All Things Considered Sunday

Sunday, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Hosted by: Arun Rath
Mendy Mills

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts All Things Considered Sunday.

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2:54pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Fine Art

After Decades In Storage, Damaged Rothko Murals Get High-Tech Restoration

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Panel Five of Rothko's Harvard Murals hangs in Holyoke Center in January 1968.
Courtesy of Harvard University Archives

Paintings by postwar abstract artist Mark Rothko are highly coveted — in May one of his works sold at auction in London for $50 million. But oddly enough, Harvard University has had a handful of Rothkos — faded by sunlight and splattered with food and drink — in storage. Now, new technology has led to a potentially controversial restoration.

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2:11pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Medical Treatments

Health Officials Push HIV Prevention Pills

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

The World Health Organization has announced a sweeping new guideline, recommending that all men who have sex with mean take antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a similar recommendation in May. For more on these announcements, Melissa Block speaks with reporter Richard Knox.

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2:11pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Middle East

Among Israelis, Pressure Swells To Commence Ground War In Gaza

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As we mentioned, no Israelis have been killed by rocket fire, but one strike today did cause severe injuries and damage. Around 8:30 in the morning local time, a rocket struck a gas station in Ashdod. One man was sent to the hospital seriously wounded. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports this increases the internal pressure on Israel to stage a ground invasion.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: A taxi driver Avram Ayash, comes to this gas station every day. This morning he watched the place go up in flames.

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2:11pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Music Interviews

The Music — And Mess — In Ben Watt's Long Goodbye To His Father

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 2:54 pm

Ben Watt is a singer and DJ, best known for being in the British pop duo Everything but the Girl. Now, he's back with a new album and a book that gives an inside look at his complicated relationship with his parents.

4:49pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Salt

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 9:12 am

Intrepid pizza purveyors in action: Frontier Airlines flight attendants pass out pies to the delighted passengers.
Logan Marie Torres AP

It's one of those stories that start in the middle. Midflight from Washington, D.C., to Denver on Monday, pilot Gerhard Brandner hit some bad weather that forced him to land in Wyoming. It was a mundane delay like most others. His Frontier Airlines plane was grounded on a tarmac in Cheyenne.

That's when the pilot made a decision that made him a national hero.

"I figure out, well, I'm getting hungry; I'll bet you the folks be hungry back there, too," Brandner says. "So I called Domino's."

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4:16pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Politics

Obama's Request For Immigration Funds Meets Pushback On The Hill

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

President Obama has asked Congress for $3.7 billion in emergency funds to address the influx of immigrant children at the U.S.-Mexico border. The Senate Appropriations Committee is holding a hearing Thursday about the request.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:16pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Salt

This Fine Wine Made At An Italian Penal Colony Is No 2-Buck Chuck

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:58 pm

Marquise Lamberto Frescobaldi (right), of the winemaking dynasty, talks with prisoners Brian Baldissin (left) and Francesco Papa at his vineyard on Gorgona island in June 2013.
Alessandro Bianchi Reuters/Landov

Eighteen miles off Tuscany's coast, Gorgona is Italy's last island prison. Its steep cliffs rise up from azure Mediterranean waters. Here, a select group of convicts serves the end of long sentences by farming. And now, a legendary winemaker is training them to make high-end wine.

Mentioned by Dante in The Divine Comedy, Gorgona was for thousands of years a refuge for hermits and monks. Since 1869, it's been a penal colony.

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4:15pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Shots - Health News

A Growing Number Of Veterans Struggles To Quit Powerful Painkillers

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 5:20 pm

Bryan McDonel and his father, Mike, both served multiple tours in Iraq with the National Guard. Bryan was first prescribed painkillers before his deployment, and his dependence on medication prompted a downward spiral.
Quil Lawrence NPR

There are antlers everywhere on the walls of Bryan and Mike McDonel's place near Pine Bluff, Ark. The house is hardly big enough for all their hunting trophies. Both are good shots with their hunting bows; Bryan and Mike, his father, served in the Arkansas National Guard and deployed together to Iraq, twice.

The McDonel family has served in the military for generations. But Bryan, 35, is out of the service now. He is one of thousands of troops and veterans who struggle with addiction to prescription drugs.

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3:15pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Code Switch

In Stories Of Muslim Identity, Playwright Explores Fault Lines Of Faith

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:18 am

Between Eli and Zarina (Greg Keller and Nadine Malouf), a family's Muslim faith undergoes rupture and renewal.
Erin Baiano Courtesy of Lincoln Center Theater

Ayad Akhtar is a novelist, actor and screenwriter. And when his first play, Disgraced, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2013, he also became one of the most talked about new voices in American theater.

Long before this buzz, though, Akhtar grew up in a Muslim family with roots in Pakistan. He mines this background to bring the inner lives and conflicts of Muslim Americans to the stage. His plays often feature cutting dialogue and confrontations steeped in the tension between Islamic tradition and personal evolution.

