and set about re-recording their lost songs.

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1:00pm

Sat March 10, 2012
Asia

A Year Later, Japan Slowly Recovers

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

It's already Sunday in Japan. And people across that country will begin to commemorate the victims of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck one year ago. In a moment, we're going to hear about a group of volunteers who have been working with survivors, helping them get back on their feet.

But first to our correspondent Anthony Kuhn who's in Japan. And, Anthony, tell us, first of all, where you are and how it compares to what you saw a year ago.

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1:00pm

Sat March 10, 2012
Asia

Volunteers Aid Lives Shattered By Japan Disaster

As Japan continues to rebuild after last year's devastating earthquake and tsunami, many Japanese are devoting themselves to dealing with the human costs of the tragedy. Almost 20,000 people died in the disaster, but many thousands more were left injured, homeless and destitute. Doualy Xaykaothao met a group of Japanese people trying to make a difference.

1:00pm

Sat March 10, 2012
Around the Nation

The Curious Case Of Teen Tics In Le Roy, N.Y.

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Now to a story that's gripped a small town in Upstate, New York for the past five months. It's about 18 high school girls in the working-class town of Le Roy. It's just outside of Rochester. Reporter Susan Dominus wrote about it in this week's issue of the New York Times magazine, and she says it all started back in October when a high school cheerleader named Katie Krautwurst woke up from a nap.

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7:55am

Sat March 10, 2012
Arts & Life

Here (And There, And Really Everywhere) Be Dragons

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 3:43 pm

A close-up of a dragon robe, or long pao, dated late 18th- or early 19th-century China. It's one of many on display in the exhibit "Dragons, Nagas, and Creatures of the Deep" at the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C.
Renee Comet Textile Museum

As the supernatural enjoys a pop culture resurgence — from vampires to fairy tales — there's also been a firestorm of fascination with dragons. Fire-breathing dragons are central to the much-anticipated second season of the HBO series Game of Thrones, which opens April 1. And this year alone the mystical creatures are being featured in two movies, a new book, video games and a museum exhibit.

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10:01pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction Round 8: She Closed The Book...

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 9:06 pm

Luis Alberto Urrea was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction in 2005.
Nicole Waite Little, Brown & Co.

Ready for some creative competition? Weekends on All Things Considered is launching Round 8 of its Three-Minute Fiction contest. Here's what we look for: original, short fiction that can be read in less than three minutes — that's no more than 600 words.

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3:09pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Performing Arts

Mike Nichols: 'Salesman' By Day, Artist Always

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:13 pm

In the course of his career, director Mike Nichols has won Emmy Awards, Tony Awards, an Oscar and a Grammy.
Matt Sayles AP

Film and theater director Mike Nichols doesn't talk — he sells.

"The producers want us to sell, sell, sell," Nichols tells NPR's Robert Siegel. "That's my little joke. That's what we do by day; by night, we're artists."

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1:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Energy

Ohio Toughens Regulations On Gas Drillers

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You are listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Earthquakes in eastern Ohio have prompted stiff new regulations for some energy companies. The companies dispose of waste water from fracking by injecting it into deep underground wells. And some low-magnitude quakes in the Youngstown area have been linked to that disposal process. So Ohio's Department of Natural Resources introduced the new rules today.

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1:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Science

Film Director To Travel To Bottom Of Mariana Trench

Robert Siegel talks to retired Navy Captain Don Walsh about the attempt by movie director James Cameron to take a submersible capsule to the bottom of the Mariana Trench — the deepest spot on Earth. Walsh says it will be a combination of science and adventure, because Cameron is a storyteller and dedicated amateur explorer. Walsh made a 1960 dive to the same trench.

11:11am

Fri March 9, 2012
Planet Money

This 14-Year-Old Girl Just Bought A House In Florida

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 8:46 am

Willow Tufano, landlord.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

Meet Willow Tufano, age 14: Lady Gaga fan, animal lover, landlord.

In 2005, when Willow was 7, the housing market was booming. Home prices in some Florida neighborhoods nearly doubled from one month to the next. Her family moved into a big house; her mom became a real estate agent.

But as Willow moved from childhood to adolescence, the market turned, and the neighborhood emptied out. "Everyone is getting foreclosed on here," she says.

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3:33pm

Thu March 8, 2012
U.S.

House Committee Urges Action On Food Stamp Fraud

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 4:11 pm

One USDA official credits the use of plastic benefit cards with helping to reduce federal food stamp fraud. But lawmakers say that isn't enough.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

With more than 46 million recipients, the food stamp program has become one of the government's biggest benefit programs.

It has also become one of the biggest targets for those who think the federal government isn't doing enough to prevent fraud.

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2:42pm

Thu March 8, 2012
Winter Songs

Winter Songs: A Family In Limbo Looks To Brandi Carlile

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 4:11 pm

Brandi Carlile's song "Dying Day" took on new meaning for a Wisconsin woman hoping to adopt a child from Ethiopia.
Courtesy of the artist

This year's Winter Song playlist concludes with music that carried one woman though a difficult season that would change her life.

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3:23pm

Wed March 7, 2012
Movies

In 'Mosquita Y Mari,' A Tale Of Self And Community

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 12:32 pm

(From left) Pineda, writer-director Aurora Guerrero and Troncoso pose for a portrait during the 2012 Sundance Film Festival.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

The film Mosquita y Mari — the first narrative feature by a Chicana director to screen at the Sundance Film Festival — is both the singular vision of writer-director Aurora Guerrero and a crowdsourced production that could not have been made without multiple communities coming together.

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