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2:59pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Business

Picketing Truckers Raise Tensions At LA Port Amid Dockworker Talks

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Picketers supporting independent truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach stand outside a container terminal.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Labor tensions are high at the largest port complex in the country — Los Angeles and Long Beach — which handles nearly half of all the cargo coming into the United States.

Short-haul truck drivers are striking. They're the independent, contract truckers who bring the containers off the ships to nearby warehouses for companies like Wal-Mart and Costco. At the twin ports, their numbers hover around 10,000.

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2:59pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Medical Treatments

HIV Returns In Infected Toddler, Dashing Hopes Of Imminent Cure

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Federal officials have announced that a young Mississippi girl, once thought to have been cured of HIV, now once again has detectable levels of the virus. This is a setback not just for the child, but also for hope of eradicating HIV in infants with a potent mix of drugs at birth.

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2:02pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Around the Nation

The Hopes And Hazards Of The 17-Story Water Slide

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Kansas City now boasts the world's tallest water slide. At about 17 stories high, the slide had been postponed multiple times during construction after tests went bad. As Frank Morris of KCUR reports, the slide is attracting thrill-seekers and naysayers alike.

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2:02pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Politics

In The High Drama Of Its 1964 Convention, GOP Hung A Right Turn

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

In advance of the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Republican Convention, Robert Siegel speaks with The New York Times writer-at-large Sam Tanenhaus. They discuss the impact that the Civil Rights Act, passed earlier that year, had on the nomination of Barry Goldwater.

2:02pm

Thu July 10, 2014
U.S.

In A Unanimously Passed Law, The Seeds Of An Immigration Controversy

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

The handling of unaccompanied minors crossing the border is governed by a law that was passed in 2008, before President Obama took office. For more about the law, Robert Siegel speaks with David Abramowitz, who helped work on the law when it passed. Abramowitz is currently the vice president of Humanity United.

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6:29pm

Wed July 9, 2014
News

Obama Turns To Gov. Perry In Seeking A Solution To Border Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:40 pm

After a meeting with Texas Gov. Rick Perry, President Obama addressed the influx of migrant children on the U.S.-Mexico border. He signaled his openness to Perry's solutions, saying he'd consider deploying the National Guard, but also called on Congress to offer solutions of its own.

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5:25pm

Wed July 9, 2014
Law

For Kids In Immigration Court, Legal Counsel Is Catch As Catch Can

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Protesters outside a San Antonio courthouse advocate for legal representation for immigrant children.
John Burnett NPR

The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups sued the federal government Wednesday for its failure to provide legal representation to immigrant children in deportation proceedings.

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3:52pm

Wed July 9, 2014
Men In America

On Calif. Cattle Ranch, Students Wrangle With Meaning Of Manhood

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

For All Things Considered's "Men in America" series, NPR's Kelly McEvers sent this report on Deep Springs College — the all-male college that her husband attended, and where he and McEvers have both taught.

About a hundred years ago, a man named L.L. Nunn was building power plants in the American West. He wanted a place where workers could be educated — and educated people could do work.

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3:35pm

Wed July 9, 2014
Parallels

On Opposite Sides Of Israeli-Gaza Border, Feeling The Same Fears

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

Several families share this one-room underground shelter in Ashkelon, Israel, not far from the border with Gaza. The children say they're afraid to go outside.
Ari Shapiro NPR

More than 50 Palestinians have been killed and 450 wounded in Israeli airstrikes on the Gaza Strip. Meanwhile, rockets continue to fly toward Israel from Gaza, but so far, no Israelis have been reported killed.

For people living in and around the Gaza Strip, this conflict has turned daily routines upside down. Life is punctuated by sirens and explosions.

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3:19pm

Wed July 9, 2014
Politics

Obama Stumps In Colorado, With Women's Vote As Backdrop

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:39 pm

President Obama greets a woman at Wazee Supper Club in Denver on Tuesday. He was in Colorado this week speaking about the economy and raising money for congressional candidates.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

In Colorado, where President Obama's approval rating is low and the Senate race is tight, Democratic incumbent Mark Udall largely bowed out of the spotlight of the president's visit Wednesday.

But as Obama made the rounds speaking about the economy and raising money for Democratic congressional candidates, he also spoke about the women's issues that could be key to Udall's electoral success.

At a morning outdoor rally in Denver's Cheesman Park, Obama emphasized just how much is on the line in the midterms.

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3:19pm

Wed July 9, 2014
Music News

Clash In Nashville: A Property Battle On Music Row Draws A Crowd

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:27 am

Inside RCA Studio A, whose sale has sparked a wave of backlash from the Nashville music community, Ben Folds (right, on staircase) addresses press and supporters.
Stephen Jerkins

News that a Nashville developer is paying $4.4 million for a half-century-old recording studio has sparked a battle in Music City. On one side is singer-songwriter Ben Folds, inspired by the musical history made in that studio. On the other, a trailblazing musician who made that history.

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